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Overview

This book comprehensively covers the debatable issues regarding the post-September 11th wave of terrorism, the multiple roots of this deadly new form of international violence, and the leading ideas being considered as means for the “war on global terrorism” to be won. Informed and informative interpretations, written by the world's most authoritative scholars especially for this book, present a balanced and accessible set of essays and chapters describing the new international terrain that has emerged in the wake of 9-11. A three-part organization breaks the subject of global terrorism into three categories of analysis, and demonstrates to readers that how terrorism is defined will shape the conclusions that are reached about its causes and remedies. For analyzing present and future acts of terrorism, creating awareness of the obstacles to accurately understanding it, and consideration of the strategies for containing the destructiveness of this deadly phenomena.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780130494139
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 9/24/2002
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 284
  • Sales rank: 1,273,347
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Charles W. Kegley is Pearce Professor of International Relations at the University of South Carolina. A past President of the International Studies Association (1993-1994), he has also taught at the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service, the University of Texas, Rutgers University as the Moses and Annuta Back Peace Scholar, and the People's University of China. In addition, he was a Pew Fellow at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Carnegie Council on Ethics and International Affairs.

Kegley is Senior Editor of the Prentice Hall Studies in International Relations: Enduring Questions in Changing Times series devoted to the publication of serious scholarship addressing major problems and issues in international affairs. Among his four dozen book publications, he has recently published From War to Peace: Fateful Decisions in International Politics, Exorcising the Ghost of Westphalia: Building World Order in the New Millennium, World Politics: Trend and Transformation; American Foreign Policy: Pattern and Process; How Nations Make Peace, The Global Agenda, Controversies in International Relations Theory: Realism and the Neoliberal Challenge, A Multipolar Peace? Great Power Politics in the Twenty First Century; The Long Postwar Peace. Contending Explanations and Projections After the Cold War. Questioning the Morality of Nuclear Deterrence; When Trust Breaks Down: Alliance Norms and World Politics; International Terrorism; and The Nuclear Reader. Strategy, Weapons, War. He has published articles in a wide range of scholarly journals, including The Journal of Peace Research, The Journal of Conflict Resolution, International Studies Quarterly, Ethics and International Affairs, Cooperation and Conflict, The Bulletin of Peace Proposals, Alternatives, USA Today, Harvard International Review, Presidential Studies Quarterly, Comparative Political Studies, Conflict Management and Peace Science, International Interactions, The Journal of Politics, and the Political Research Quarterly.

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Read an Excerpt

The September 11, 2001 terrorist destruction of New York City's World Trade Center and the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia, has stimulated much fresh thinking about the way collegiate instruction in international affairs and national security ought to be organized, and has culminated in reconstruction and revision of conventional coverage concerning the global terrorism now unfolding in the discourse about this problem. Understandably, in the wake of that horrendous 9/11 event and in response to the fear and interest that it provoked, the syllabi of many courses now give expanded coverage to global terrorism as a topic, and numerous new courses dealing exclusively with the subject have been added to the undergraduate and graduate curriculum. However, the available recent scholarship on terrorism arguably has not yet been assembled in a way that accommodates the need for instructional materials for use in the classroom, in light of the troubled new realities that now so stubbornly confront the entire world.

There is arguably a notable lag between the perceived new realities and the issues and topics addressed by much of the existing literature prepared primarily to orient students to the key points of debate about the nature, determinants, and means to combat the latest wave of terrorism. Moreover, the contemporary reader who wanders into a bookstore or library to find books and journal articles about international terrorism is likely to walk into a morass of contending views and competing prescriptions, and cannot help coming away feeling more puzzled than enlightened. It is my belief that the commentary regarding the rising threat of global terrorism needs to be put into perspective in a concise but representative sample of prevailing and divergent opinion that clarifies rather than adds to the confusion, while presenting a balanced assessment that allows for the spectrum of disagreement on the major issues to be considered.

This book is written primarily for instructors use to aid their students and help them to evaluate the key questions surrounding terrorism, in the aftermath of 9/11. The collection has been assembled by selecting the world's leading experts and asking them to write original interpretations on particular topics. The goal is to provide an integrated anthology for instruction, written in the same accessible language that covers the most important topics and central arguments in the current debate about the nature of today's terrorist threats and methods of containing those multiple threats.

Obviously, no book on this topic can cover all issues, and this book is no exception. Without apologizing, this anthology seeks to sample the range of discussion without billing itself as providing a complete picture. Indeed, what has been included for student instruction is extracted from a huge nest of available research and commentary on the subject, and this book only provides a partial glimpse of the range of evaluation that exists. However, to assist instructors, it is important for them to note and to take advantage of the fact that the editor has written detailed introductions to each of the three parts. These essays summarize the key concepts and literature dealing with, respectively, the characteristics, causes, and control of today's terrorism. Each part introduction also provides a rationale for the essays that are presented as well as an overview of each chapter's theme and conclusion, placed into the context of other literature dealing with the same topic. Considerations of space precluded the publication of these extensive part introductions in the text, in the interest of making more space available for the authoritative essays deemed crucial for readers. However, the part introductions are available at the Prentice Hall website. All instructors are encouraged to exploit the information and critical comparative analysis provided by the editor's part introductions, which serves as a handy instructor's manual for the entire volume. They can be examined and retrieved at www.prenhall.com/politicalscience or can be located at Prentice Hall's "political science central".

The organization employed for The New Global Terrorism does not restrict the way the instructor might utilize the book. Though the text conveniently divides major issues and questions into three categories, the volume does not necessarily require that a particular sequence of presentation be followed for introducing the chapters pedagogically. Depending on the needs and preferences of the individual instructor, the parts (and the chapters selected and solicited for publication within them) may be reorganized without violating the meaning of the essays. Yet, the whole of The New Global Terrorism remains greater than the sum of its parts, for the ideas presented in each reading contribute synergistically to the understanding of the others.

Although there already exists an abundant technical (and often esoteric) literature on terrorism, and although the "new age of terrorism" since the atrocity of September 11 has generated an avalanche of new interpretative literature, The New Global Terrorism seeks to make a distinctive contribution. Assembling the major arguments, most authoritative statements, and most compelling empirical descriptions and normative interpretations, this book is designed to introduce students to key concepts to which they can refer for analyzing what may be anticipated with respect to future incidents of global terrorism. By design, therefore, the book is intended to do more than cover previous incidents of terrorism, such as the system-shattering events on September 11, 2001, which set the stage for a major reconfiguring of world politics similar in scope to the transformations provoked by the two World Wars and the Cold War in the twentieth century; the book provides a framework as well for analyzing present and future acts of terrorism.

The New Global Terrorism's major analytic contribution centers on its effort to expose the multifarious parts of a perplexing—and what promises to remain an enduring—puzzle. It might thereby allow the broad picture to be visualized, and illuminate the extensive range of opinion that can describe, account for, and combat terrorist activities in the aftermath of 9/11. Under this conviction, the analyst can see how the pieces to the puzzle fit by examining them when, as in the catastrophic events of September 11, 2001, they fell apart.

Specifically prepared for pedagogical purposes, The New Global Terrorism has been constructed to provoke interest, arouse controversy, and educate by demonstrating the inadequacy of simplistic theories and stereotypical images as well as by illustrating the tensions between contending interpretations and schools of thought. Given that the existing literature on terrorism is rife with ambiguity, impassioned rhetoric, and unsubstantiated claims, it is hoped The New Global Terrorism will demonstrate to students that how terrorism is defined will shape the conclusions reached about its causes and remedies. Similarly, the book seeks to illuminate how assumptions about terrorism's causes or the effectiveness of various counter-terrorism strategies will influence images of terrorism's essential defining characteristics. Thus, the text stresses the importance of studying terrorism with detached and dispassionate critical analysis from diverse perspectives. In so pursuing the educational principle, the book aims to expand awareness of the inherent limitations of efforts to reduce the subject to a single and simplistic account which overlooks the relationships between conclusions about terrorism's characteristics, causes, and controls.

No book can succeed without the help of many people. Intellectually, this book is a sequel to, and derived from, its well-received predecessor, International Terrorism (New York: St. Martin's Press, and London: Macmillan Education LTD, 1990). Much has changed in the eleven short years that have transpired until September 11, 2001, when the terrorist attacks created—and I say this without fear of hyperbole—a radically new international landscape darkened by the spectre of enduring global terrorism aimed at mass destruction. Accordingly, The New Global Terrorism has been designed to capture the sea changes in the conduct of terrorism that have occurred since 9/11, and this new anthology bears little resemblance to its 1990 predecessor, except in organization. All but two chapters have been replaced in this new text.

The development of this new book has been guided by advice from numerous experts in this area of specialization, and the text has also benefited from the helpful reviews provided for Prentice Hall by anonymous referees who evaluated earlier versions of the manuscript. But what has especially helped to make The New Global Terrorism so informed and informative was the willingness and ability of many scholars, regarded worldwide as experts in the study of terrorism, to graciously offer to author original chapters especially for this book. These authors include Martha Crenshaw, Richard A. Falk, Ted Robert Gurr, David Held, Llewellyn D. Howell, James Turner Johnson, Loch K. Johnson, Mark Juergensmeyer, Michael T. Klare, David C. Rapoport, Gregory A. Raymond, Richard E. Rubenstein, Peter C. Sederberg, Michael Stohl, and Paul Wilkinson.

The editorial support offered by Heather Shelstad, Jessica Drew, Brian Prybella, and John Jordan at Prentice Hall and Rosie Jones, Silvia Freeburg and Holly Henjum at Clarinda Publication Services was instrumental in launching this project and steering it through expeditious production. Moreover, the editorial and administrative support for preparation of the manuscript provided by the staff of the Walker Institute of International Studies at the University of South Carolina—Linda Logan, Holli Buice, Long Wang, Min Ye, Wendy Halbert, and the Institute's Director, Roger Coate—is gratefully acknowledged, as is the support for the Institute and for this publication that was given by the dean of the College of Liberal Arts at the University of South Carolina, Joan H. Stewart. The admirable tolerance for my preoccupations while preparing this manuscript for publication-as displayed on the eve of our marriage by my fiancee, Debra Annette Jump-likewise is deeply appreciated. They don't cut them like this anymore, which is one (of the least important) reasons we exchanged vows to spend the rest of our lives together as this book was published for distribution.

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Table of Contents

I. THE CHANGING CHARACTERISTICS OF TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY GLOBAL TERRORISM.

1. International Terrorism: The Other World War, Brian M. Jenkins.

2. The New Face of Combat: Terrorism and Irregular Warfare in the 21st Century, Michael T. Klare.

3. The Four Waves of Rebel Terror and September 11, David C. Rapoport.

4. A Dual Reality: Terrorism against the State and Terrorism by the State, Richard A. Falk.

5. Is There a Good Terrorist? Timothy Garton Ash.

6. The Evolving Strategies of Political Terrorism, Gregory A. Raymond.

7. The Mystery of the New Global Terrorism: Old Myths, New Realities? Michael Stohl.

II. THE CAUSES OF TERRORISM, PAST AND PRESENT.

8. The Causes of Terrorism, Martha Crenshaw.

9. Why Modern Terrorism?: Differentiating Types and Distinguishing Ideological Motivations, Paul Wilkinson.

10. The Psycho-Political Source of Terrorism, Richard E. Rubenstein.

11. Postmodern Terrorism, Walter Laqueur.

12. Why is America the Primary Target? Terrorism as Globalized Civil War, Martha Crenshaw.

13. Is The New Global Terrorism a Clash of Civilizations?: Evaluating Terrorism's Multiple Sources, Llewellyn D. Howell.

14. The Religious Roots of Contemporary Terrorism, Mark Juergensmyer.

15. The Roots of Muslim Rage, Bernard Lewis.

16. Terrorism in Democracies: When It Occurs, Why It Fails, Ted Robert Gurr.

III. THE CONTROL OF THE NEW AGE OF GLOBAL TERRORISM.

17. The Aftermath of 9/11 and the Search for Limits: In Defense of Just War Thinking, Richard A. Falk.

18. Just War Theory: Responding Morally to Global Terrorism, James Turner Johnson.

19. Strategic Intelligence: The Weakest Link in the War against Terrorism, Loch Johnson.

20. Bringing International Law to Bear on the Control of the New Terrorism in the Global Age, David Held.

21. Global Terrorism: Problems of Challenge and Response, Peter C. Sederberg.

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Preface

The September 11, 2001 terrorist destruction of New York City's World Trade Center and the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia, has stimulated much fresh thinking about the way collegiate instruction in international affairs and national security ought to be organized, and has culminated in reconstruction and revision of conventional coverage concerning the global terrorism now unfolding in the discourse about this problem. Understandably, in the wake of that horrendous 9/11 event and in response to the fear and interest that it provoked, the syllabi of many courses now give expanded coverage to global terrorism as a topic, and numerous new courses dealing exclusively with the subject have been added to the undergraduate and graduate curriculum. However, the available recent scholarship on terrorism arguably has not yet been assembled in a way that accommodates the need for instructional materials for use in the classroom, in light of the troubled new realities that now so stubbornly confront the entire world.

There is arguably a notable lag between the perceived new realities and the issues and topics addressed by much of the existing literature prepared primarily to orient students to the key points of debate about the nature, determinants, and means to combat the latest wave of terrorism. Moreover, the contemporary reader who wanders into a bookstore or library to find books and journal articles about international terrorism is likely to walk into a morass of contending views and competing prescriptions, and cannot help coming away feeling more puzzled than enlightened. It is my belief that the commentary regarding the rising threat of global terrorism needs to be put into perspective in a concise but representative sample of prevailing and divergent opinion that clarifies rather than adds to the confusion, while presenting a balanced assessment that allows for the spectrum of disagreement on the major issues to be considered.

This book is written primarily for instructors use to aid their students and help them to evaluate the key questions surrounding terrorism, in the aftermath of 9/11. The collection has been assembled by selecting the world's leading experts and asking them to write original interpretations on particular topics. The goal is to provide an integrated anthology for instruction, written in the same accessible language that covers the most important topics and central arguments in the current debate about the nature of today's terrorist threats and methods of containing those multiple threats.

Obviously, no book on this topic can cover all issues, and this book is no exception. Without apologizing, this anthology seeks to sample the range of discussion without billing itself as providing a complete picture. Indeed, what has been included for student instruction is extracted from a huge nest of available research and commentary on the subject, and this book only provides a partial glimpse of the range of evaluation that exists. However, to assist instructors, it is important for them to note and to take advantage of the fact that the editor has written detailed introductions to each of the three parts. These essays summarize the key concepts and literature dealing with, respectively, the characteristics, causes, and control of today's terrorism. Each part introduction also provides a rationale for the essays that are presented as well as an overview of each chapter's theme and conclusion, placed into the context of other literature dealing with the same topic. Considerations of space precluded the publication of these extensive part introductions in the text, in the interest of making more space available for the authoritative essays deemed crucial for readers. However, the part introductions are available at the Prentice Hall website. All instructors are encouraged to exploit the information and critical comparative analysis provided by the editor's part introductions, which serves as a handy instructor's manual for the entire volume. They can be examined and retrieved at www.prenhall.com/politicalscience or can be located at Prentice Hall's "political science central".

The organization employed for The New Global Terrorism does not restrict the way the instructor might utilize the book. Though the text conveniently divides major issues and questions into three categories, the volume does not necessarily require that a particular sequence of presentation be followed for introducing the chapters pedagogically. Depending on the needs and preferences of the individual instructor, the parts (and the chapters selected and solicited for publication within them) may be reorganized without violating the meaning of the essays. Yet, the whole of The New Global Terrorism remains greater than the sum of its parts, for the ideas presented in each reading contribute synergistically to the understanding of the others.

Although there already exists an abundant technical (and often esoteric) literature on terrorism, and although the "new age of terrorism" since the atrocity of September 11 has generated an avalanche of new interpretative literature, The New Global Terrorism seeks to make a distinctive contribution. Assembling the major arguments, most authoritative statements, and most compelling empirical descriptions and normative interpretations, this book is designed to introduce students to key concepts to which they can refer for analyzing what may be anticipated with respect to future incidents of global terrorism. By design, therefore, the book is intended to do more than cover previous incidents of terrorism, such as the system-shattering events on September 11, 2001, which set the stage for a major reconfiguring of world politics similar in scope to the transformations provoked by the two World Wars and the Cold War in the twentieth century; the book provides a framework as well for analyzing present and future acts of terrorism.

The New Global Terrorism's major analytic contribution centers on its effort to expose the multifarious parts of a perplexing—and what promises to remain an enduring—puzzle. It might thereby allow the broad picture to be visualized, and illuminate the extensive range of opinion that can describe, account for, and combat terrorist activities in the aftermath of 9/11. Under this conviction, the analyst can see how the pieces to the puzzle fit by examining them when, as in the catastrophic events of September 11, 2001, they fell apart.

Specifically prepared for pedagogical purposes, The New Global Terrorism has been constructed to provoke interest, arouse controversy, and educate by demonstrating the inadequacy of simplistic theories and stereotypical images as well as by illustrating the tensions between contending interpretations and schools of thought. Given that the existing literature on terrorism is rife with ambiguity, impassioned rhetoric, and unsubstantiated claims, it is hoped The New Global Terrorism will demonstrate to students that how terrorism is defined will shape the conclusions reached about its causes and remedies. Similarly, the book seeks to illuminate how assumptions about terrorism's causes or the effectiveness of various counter-terrorism strategies will influence images of terrorism's essential defining characteristics. Thus, the text stresses the importance of studying terrorism with detached and dispassionate critical analysis from diverse perspectives. In so pursuing the educational principle, the book aims to expand awareness of the inherent limitations of efforts to reduce the subject to a single and simplistic account which overlooks the relationships between conclusions about terrorism's characteristics, causes, and controls.

No book can succeed without the help of many people. Intellectually, this book is a sequel to, and derived from, its well-received predecessor, International Terrorism (New York: St. Martin's Press, and London: Macmillan Education LTD, 1990). Much has changed in the eleven short years that have transpired until September 11, 2001, when the terrorist attacks created—and I say this without fear of hyperbole—a radically new international landscape darkened by the spectre of enduring global terrorism aimed at mass destruction. Accordingly, The New Global Terrorism has been designed to capture the sea changes in the conduct of terrorism that have occurred since 9/11, and this new anthology bears little resemblance to its 1990 predecessor, except in organization. All but two chapters have been replaced in this new text.

The development of this new book has been guided by advice from numerous experts in this area of specialization, and the text has also benefited from the helpful reviews provided for Prentice Hall by anonymous referees who evaluated earlier versions of the manuscript. But what has especially helped to make The New Global Terrorism so informed and informative was the willingness and ability of many scholars, regarded worldwide as experts in the study of terrorism, to graciously offer to author original chapters especially for this book. These authors include Martha Crenshaw, Richard A. Falk, Ted Robert Gurr, David Held, Llewellyn D. Howell, James Turner Johnson, Loch K. Johnson, Mark Juergensmeyer, Michael T. Klare, David C. Rapoport, Gregory A. Raymond, Richard E. Rubenstein, Peter C. Sederberg, Michael Stohl, and Paul Wilkinson.

The editorial support offered by Heather Shelstad, Jessica Drew, Brian Prybella, and John Jordan at Prentice Hall and Rosie Jones, Silvia Freeburg and Holly Henjum at Clarinda Publication Services was instrumental in launching this project and steering it through expeditious production. Moreover, the editorial and administrative support for preparation of the manuscript provided by the staff of the Walker Institute of International Studies at the University of South Carolina—Linda Logan, Holli Buice, Long Wang, Min Ye, Wendy Halbert, and the Institute's Director, Roger Coate—is gratefully acknowledged, as is the support for the Institute and for this publication that was given by the dean of the College of Liberal Arts at the University of South Carolina, Joan H. Stewart. The admirable tolerance for my preoccupations while preparing this manuscript for publication-as displayed on the eve of our marriage by my fiancee, Debra Annette Jump-likewise is deeply appreciated. They don't cut them like this anymore, which is one (of the least important) reasons we exchanged vows to spend the rest of our lives together as this book was published for distribution.

Read More Show Less

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