New Methods of Competing in the Global Marketplace: Critical Success Factors from Service and Manufacturing

Overview

For well over a century, manufacturing has dictated the developmental growth of management in business, mainly in achieving lower costs and higher quality. The strength of the economy, however, continues to move quickly toward the service sector, bringing with it a number of innovative management techniques tailored to customer service operations. Highlighting the value of using contemporary innovations to help achieve success, New Methods of Competing in the Global Marketplace outlines the benefits that ...

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Overview

For well over a century, manufacturing has dictated the developmental growth of management in business, mainly in achieving lower costs and higher quality. The strength of the economy, however, continues to move quickly toward the service sector, bringing with it a number of innovative management techniques tailored to customer service operations. Highlighting the value of using contemporary innovations to help achieve success, New Methods of Competing in the Global Marketplace outlines the benefits that companies can gain by sharing techniques across the manufacturing/services boundary.

Emphasizing the similarities between the two components, the book vividly describes this vanishing boundary and shows how the techniques used in one field can be adapted for effective use in the other. It describes how management and manufacturing programs can be personalized to fit individual needs and can be successfully implemented through technology innovations, infrastructure realignments, and cultural adjustments.

The authors describe the steps necessary to build an integrated supply chain. They present a novel business input-transformation-output (ITO) model that depicts the basic elements of service operations management and explains how managers use a variety of paths to aid them in the decision making and management of their companies. As a manager, you will find a wealth of practical insight that applies to your business. Stressing the need for knowledge management, this book shows that change is necessary for the future success of all types of organizations.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781420051261
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 4/11/2008
  • Series: Resource Management Series , #48
  • Pages: 456
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Table of Contents

The Vanishing Manufacturing/Services Boundary
Differences between Manufacturing and Service
Forces That Are Eliminating the Boundary
Manufacturing Is Adding Services to Be More Customer Focused
Technology Development
A Movement toward a Process Perspective
Outsourcing Focuses More Attention on the Need for Good Service
The Vanishing Manufacturing/Services Boundary
Critical Success Factors and Strategic Planning
What Are Critical Success Factors?
The Evolution of CSFs in the United States
Other Changes during a Country’s Economic Life Cycle
The Need to Be Effective
A Hierarchy of the Planning Process
A Hierarchy of Critical Success Factors
The Role of CSFs in Strategic Planning
The Role of CSFs in Operational Planning
Role of CSFs in Selecting Management Programs
Performance Measurement and CSFs
The ITO Model
The ITO Model
Introduction to Models
The Basic ITO Model—Inputs, Transformation, and Outputs
Extending the Basic ITO Model into Supply Chain Configurations
The Concept of Reverse Logistics
The Role of Management Programs in Continuous Improvement
What Are Management Programs?
Management Program Life Cycles
Why Are Management Programs Important?
Where Do Management Programs Come from?
Why Are Some Programs Successful and Some Not?
Future of Management Programs
How Manufacturing Techniques Are Being Adapted to Service Operations
Introduction
Description of Manufacturing Process Types
Product–Process Relationship
Service Industry Classifications
Comparison of Manufacturing and Services
Manufacturing Objectives
Service Objectives
Programs That Work in Services
Programs More Difficult to Adapt to Service Operations
Keys to Extending Manufacturing Techniques to Services
How Service Techniques Are Being Extended to Manufacturing
Introduction
What Are Services?
Knowledge Transfer from Services to Manufacturing
Examples of Programs Developed in Services
Response Time Reduction
Flexibility
Interorganizational Communications
Other Service Developments
The Role of Technology in Continuous Improvement
Definitions
The Role of Technology in Continuous Improvement
Technology for Process Improvement
Technology for Resource Enhancement
Criteria Used in Decision Making
Steps in Adding Technology to the Process
Future Considerations for Technology
The Role of Infrastructure in Continuous Improvement
What Is Infrastructure?
Strategies
The Four Classical Management Functions
Organization Structure
Alternate Organizational Structures
Trends in Organizational Structures
The Role of the Internet in Changing Organizational Structure
The Integration of Knowledge Management into Organizational Structure
Does Your Business Need a Change in Its Infrastructure?
Understanding Organizational Culture—the Elusive Key to Change
Introduction
What Is Organizational Culture?
Why Is Organizational Culture so Important?
What Are the Components of Organizational Culture?
What Types of Organizational Culture Are There?
Changing Organizational Culture
Integrated Supply Chains from Dream to Reality
Introduction
Setting the Stage
Supply Chain Models
Steps to Achieve a Lean and Agile Supply Chain
Steps in the Change Process
A Look Ahead
The Role of Services to Complement the Supply Chain
Introduction
What Are Producer Services?
What Are Social Services?
What Are Consumer Services?
Integrated Service Package
The Future of Improvement Programs
Introduction
The Background to Improvement Programs
Future Areas of Emphasis
Future of Improvement Programs
The Drivers of Change
Most Likely Future Methodologies
Most Likely Improvement Programs
Industries Most Likely to Stress Continuous Improvement
Knowledge Management: Where Does It Fit?
Index
A Summary and References appear at the end of most chapters.

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