The New Strawbale Home

The New Strawbale Home

by Catherine Wanek
     
 

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The New Strawbale Home compiles flor plans and images from forty cutting-edge homes across North America, from California to Quebec, New Mexico to New England, showcasing a spectrum of regional styles and personal aesthetic choices. This practical guide discusses varying climate considerations and essential design details for problem-free construction and low…  See more details below

Overview

The New Strawbale Home compiles flor plans and images from forty cutting-edge homes across North America, from California to Quebec, New Mexico to New England, showcasing a spectrum of regional styles and personal aesthetic choices. This practical guide discusses varying climate considerations and essential design details for problem-free construction and low maintenance, and also points out the ecologically friendly, energy-saving aspects of strawbale construction.

Editorial Reviews

San Diego Union-Tribune
An attractive new book...The New Strawbale Home...[has] color photos of 41 straw-bale homes from California to Vermont and from Canada to New Mexico, and contains lively interviews with their owner-builders and architects.
Fort Worth Star-Telegram
Wanek's informative and handsome new coffee-table book profiles
40 residences across the United States and Canada, most built during the past decade's straw-bale renaissance.
The Last Straw Journal
...a beautiful coffee table (or workshop table!) book…both inspiring and practical.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781423606574
Publisher:
Smith, Gibbs Publisher
Publication date:
09/01/2009
Pages:
192
Product dimensions:
8.40(w) x 10.70(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range:
16 Years

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

Historical Precedents Building with bales began over a century ago as pioneers began to settle in the sand hills of Nebraska. Finding themselves in a sea of grass on a treeless prairie, they utilized the relatively new technology of horse-powered baling machines to create a stable building block from an abundant local resource. By simply stacking up interlocking bales and plastering them with mud or cement stucco to create sturdy homes, the pioneers saved their precious trees for roof structures.

But as soon as railroads came through, bringing brick and timber and other supplies, Nebraskans began building "real" homes, and strawbale houses faded into history. Enough examples of strawbale construction survive, however, to give modern builders evidence of durability and confidence in the structural stability of bales.

Meet the Author

Author and photographer Catherine Wanek organized the building of a straw bale greenhouse in 1992 and has been an advocate for straw bale construction ever since. She produced and directed the Building with Straw video series, and spent nearly five years publishing and editing The Last Straw Journal. Her first book, The Art of Natural Building, was published in 2002. Wanek lives in Kingston, New Mexico

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