New Stories from the South: The Year's Best 1987

Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (12) from $1.99   
  • Used (12) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 2
Showing 1 – 10 of 12 (2 pages)
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$1.99
Seller since 2006

Feedback rating:

(60961)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

Very Good
Great condition for a used book! Minimal wear. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Shipped to over one million happy customers. Your purchase benefits world literacy!

Ships from: Mishawaka, IN

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$1.99
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(11084)

Condition: Good
Book shows minor use. Cover and Binding have minimal wear and the pages have only minimal creases. A tradition of southern quality and service. All books guaranteed at the Atlanta ... Book Company. Our mailers are 100% recyclable. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Atlanta, GA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$1.99
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(16239)

Condition: Good
Algonquin Books, 09/01/1988, Hardcover, Good condition. Very Good dust jacket.

Ships from: Frederick, MD

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$2.39
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(3725)

Condition: Good
01/09/1988 Hardcover Used-Good Book in good or better condition. Dispatched same day from US or UK warehouse.

Ships from: Valley Cottage, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$3.82
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(107)

Condition: Good
1988-09 Hardcover Good Hardback with dust jacket in great condition. Few light spots on fore edge.

Ships from: Vinemont, AL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$6.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(5)

Condition: Like New
1987 Hard cover Fine in fine dust jacket. 247 p. Audience: General/trade.

Ships from: opelika, AL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$11.50
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(0)

Condition: Very Good
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 1987 Hard Cover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket 0912697660. A nice bright, tight copy, clean and unmarked inside and out, with no creased or torn ... pages, in a light gray cloth binding; top corners bumped and a very gentle bump to head of spine, o/w book shows no defects; dust jacket is clean and bright, with only minor wear. 247 pp. The 1987 edition of an annual series of outstanding short stories about the American South.; 6 1/4 x 9 1/4 inches. Read more Show Less

Ships from: High Point, NC

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$12.99
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(6)

Condition: Like New
New York, New York, U.S.A. 1987 Hard Cover First Edition, First Printing Fine in Fine jacket Fine, Pages clean and bright. Binding tight, Cover clean, Dust Jacket clean, ... unchipped, unclipped. Remainder mark, no shelf wear, no surprises. Same day shping. ! Read more Show Less

Ships from: Vauxhall, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$20.30
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(140)

Condition: Like New
CHAPEL HILL 1987 HardBOUND FIRST EDITION Fine in Fine jacket LEE SMITH. OCTAVO. SIGNED BY LEE SMITH THIS IS A BEAUTIFUL HARDBOUND FIRST EDITION IN FINE DJ OF THIS SCARCE AND ... IMPORTANT VOLUME....NEW STORIES FROM THE SOUTH....THE YEARS BEST 1987...EDITED BY SHANNON RAVENEL...NEARLY 250 PAGES OF STORIES BY VARIOUS SOUTHERN WRITERS...SUCH AS BUT NOT LIMITED TO LEE SMITH, ; LOUIS NORDAN...ROSANNE COGGESHALL, VICKI COVINGTON AND OTHERS....THIS COPY HAS BEEN SIGNED AND INSCRIBED BY LEE SMITH AS FOLLOWS....." FOR.......FROM LEE, MARCH 22, 1994 CHAPEL HILL....A BEAUTIFUL COPY.... Read more Show Less

Ships from: Johnson City, TN

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$25.00
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(19)

Condition: Like New
Book and dust jacket are both brand new. All book prices include a new mylar dust jacket cover.

Ships from: Chicago, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 2
Showing 1 – 10 of 12 (2 pages)
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In this collection of short stories from the South, there are narratives told from a child's point of view, strong women, and characters who drink heavily and have religious visions. In the introduction, editor Ravenel notes that she selected tales told in voices that are ``at once familiar and urgent.'' Indeed, the writers do, as Ravenel hopes, ``grab readers by the scruff of the neck and hold tight.'' In Peggy Payne's ``The Pure in Heart,'' it is hard not to be drawn to the university minister who feels obligated to tell his congregants that he has heard God's voicealthough he fears being consigned to the sort of church that has a marquee with a tally of the number of souls saved on a Sunday. In ``Where Pelham Fell,'' Bob Shacochis exposes the sensibilities of an aging colonel lost in memory, his weary wife and a perspicacious black farmer. In these stories, even the smallest of well-made sentences demonstrates a loyalty to the virtues of the best Southern prose. (September)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780912697666
  • Publisher: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill
  • Publication date: 9/1/1987
  • Pages: 264

Read an Excerpt

New Stories from the South

The Year's Best, 1987
By Shannon Ravenel

Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill

Copyright © 1987 Shannon Ravenel
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0912697733


Preface


Letter from Sister--What We Learned at the P.O.


I have a theory--perhaps unformed and, without question, unsubstantiated--that most bad Southern writing is descended directly from Eudora Welty"s "Why I Live at the P.O." Welty"s story smacks of a certain now-familiar sensibility, rife with caricature, overstated eccentricity, and broadly drawn humor, that has come to represent Southern writing and, through that representation, the South itself.

It would be difÞcult, if not impossible, to read much Southern Þction and not come upon story after story faithfully cut from our landscape and culture, using the template provided by Welty in 1941. The characters in "Why I Live at the P.O." possess the prototypical, colorful Southern names that, in the musical sound of their regional speciÞcity, have come to promise colorful Southern doings: Papa-Daddy, Uncle Rondo, Stella-Rondo, Shirley-T., Sister. They eat green-tomato pickle and, on the Fourth of July, sport about in þesh-colored kimonos while impaired by prescription drugs. They live in Mississippi. They grow long beards and illegitimate children and mismatched sets of breasts.

In delicious, honey-coated accents they utter the delicious, honey-coated statements, void of any real importance, that fall sweetly on the ears of book-buying lovers of stereotype everywhere. "Papa-Daddy," Stella-Rondo says, when she"s looking to stir up trouble, "Papa-Daddy! . . . Sister says she fails to understand why you don"t cut off your beard." Uncle Rondo, after he has donned Stella-Rondo"s þesh-colored kimono and illegally ingested God knows what prescription narcotic (he"s a pharmacist), cries, "Sister, get out of my way, I"m poisoned."

So faithfully have the conventions of "Why I Live at the P.O." been copied by succeeding generations of writers, so dominant has the regionally identiÞed literature laid out by the story become, that Welty might well have titled it "How to Exploit the People of the Nation"s Poorest Region and Get a Really Big Book Advance." All of which is at least shameful, if not artistically criminal, because "Why I Live at the P.O." is a bona Þde work of genius, not only one of the best short stories produced by a Southern writer, but one of the best stories by any writer, anywhere.

The genius of "Why I Live at the P.O." lies not in the story that the narrator, Sister, tells us--which is, without question, broadly told, colorful, eccentric, and side-splittingly funny--but in the story Sister does not know she is telling us. In her hysterical attempt to win us over to her side in a seemingly inconsequential family dispute, Sister inadvertently reveals the emotional and spiritual burdens that she and the members of her family must pull through their lives. Stella-Rondo has been abandoned by a traveling salesman who might or might not be her husband, leaving her to raise a daughter who might or might not be illegitimate. Uncle Rondo is a shell-shocked veteran of World War I who once had a breakdown because one of his nieces broke a chain letter from Flanders Field. Mama is a tired woman--a widow, one presumes--who knows that she must spend the rest of her days caring for and keeping peace among, the rapidly aging daughters she can"t marry off; her senile father; and her shell-shocked, drug-addled brother. Papa-Daddy"s rages are directed not so much at Sister, but at what a colorful writer who wasn"t from around here famously called the "dying of the light" (Sister tells us he"s "just about a million years old").

And Sister, poor Sister. She thinks she is simply justifying to us her reasons for choosing to live in the second smallest post ofÞce in the state of Mississippi. But what she doesn"t know she is telling us is that she is horribly alone, that she realizes she will spend the rest of her life in a tiny, tiny place, with no chance of escape, unloved and unmarried, dependent upon the charity of her family. Her monologue to us, unbeknownst to her, is at once a comedic tour de force and a heartrending cry in the wilderness.

While these aren"t new critical insights, they are, I think, important ones. The bright surface of "Why I Live at the P.O." is so extraordinarily attractive that it is easy to see why it has been so often imitated. But it is also easy to see why, if only the surface of Welty"s story is imitated, the result is but a shallow and often exploitative parody of a great work of art. It is easy to make up characters who live in double-wide mobile homes, wear beehive hairdos and feed caps, never put a g on the end of a participle, have sex with their cousins, voted for George Wallace; who squint and spit whenever an out-of-towner uses a polysyllabic word; who aspire only to own a bass boat, scare a Yankee, have sex with their cousins again, burn a cross, eat something fried, speak in tongues, do anything butt nekkid, be a guest on a daytime talk show, and make the next payment on a satellite dish that points toward Venus and picks up 456 separate channels on a clear day. What is difÞcult is to take the poor, the uneducated, the superstitious, the backward, the redneck, the "trailer-trash," and make them real human beings, with hopes and dreams and aspirations as real and valid, and as worthy of our fair consideration, as any Cheeverian Westchester County housewife.

While I can forgive our brothers and sisters from other parts of the country for taking pleasure in, or even creating, a Southern literature based on stereotype, I Þnd it harder to forgive Southerners who do the same thing, particularly if they are capable of writing with greater understanding but choose not to. What Welty"s more cynical impersonators* choose to ignore is that the eccentricities portrayed in "Why I Live at the P.O." are character-speciÞc and not indicative of any larger pattern of regional or cultural behavior or belief. The humor in the words Uncle Rondo arises not from the words themselves, but from the way Sister says them.

While the sound of Sister"s voice has become the matriarch of all the shrill, self-absorbed voices we hear in Southern Þction, yammering on about nothing at all, we should remember that her voice is also one of agenda and calculation. Sister wants to make her family look bad; she wants us to believe that they are stupid and that, in their stupidity, they have treated her unfairly. What worries me is the possibility that Sister"s voice, with all its layers of complexity, will become lost in the din raised by its imitators, and that din will become, if it hasn"t already, the only voice we hear in our heads when we think about the nature of the word Southern.

I am often asked if I consider myself a Southern writer, and, to be honest, my answer depends on--to borrow a line from Owen Wister"s Virginian, one of the most famously one-dimensional Southern stereotypes--whether or not my questioner smiles when he calls me that. If he means, do I make fun of my characters because they are Southern and because there is a bottomless market for that sort of thing, then the answer is no. But if he means, do I consider myself someone who at least attempts to portray the people of my native region in all their complexity and diversity and Christ-hauntedness and moral ambiguity, the answer is yes, I consider myself a Southern writer.

And as a Southern writer--even one who tends to be as thin-skinned, testy, and self-righteous about this issue as I am--I have been tempted to lower the IQs of my characters, name them Something-or-Other Bob, and stick their illiterate backsides to a Naugahyde La-Z-Boy in order to make myself popular and sell some books. The real danger arises when too many of us at once give in to this invidious urge. In creating our own literature, a Southern literature, we often go for the quick laugh, the easy buck, the cardboard character. When we do that, we eat away the foundation of that literature from the inside. My fear is that, eventually, because of our willingness to feed on, without replacing, the tenets and traditions and subjects given to us by our predecessors--Welty, Flannery O"Connor, and William Faulkner most prominent among them--Southern writing will collapse and bury all of us, leaving only kudzu, grits, and a certain vaguely familiar voice to mark the spot.

Continues...


Excerpted from New Stories from the South by Shannon Ravenel Copyright © 1987 by Shannon Ravenel. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)