New Socks
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New Socks

3.5 2
by Bob Shea
     
 

Something new can change the way you look; it can change the way you feel; and, in the case of new socks, it can change the way you walk—especially if you're a chicken. With a quirky sense of humor, retro style, and hip attitude, Bob Shea captures the excitement one irresistible chick experiences when he puts on a brand new pair of socks.

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Overview

Something new can change the way you look; it can change the way you feel; and, in the case of new socks, it can change the way you walk—especially if you're a chicken. With a quirky sense of humor, retro style, and hip attitude, Bob Shea captures the excitement one irresistible chick experiences when he puts on a brand new pair of socks.

This is for readers who have decided that they can wear nothing but their superman capes or tutus or have discovered that the only food worth eating is macoroni and cheese. In other words, this book is told with "kid logic" and it embraces the affection we have for things when they're brand new.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Slick digital design and silly antics rule the roost in this paper-over-board celebration of footwear, narrated by an excitable young chicken. "Notice anything different about me?" the peep asks. "Nope, it's not my glasses," he adds, pointing the squiggly line of his wing at the heavy black frames around his black-dot eyes. A close-up of his feet reveals two reasons for his apparent delight: "I got New Socks!" Where the chick's yellow body is a double-yolk kidney bean shape, with black sticks for legs and just a hint of chatty beak, his bulbous orange socks look like inflated moon boots, with a star-shaped sparkle on one toe to indicate their pristine condition. The chick skates across a wood floor and, at the playground, calls out, "Watch me not be scared on the big-kids slide! In New Socks!" Graphic designer Shea uses animation techniques akin to Mo Willems, from emphatic first-person statements to iconic illustrations to near-empty backdrops of minimalist white and robin's-egg-blue. This comic sequence holds up as an exercise in dynamic layout, but like its title product, it seems unlikely to seem fresh after repeated use. Ages 3-6. (Apr.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Children's Literature - Gwen Vanderhage
A little chick named Leon wants to show you something new. Is it his glasses? No! It is his great new socks! They are orange, they slide on hardwood floors, and they help make Leon brave on the big kids' slide. Leon thinks the socks can help him do anything. When the President calls and invites Leon to the White House, it seals the deal. Now Leon cannot wait to get new pants too! Simple, three-color digital graphics are vivid and eye-catching and give the book a retro feel. While the pictures and text convey obvious enthusiasm, that is as far as this book goes. The disconnected and overwrought incidents may amuse adults, but kids might not sit through the whole thing or ask for a repeat telling. Similar in design and attitude to Mo Willems's Pigeon books, the chick central to Bob Shea's first foray into picture books lacks the humor and sparkle that make Willems's books so fun for kids. Rather, this title has the feel of an art school assignment, with the text inserted as an afterthought.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780316013574
Publisher:
Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
04/01/2007
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
9.25(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.37(d)
Age Range:
3 - 5 Years

Meet the Author

Bob Shea has worked extensively with PBS Kids and Comedy Central, and is now a freelance art director for Nickelodeon. He lives with his wife and son in Connecticut.

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New Socks 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
BeckyZeeDub More than 1 year ago
I wouldn't say it's an educational tool by any means, but it's bright illustrations are perfect to keep a baby's attention! What is even better is that it's an exceptional children's book for a good span of age. It will keep a one year old completely engaged - but it's also good for a five year old learning to read. Great gift-giver!