New Orleans con Sabor Latino: The History and Passion of Latino Cooking

New Orleans con Sabor Latino: The History and Passion of Latino Cooking

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by Zella Palmer Cuadra
     
 

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New Orleans con Sabor Latino is a documentary cookbook that draws on the rich Latino culture and history of New Orleans by focusing on thirteen New Orleanian Latinos from diverse backgrounds. Their stories are compelling and reveal what for too long has been overlooked. The book celebrates the influence of Latino cuisine on the food culture of New Orleans

Overview

New Orleans con Sabor Latino is a documentary cookbook that draws on the rich Latino culture and history of New Orleans by focusing on thirteen New Orleanian Latinos from diverse backgrounds. Their stories are compelling and reveal what for too long has been overlooked. The book celebrates the influence of Latino cuisine on the food culture of New Orleans from the eighteenth century to the influx of Latino migration post-Katrina and up to today. From farmers' markets, finedining restaurants, street cart vendors, and home cooks, there isn't a part of the food industry that has been left untouched by this fusion of cultures.

Zella Palmer Cuadra visited and interviewed each creator. Each dish is placed in historical context and is presented in full-color images, along with photographs of the cooks. Latino culture has left an indelible mark on classic New Orleans cuisine and its history, and now this contribution is celebrated and recognized in this beautifully illustrated volume.

The cookbook includes a lagniappe (something extra) section of New Orleans recipes from a Latin perspective. Such creations as seafood paella with shrimp boudin, Puerto Rican po'boy (jibarito) with grillades, and Cuban chicken soup bring to life this delicious mix of traditional recipes and new flavors.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"New Orleans con Sabor Latino is an intriguing guide to Latino-style southern hospitality. All the ingredients are there for a go-to book when you want your party to say 'mi casa es su casa.' As a fellow Latino chef in the South, I am inspired by Adolfo Garcia and others like him who combine heritage with a sense of place."

—Anthony Lamas, executive chef/owner of Seviche in Louisville, Kentucky

"Zella Palmer Cuadra captures the vibrant present of Latino cooking in New Orleans, which like all things in New Orleans, has become happily Creolized by the flavors of the city. Natalie Root's inviting photographs reflect the energy of the people and the complexity of the food. What is most important are the historical connections that Cuadra establishes to the Spanish colonial period—actually longer than the French—of the city, the shared Caribbean heritage, and the web of Latino influences on the food of New Orleans. Tasting New Orleans as a Caribbean, Latino, and American city is just another way to understand the many nuances that make the food of the city unique. Good context, representative people, excellent photos, and imaginative recipes: this book should be open on the counter in your kitchen."

—Elizabeth Williams, president and CEO of the SoFAB Institute (home of the Southern Food and Beverage Museum in New Orleans), lawyer, and author of New Orleans: A Food Biography

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781617038969
Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
Publication date:
09/20/2013
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
160
File size:
10 MB

Meet the Author


Zella Palmer Cuadra, New Orleans, Louisiana, is a curator, cook, culinary historian, and writer. She has curated or collaborated on exhibits at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum and the Newcomb Art Gallery in New Orleans and DuSable Museum in Chicago. She is also editor-in-chief of Poize Magazine.

Natalie Root, New Orleans, Louisiana, a food photographer, has published in several regional publications, including the cookbook Simply Suppers by Chef Jennifer Chandler. She created New Orleans Fare, a series of iconic photographs that exemplify the city's unique culinary culture.

Adolfo Garcia, New Orleans, Louisiana, is chef and owner of New Orleans restaurants RioMar, La Boca, a Mano, and Gusto. He has been named a James Beard semifinalist and one of the top eight Latin chefs in the country by Hispanic Magazine.

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New Orleans con Sabor Latino: The History and Passion of Latino Cooking 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
InspirationalAngel531 More than 1 year ago
Title: New Orleans con Sabor Latino The History and Passion of Latino Cooking Author: Zella Llerena Publisher: University Press Of Mississippi Published: 11-5-2014 ISBN: 9781617038952 E-Book: B00EB8XHA2 Pages: 153 Genre: Food and Wine Tags: Cooking Overall Rating: Excellent Reviewed For: NetGalley Reviewer: DelAnne When we think of the foods of New Orleans, Latino cuisine is not the first thing to come to mind. French or Creole yes, but not Latino. As you read "New Orleans con Sabor Latino The History and Passion of Latino" you will find that an influx of Latino immigrants during the 1700's, 1800's and early 1900's. These very same immigrants also brought an Latino infusion to the local culinary cuisine. Zella Llerena tells how the people of diverse Latino cultures each brought individual touches to the food enjoyed in NOLA (New Orleans, Louisianna). She goes on to give us some of the most delicious recipes from numerous chef's of all ages and their personal stories. Zella Llerena's "New Orleans con Sabor Latino The History and Passion of Latino" is so much more than a cookbook. It is also part history and memoir and a gift of love. Come and bask in her love of her own culture and its roots and changes with the passing of time. Like me you will find a few culinary surprises that will quickly find their way into your favorite recipes box (I really to do have a huge recipe box filled with most of my favorite recipes from family, friends, strangers and various cookbooks I have read. My cousin has two great big binders.) Which recipes made it into my box? Edgar M Sierra Jimenez' Flan de Cafe Brulot (my mother fell in love with Flan during her many visits into Mexico), Nancy Gonsalves' New Orleans-style Tamales (Which I learned to love and make from a friend's mother while visiting with his family in Nogales.) Then there was Rueben Leite's Pineapple Pork Taco's (How brilliant, pineapple and pork in a taco, this one was the first one I tried because of the name. I can gorge myself on pineapple.) This last one called to me telling me it had to be added to my personal collection of favorites because it was going to grow on me until I craved it. It was right. Tres Leche Bread Pudding, I will admit I changed the topping from mango to plantain as I am allergic to mango. There is much to enjoy as you read this cookbook so pick up a copy for yourself.