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The New Entrepreneurs: An Institutional History of Television Anthology Writers [NOOK Book]

Overview

According to the sociologist C. Wright Mills in his 1951 book, White Collar: The American Middle Classes, the “new entrepreneur” was a lone wolf able to succeed in post–World War II corporate America by elusively meandering through various institutions. During this time, anthology writers such as Rod Serling, Reginald Rose, and Paddy Chayefsky achieved a level of creativity that has rarely been equaled on television since. Yet despite their success, anthology writers still needed to evade the constraints and ...

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The New Entrepreneurs: An Institutional History of Television Anthology Writers

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Overview

According to the sociologist C. Wright Mills in his 1951 book, White Collar: The American Middle Classes, the “new entrepreneur” was a lone wolf able to succeed in post–World War II corporate America by elusively meandering through various institutions. During this time, anthology writers such as Rod Serling, Reginald Rose, and Paddy Chayefsky achieved a level of creativity that has rarely been equaled on television since. Yet despite their success, anthology writers still needed to evade the constraints and censorship of 50s television in order to stay true to their creative powers and political visions. Thus they worked as new entrepreneurs who adapted their more controversial scripts for the Hollywood, Broadway, and book publishing industries. Even after the television networks cancelled their prestigious anthology series at the end of the 50s, the most resilient writers were able to redefine what it meant to be entrepreneurs by launching cutting-edge shows such as The Twilight Zone and The Defenders that are still popular today. The New Entrepreneurs includes detailed textual analysis of legendary, sometimes hard-to-find, television anthology scripts that have received only cursory glances in television history until now.

Ebook Edition Note: All images have been redacted.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Kraszewski is able to show that his 'new entrepreneurs' did bring a surprising amount of liberal politics to television in the 1950s." —Kathy M. Newman, American Quarterly

“The strength of The New Entrepreneurs lies in its careful research into the seldom-examined archives of individual television writers. … The New Entrepreneurs provides a welcome addition to early television history by recontextualizing some key figures in the celebrated developmental age of television.”—Joshua Gleich, Velvet Light Trap

“Kraszewski’s book presents a stunning new and complete vision of the Golden Age dramatists….The New Entrepreneurs achieves a rich perspective on this period—and on the analysis of media industries in general—through its synthesis of aesthetic, social-historical, and economic perspectives.” —Tom Kemper, Historical Journal of Film, Radio, and Television

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780819571038
  • Publisher: Wesleyan University Press
  • Publication date: 2/1/2011
  • Series: Wesleyan Film
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 236
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

JON KRASZEWSKI is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication at Seton Hall University.

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Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Between the Television and Book Publishing Industries: Anthology Writers and Their Struggle for Authorial Identities
Between the Television and Theater Industries: Representations of Race in Rod Serling’s “Noon on Doomsday”
Between the Television and Motion Picture Industries: Paddy Chayefsky’s “Marty” as Art Cinema
New Strategies for Entrepreneurship: Reginald Rose, The Defenders, and the 1960s Television Industry
A New Zone of Production?: Rod Serling’s Attempt to Redefine the Role of the Writer in the 1960s Television Industry
Notes
Bibliography
Index

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