New Shoes for Silvia

Overview

Silvia can't wait to try on her present from Tia Rosita: new shoes as red as the inside of a watermelon. The shoes are too big for Silvia to wear — but that doesn't stop her from dinfing lots of ways to enjoy them while she waits for her feet to grow!

"The excitement of the new shoes and the formidable task of waiting to grow into them are both conveyed beautifully through the story and the art....Watercolors fill each page with the details of life in Silvia's home and small village....Hurwitz perfectly captures ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (24) from $1.99   
  • New (9) from $9.90   
  • Used (15) from $1.99   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Silvia can't wait to try on her present from Tia Rosita: new shoes as red as the inside of a watermelon. The shoes are too big for Silvia to wear — but that doesn't stop her from dinfing lots of ways to enjoy them while she waits for her feet to grow!

"The excitement of the new shoes and the formidable task of waiting to grow into them are both conveyed beautifully through the story and the art....Watercolors fill each page with the details of life in Silvia's home and small village....Hurwitz perfectly captures the pleasure of a special gifted the difficulty of waiting."—Horn Book

Speaks universally to the imagination and emotions."—School Library Journal

A young girl receives a pair of beautiful red shoes from her Tia Rosita and finds different uses for them until she grows enough for them to fit.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
A Latin American locale brings the only dash of picante to this rather bland slice of life. From ``another America,'' Tia Rosita sends Silvia a pair of shiny red shoes, which are too big. Day after day, Silvia anxiously tries them on to see if she has grown into them. She hasn't, but she enjoys the shoes anyway, pretending they are doll beds or a two-car train. Eventually, distracted by chores and friends, Silvia forgets about the shoes for weeks at a stretch, until, finally, she tries them on again and they fit. In contrast to this pedestrian story, the watercolor illustrations rise well above the ordinary. Pinkney, paying careful attention to the foreign milieu, achieves an upbeat, child-pleasing realism. Ages 4-up. (Sept.)
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2-Silvia, who lives in ``another America''-presumably South America-is thrilled when her family receives a package from Ta Rosita. Inside is a pair of beautiful red shoes just for her. Alas, they are too big, and the little girl is not patient. She makes them into beds, train cars, and carts for her dolls. She keeps trying them on, but finally forgets about them. Then one day, when her mother is writing a letter to Ta Rosita, Silvia remembers them, dusts them off, and finds that they fit perfectly. This simple story, told in spare prose, speaks universally to the imagination and emotions. Pinkney's spirited watercolors animate the narrative and are large enough for group sharing. This could be paired with Denise Lewis Patrick's Red Dancing Shoes (Tambourine, 1993), another story about a vivacious child and her special shoes.-Ann Welton, Terminal Park Elementary School, Auburn, WA
Janice Del Negro
"Once, far away in another America, a package arrived at the post office." Tia Rosita has sent Silvia a new pair of red shoes, and Silvia can't wait to wear them. But wait she must, because they are too big. She uses them for doll beds one week, as a two-car train the next, as holders for the shells and stones she collects at the beach the next, until, finally, they fit. "Mira, mira," she cries, running to show Mama and the baby. "Look, look. My shoes are not too big now." Silvia is an attractive child about five years old, and the story hinges on her excitement about her present and her imaginative response to it. The slight story is made stronger by Pinkney's watercolors, which warmly depict a close family life in a wholesome, often outdoor setting in Latin America.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780688052867
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 9/28/1993
  • Pages: 1
  • Sales rank: 249,684
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Lexile: 640L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 9.00 (w) x 11.00 (h) x 0.25 (d)

Meet the Author

Johanna Hurwitz is the award-winning author of more than sixty popular books for young readers, including Faraway Summer; Dear Emma; Elisa Michaels, Bigger & Better; Class Clown; Fourth-Grade Fuss; and Rip-Roaring Russell, an American Library Association Notable Book. Her work has won many child-chosen state awards. A former school librarian, she frequently visits schools around the country to talk about her books. Mrs. Hurwitz and her husband divide their time between Great Neck, New York, and Wilmington, Vermont.

Jerry Pinkney is the illustrator of more than a hundred books for children. A five-time winner of both the Caldecott Honor and the Coretta Scott King Award, he has been recognized with numerous other honors, taught illustration and conducted workshops at universities across the country, and created art for the United States Postal Service's Black Heritage stamps. Books Mr. Pinkney has illustrated include The Ugly Duckling, John Henry, The Nightingale, and Noah's Ark. The father of four grown children, he lives and works in Croton-on-Hudson, New York, in a nineteenth-century carriage house with his wife, author Gloria Jean.

In His Own Words...

"I grew up in a small house in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. I was a middle child of six. I started drawing as far back as I can remember, at the age of four or five. My brothers drew, and I guess in a way I was mimicking them. I found I enjoyed the act of putting marks on paper. It gave me a way of creating my own space and quiet time, as well as a way of expressing myself. You can imagine six children competing for attention and to be heard. I would sit, watching and drawing.

"In first grade I had the opportunity to draw a large picture of a fire engine on the blackboard. I was complimented and encouraged to draw more. The attention felt good, and I wanted more. I was not a terrific reader or adept speller in my growing-up years, and I felt insecure in those areas. Drawing helped me build my self-esteem and feel good about myself, and, with hard work, I graduated from elementary school with honors.

"I attended an all-black elementary school, and I gained a strong sense of self and an appreciation of my own culture there. But Roosevelt Junior High was integrated. There I had many friends, both white and black, at a time when there was little mixing socially in school. There the spark for my curiosity about people was lit. You can see this interest and fascination with people of different cultures throughout my work.

"My formal art training started at Dobbins Vocational High School, and upon graduation I received a scholarship to the Philadelphia Museum College of Art. My major was advertising and design. The most exciting classes for me were drawing, painting, and printmaking. It is no wonder I turned to illustrating and designing books. For me the book represents the ultimate in graphics: first, as a designer, considering space, page size, number of pages, and type size; then, as an illustrator, dealing with the aesthetics of line, color, and form.

"There were three books that somehow magically came into my possession in the early sixties: The Wind in the Wows, illustrated by Arthur Rackham; The Wonder Clock, illustrated by Howard Pyle; and Rain Makes Applesauce, illustrated by Marvin Bileck. You can see those influences in my art today. Later, my work was greatly influenced by such African American artists as Charles White, Romare Bearden, and Jacob Lawrence.

"From the very beginning of my career in illustrating books, research has been important. I do as much as possible on a given subject, so that I live the experience and have a vision of the people and places. To capture a sense of realism for characters in my work, I use models that resemble the people I want to portray. My wife, Gloria Jean (also an author), and I keep a closetful of old clothes to dress up the models, and I have the models act out the story. Photos are taken to aid me in better understanding body language and facial expressions. Once I have that photo in front of me I have freedom, because the more you know, the more you can be inventive.

"For illustrating stories about animals, I keep a large reference file of over a hundred books on nature and animals. The first step in envisioning a creature is for me to pretend to be that particular animal. I think about its size and the sounds it makes, how it moves (slowly or quickly), and where it lives. I try to capture the feeling of the creature, as well as its true-to-life characteristics. There are times when the stories call for the animals to be anthropomorphic, and I've used photographs of myself posing as the animal characters.

"It still amazes me how much the projects I have illustrated have given back to me in terms of personal and artistic satisfaction. They have given me the opportunity to use my imagination, to draw, to paint, to travel through the voices of the characters in the stories, and, above all else, to touch children."

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)