The New Hacker's Dictionary

The New Hacker's Dictionary

by Eric S. Raymond
     
 

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This new edition of the hacker's own phenomenally successful lexicon includes more than 100 new entries and updates or revises 200 more. Historically and etymologically richer than its predecessor, it supplies additional background on existing entries and clarifies the murky origins of several important jargon terms (overturning a few long-standing folk etymologies)

Overview

This new edition of the hacker's own phenomenally successful lexicon includes more than 100 new entries and updates or revises 200 more. Historically and etymologically richer than its predecessor, it supplies additional background on existing entries and clarifies the murky origins of several important jargon terms (overturning a few long-standing folk etymologies) while still retaining its high giggle value.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
A completely revised, updated, and expanded (with nearly five times as many entries) edition of the 1983 Hacker's dictionary. Collects, defines, and demystifies, with considerable color and wit, the remarkable slang used by the growing international community of computer programmers. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Mondo 2000
For anyone who likes to have slippery, elastic fun with language, this is a time for celebration. . . . The New Hacker's Dictionary . . . is not only a useful guidebook to very much un-official technical terms and street tech slang, but also a de facto ethnography of the early years of the hacker culture.
Byte Magazine
My current favorite is `wave a dead chicken.' New to you? You've waved a dead chicken when you've gone through motions to satisfy onlookers (suits?), even when you're sure it's all futile. Raymond's book exhilarates. . . . The New Hacker's Dictionary, though, is not for skimming. Allot, each day, a half hour, severely timed if you hope to get any work done.
--Hugh Kenner
New York Times Magazine - William Safire

A sprightly lexicon.

Byte - Hugh Kenner

My current favorite is 'wave a dead chicken.' New to you? You've waved a dead chicken when you've gone through motions to satisfy onlookers (suits?), even when you're sure it's all futile. Raymond's book exhilarates... The New
Hacker's Dictionary
, though, is not for skimming. Allot, each day, a half hour, severely timed if you hope to get any work done.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780262680691
Publisher:
MIT Press
Publication date:
09/15/1991
Pages:
400
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.00(d)

What People are saying about this

William Safire
A sprightly lexicon.
From the Publisher
"A sprightly lexicon." William Safire, New York Times Magazine

"For anyone who likes to have slippery, elastic fun with language, this is a time for celebration.... The New Hacker's Dictionary... is not only a useful guidebook to very much un-official technical terms and street tech slang, but also a de facto ethnography of the early years of the hacker culture." Mondo 2000

"My current favorite is 'wave a dead chicken.' New to you? You've waved a dead chicken when you've gone through motions to satisfy onlookers (suits?),even when you're sure it's all futile. Raymond's book exhilarates.... The New Hacker's Dictionary, though, is not for skimming. Allot, each day, a half hour,severely timed if you hope to get any work done." Hugh Kenner, Byte

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