Overview


During the 1960s and 1970s, a cadre of poets, playwrights, visual artists, musicians, and other visionaries came together to create a renaissance in African American literature and art. This charged chapter in the history of African American culture?which came to be known as the Black Arts Movement?has remained largely neglected by subsequent generations of critics. New Thoughts on the Black Arts Movement includes essays that reexamine well-known figures such as Amiri Baraka, Larry Neal, Gwendolyn Brooks, Sonia ...
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New Thoughts on the Black Arts Movement

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Overview


During the 1960s and 1970s, a cadre of poets, playwrights, visual artists, musicians, and other visionaries came together to create a renaissance in African American literature and art. This charged chapter in the history of African American culture—which came to be known as the Black Arts Movement—has remained largely neglected by subsequent generations of critics. New Thoughts on the Black Arts Movement includes essays that reexamine well-known figures such as Amiri Baraka, Larry Neal, Gwendolyn Brooks, Sonia Sanchez, Betye Saar, Jeff Donaldson, and Haki Madhubuti. In addition, the anthology expands the scope of the movement by offering essays that explore the racial and sexual politics of the era, links with other period cultural movements, the arts in prison, the role of Black colleges and universities, gender politics and the rise of feminism, color fetishism, photography, music, and more. An invigorating look at a movement that has long begged for reexamination, this collection lucidly interprets the complex debates that surround this tumultuous era and demonstrates that the celebration of this movement need not be separated from its critique.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780813541075
  • Publisher: Rutgers University Press
  • Publication date: 5/16/2006
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 406
  • Sales rank: 539,269
  • File size: 5 MB

Meet the Author


LISA GAIL COLLINS is an associate professor in art history and Africana studies on the Class of 1951 Chair at Vassar College. She is the author of The Art of History: African American Women Artists Engage the Past and Art by African-American Artists: Selections from the 20th Century.  She is also coauthor (with Lisa Mintz Messinger) of African-American Artists, 1929–1945: Prints, Drawings, and Paintings in The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

MARGO NATALIE CRAWFORD is an assistant professor of African American literature and culture in the department of English at Indiana University. She is the author of the forthcoming titles Rewriting Blackness: Beyond Authenticity and Hybridity and Mother to Son: Gwendolyn Brooks and Haki Madhubuti.

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Table of Contents

Introduction : power to the people! : the art of black power 1
1 Black light on the Wall of Respect : the Chicago black arts movement 23
2 Black west, thoughts on art in Los Angeles 43
3 The black arts movement and historically black colleges and universities 75
4 A question of relevancy : New York museums and the black arts movement, 1968-1971 92
5 Blackness in present future tense : Broadside Press, Motown Records, and Detroit Techno 117
6 A Black Mass as black Gothic : myth and bioscience in black cultural nationalism 137
7 Natural black beauty and black drag 154
8 Sexual subversions, political inversions : women's poetry and the politics of the black arts movement 173
9 Transcending the fixity of race : the Kamoinge workshop and the question of a "black aesthetic" in photography 187
10 Moneta Sleet, Jr. as active participant : the Selma March and the black arts movement 210
11 "If Bessie Smith had killed some white people" : racial legacies, the blues revival, and the black arts movement 227
12 A familiar strangeness : the spectre of whiteness in the Harlem renaissance and the black arts movement 255
13 The art of transformation : parallels in the black arts and feminist art movements 273
14 Prison writers and the black arts movement 297
15 "To make a poet black" : canonizing Puerto Rican poets in the black arts movement 317
16 Latin soul : cross-cultural connections between the black arts movement and Pocho-Che 333
17 Black arts to Def Jam : performing black "spirit work" across generations 349
Afterword : this bridge called "our tradition" : notes on blueblack, 'round' midnight, blacklight "connection" 369
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