New Media, 1740-1915 / Edition 1

New Media, 1740-1915 / Edition 1

by Lisa Gitelman
     
 

Reminding us that all media were once new, this book challenges the notion that to study new media is to study exclusively today's new media. Examining a variety of media in their historic contexts, it explores those moments of transition when new media were not yet fully defined and their significance was still in flux. Examples range from familiar devices such as

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Overview

Reminding us that all media were once new, this book challenges the notion that to study new media is to study exclusively today's new media. Examining a variety of media in their historic contexts, it explores those moments of transition when new media were not yet fully defined and their significance was still in flux. Examples range from familiar devices such as the telephone and phonograph to unfamiliar curiosities such as the physiognotrace and the zograscope.
Moving beyond the story of technological innovation, the book considers emergent media as sites of ongoing cultural exchange. It considers how habits and structures of communication can frame a collective sense of public and private and how they inform our apprehensions of the "real." By recovering different (and past) senses of media in transition, New Media, 1740-1915 promises to deepen our historical understanding of all media and thus to sharpen our critical awareness of how they acquire their meaning and power.

ContributorsWendy Bellion, Erin C.
Blake, Patricia Crain, Ellen Gruber Garvey, Lisa Gitelman, Geoffrey B. Pingree,
Gregory Radick, Laura Burd Schiavo, Katherine Stubbs, Diane Zimmerman Umble, Paul
Young.

The MIT Press

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780262572286
Publisher:
MIT Press
Publication date:
10/01/2004
Series:
Media in Transition
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
305
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.75(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Table of Contents

Series Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introduction: What's New About New Media?
Documents
1Zograscopes, Virtual Reality, and the Mapping of Polite Society in Eighteenth-Century England1
2Heads of State: Profiles and Politics in Jeffersonian America31
3Children of Media, Children as Media: Optical Telegraphs, Indian Pupils, and Joseph Lancaster's System for Cultural Replication61
4Telegraphy's Corporeal Fictions91
5From Phantom Image to Perfect Vision: Physiological Optics, Commercial Photography, and the Popularization of the Stereoscope113
6Sinful Network or Divine Service: Competing Meanings of the Telephone in Amish Country139
7Souvenir Foils: On the Status of Print at the Origin of Recorded Sound157
8R. L. Garner and the Rise of the Edison Phonograph in Evolutionary Philology175
9Scissorizing and Scrapbooks: Nineteenth-Century Reading, Remaking, and Recirculating207
10Media on Display: A Telegraphic History of Early American Cinema229
Contributors265
Index267

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