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New Organizational Wealth: Managing and Measuring Knowledge-Based Assets

Overview

New strategies for business success based on shifting the focus from information to knowledge
— Fifty percent of the fastest-growing companies in the U.S. can be described as "knowledge companies" — those that employ highly skilled, highly educated people who sell their knowledge rather than products
— Provides tools for measuring intangible assets such as competent and creative employees, patents, brand ...

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Overview

New strategies for business success based on shifting the focus from information to knowledge
— Fifty percent of the fastest-growing companies in the U.S. can be described as "knowledge companies" — those that employ highly skilled, highly educated people who sell their knowledge rather than products
— Provides tools for measuring intangible assets such as competent and creative employees, patents, brand names, and company reputation
— Some archetypal knowledge companies are consultancy firms, advertising agencies, software companies, and architecture firms

Few of today's companies improve performance through knowledge or learning. This is because few managers understand how to make a business of knowledge. They focus on explicit knowledge — information — instead of implicit human knowledge. Investing in information technology instead of in people, they only know how to measure performance in money.

This ground-breaking book offers practical advice and rules of thumb for designing a business strategy that focuses on knowledge as an intangible asset. It begins by outlining the differences between information-focused strategies (such as adding chips to a manufacturer's product line) and knowledge-focused strategies (such as seeking returns in long term customer relationships, ideas and learning, and research and development). Measuring the knowledge-based assets of a company explains why, for example, Microsoft is valued at 40 times its worth on paper.

In eight chapters, Sveiby assembles a veritable toolbox of knowledge-based management techniques to enable managers to meet the new business challenges of the coming century.

This groundbreaking book offers practical advice and rules of thumb for designing a business strategy that focuses on knowledge as an intangible asset. In eight chapters, Sveiby assembles a veritable toolbox of knowledge-based management techniques to enable managers to meet the new business challenges of the coming century. 28 charts; 16 tables. 275 pp. $40,000 marketing & publicity budget.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
A summation of nearly 15 years of work and experience by one of the best authors on the subject of managing the intangible, knowledge-based assets of a company. Sveiby's division of these intangible assets into three main categories employee competence, internal structure, and external structure is a useful approach. His book is packed with ideas and is clearly written. Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Booknews
Offers managers a conceptual framework for identifying a company's assets that do not appear on the financial balance sheet, including employee's talents and strengths, customers' support and interest, and suppliers' reliability and ingenuity. Explains how to monitor them and translate them into financial gain, and cites case studies of companies that have publicly reported such assets and been rewarded with higher stock prices. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781576750148
  • Publisher: Berrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc.
  • Publication date: 1/28/1997
  • Pages: 275
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface
Pt. 1 The Era of the Knowledge Organization 1
Ch. 1 The New Wealth: Intangible Assets 3
Ch. 2 Tapping into the Limitless Resources of the Knowledge Era 19
Ch. 3 What is Knowledge? What is Competence? 29
Ch. 4 The Key Activity in Knowledge Organizations: Transferring Knowledge 40
Pt. 2 Managing Intangible Assets 51
Ch. 5 The Four Power Players in the Knowledge Organization 53
Ch. 6 Keys to Developing and Utilizing Professional Competence 65
Ch. 7 Building Internal Structure to Support Knowledge Transfer 78
Ch. 8 Improving Efficiency and Effectiveness through Internal Structure 95
Ch. 9 Managing External Structures to Maximize Knowledge Assets 108
Ch. 10 Comparing Knowledge-Focused and Information-Focused Strategies 129
Pt. 3 Measuring Intangible Assets 149
Ch. 11 The State of the Art of Measuring Intangible Assets 151
Ch. 12 Measuring Competence, Internal Structure, and External Structure 163
Ch. 13 Implementing Systems for Measuring Intangible Assets 185
Notes 203
References 206
Index 211
About the Author 219
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