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New High Intensity Training
     

New High Intensity Training

3.8 8
by Ellington Darden
 

Certain to become the bible of HIT-the training that revolutionized lifting with shorter, far-more-intense workouts-New High Intensity Training by Ellington Darden is the last word on how to achieve explosive growth safely, without steroids!

For many dedicated bodybuilders, the weight-lifting theories of Arthur Jones are gospel. It was Jones, the inventor of

Overview

Certain to become the bible of HIT-the training that revolutionized lifting with shorter, far-more-intense workouts-New High Intensity Training by Ellington Darden is the last word on how to achieve explosive growth safely, without steroids!

For many dedicated bodybuilders, the weight-lifting theories of Arthur Jones are gospel. It was Jones, the inventor of Nautilus exercise equipment, who first discovered that short, intense workouts could produce better results than the long, high-volume workouts then in vogue.

Even though research into Jones's methods has proved them correct, a number of high-profile strength coaches use HIT to train their athletes, and the bodybuilding magazine Ironman does HIT-based features every issue, there still are no major HIT books in stores. This new book-by champion bodybuilder, exercise researcher, and best-selling author Ellington Darden, who is a Jones disciple and friend-shows lifters how to apply the master's teachings, along with some new HIT concepts to achieve extraordinary results.

At the heart of the book is a complete, illustrated, six-month course for explosive growth. Exercise by exercise, workout by workout, the reader is shown precisely what to do, and perhaps even more important, what not to do. Charging that too many bodybuilders follow a more-is-better approach-too many exercises, too many sets, and too much frequency-and rely on steroids to compensate for depleted recovery ability, Darden shows why HIT, steroid-free and healthy, is the best way to safely build muscle. Finally, the exercise religion Arthur Jones founded, and Darden fine-tuned, has its bible.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781594860003
Publisher:
Rodale Press, Inc.
Publication date:
10/01/2004
Pages:
272
Sales rank:
314,645
Product dimensions:
8.36(w) x 10.78(h) x 0.81(d)

Meet the Author

Ellington Darden, Ph.D., is the leading disciple of the HIT training methods of Arthur Jones, the inventor of Nautilus exercise equipment. Darden, for 17 years the director of research for Nautilus Sports/Medical Industries, is the author of such enormously popular books on high-intensity workouts as The Nautilus Book, High-Intensity Bodybuilding, and 100 High-Intensity Ways to Build Your Body, along with 40 other fitness books. He currently resides in Windermere, Florida.

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New High Intensity Training 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was extremely skeptical when I set out to see if this fitness plan really works. Wow, was I surprised! I had been lifting weights intensely for over two years (1.5-2 hours per day, 4-5 days per week) and had only seen a marginal improvement in my physical conditioning. In that two years (even while working with personal trainers) I had only dropped 11 pounds from 215 down to 204. For the past three months I have been following the H.I.T plan, and not even as closely as recommended in the book, and I have lost 23 pounds (ALL of it fat)! I'm a 32 year old male and I haven't weighed 181 pounds in 6-7 years. This plan works and works fantastically. It's not for everyone though. You need to know your physical limits and you need to be able to tell the difference between pain caused by an intense workout and pain caused by damage to muscles and joints as this workout is intense enough that you could easily over do it if you don't know your own thresholds.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I didn't think I would be able to stick with it, but so far, it's easy enough to stay motivated. I have a fairly busy schedule so having the shorter HIT workouts helps a lot. So far, it's working pretty quickly.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was an athlete in college (just ended my last year as a thrower in track) and I was always looking for new and improved ways of training, eating, and recovering from workouts. I found this book online and bought it thinking this will either be a very good read or that it will totally change my outlook on weightlifting and building muscle. This book has transformed my way of thinking on working out in the weight room. The book gives proven advice on nutrition and supplementation. The workouts given are easy to follow and maintain. The topic is still an underground topic, but this book will bring all the information mainstream and totally transform weight training.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This was good reading and having read it I appreciate Mr. Jones' insight and input. One can raise a valid argument that alternate methods are also quite effective, as seen by Arnold Schwarzenegger and many other weight training advocates. Mr. Jones is a highly UNDER-recognized authority on the subject of musclebuilding and whose contributions have and will continue to, change the course of training in the future. One constructive piece of feedback on his theory is that he used models of animal strength, which is usually explosive,powerful but of low endurance. If you are looking to build high muscle endurance, this program does not appear to promote it. That said, one interesting aspect of his program is that less training is more effective than more training. I don't know whether to agree or not, but it seems that maybe moderate training (more than 1-2 sets but less than say 5-10 sets per exercise)combines that muscle power and mass benefits of Jones' program while increasing muscle endurance.Then again,maybe it simply depends on the individual and their discipline and genetics!! A good book regardless how you think!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I currently have somewhere in the neighborhood of 100 to 120 books on the subject of exercise, and this is the best I've read in a long time. Those of you who are new to high intensity strength training will learn the scientific principles behind the method, beginner, intermediate and advanced routines, advanced high intensity training techniques, and how to put it all together into a program that will pack on muscle. Those of you who are already familiar with high intensity strength training will enjoy the many interesting stories Dr. Darden shares about Arthur Jones, Mike and Ray Mentzer, Casey Viator, Sergio Oliva, Arnold Schwarzeneggar and others from the early days at Nautilus and the bodybuilding scene during the 60's and 70's. The New High Intensity Training should be in the library of every serious bodybuilder.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was interesting to me because it said a lot of good things but I the same time I thought this book was outdated. The negative: This book emphazises total body routines. You can build some mass using total body routines but split training builds more mass than total body routines. If you want to get cut and lean this book will give you that since total body routines give you the fit and tone look. If you are wanting to build a lot of mass these routines will not work. I have tried both total body routines and split training and split training is far superior for building mass. The author is in love with total body routines for some reason? I also found him to be in love with Arthur Jones and Casey Viator. The positive: The author covers many ways to increase the intensity of excersises, nothing new but he does a good job of explaining how to increase the intensity by using negatives, compound sets, supersets, slow reps, etc.. He explains well how to piece combinations of excersises together. He also, emphazises low volume, low sets, low number of excersises. I agree that you don't need to use a ton of excersises to get the muscle building job done. Overall, it's worth a read...