A New World Order / Edition 1

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Overview

"One of the most important issues the world must deal with today is how sovereign countries can join together to make globalization work for everyone—not just the privileged. I believe that one way we can start to achieve this is by strengthening the Finance Ministers' G-20, and perhaps advancing a similar concept to the Leaders' level. In October 2003, I met with Anne-Marie Slaughter at a meeting organized by The Centre for International Governance Innovation in Waterloo, Ontario, where we discussed this concept in great detail. At the roundtable, Ms. Slaughter presented a number of original and innovative ways to bolster the G-20. I was impressed—her ideas were a fresh approach on how the world should govern itself. I believe that it will be her type of intellectual rigour and ingenuity that will bring to fruition new ways to manage our interdependence. Ms. Slaughter's work in global governance is highly regarded amongst international development thinkers and doers. This book, reflecting years of research and experience, is both interesting and timely. As you read, think deeply about the proposed ideas, and how we can use multilateralism to solve issues that single nations cannot solve alone. Greater human understanding is crucial in order to solve complex international problems. Ms. Slaughter has proven to have a clear grasp on how to improve the situation. I urge you to read on."—Paul Martin, Prime Minister of Canada

"A brilliant analysis of global networks emerging as if guided by an invisible hand. A 'must read' for anyone puzzling over issues of governance on a world scale, Anne-Marie Slaughter's book illustrates important trends that, whether you like them or not, will make you think hard and long."—George P. Shultz, former Secretary of State

"Anne-Marie Slaughter is a visionary, and A New World Order is her manifesto. Even those who have long studied international relations will see the world differently after reading this book."—Robert O. Keohane, James B. Duke Professor of Political Science, Duke University, author of After Hegemony: Cooperation and Discord in the World Political Economy

"Just when we thought America's postwar multilateralism had run out of steam, along comes this splendid book to offer a cornucopia of prescient forward-thinking about the new ties that bind us to the world."—Thomas M. Franck, New York University School of Law

"Global interdependence requires governance, but we properly fear global government. Anne-Marie Slaughter suggests an innovative solution to the dilemma. Her intelligent and highly readable book describes how global governance can occur through government networks that harness national government officials to address international problems. This book is a major contribution to an important debate."—Joseph S. Nye, Jr., author of The Paradox of American Power: Why the World's Only Superpower Can't Go It Alone

"In today's world one sees global networks everywhere, from capital markets to illegal drugs to terrorism. Now government is also going global, writes Anne-Marie Slaughter in this important and original work. Slaughter persuasively documents the rise of an organic international order based not on grand theories of world government but rather day-to-day contacts and communications among governments. She presents a vision of global governance that is practical and yet could have profound normative implications. Going well beyond the traditional confines of international law and international relations, this book will be discussed in both fields for years to come."—Fareed Zakaria, Editor, Newsweek International

"In this very ambitious, unique, and clearly written book, Anne-Marie Slaughter not only turns her focus to relatively uncharted territory but she does so with a very systematic and thoughtful analysis of not just what is going on, but why it is going on, and where it is likely to go in the future. No other book does this."—Sean D. Murphy, author of Humanitarian Intervention: The United Nations in an Evolving World Order

"This long-anticipated book represents the accumulation of more than a decade of insights by Anne-Marie Slaughter on the disaggregation of the state and the decentralization of diplomacy, the growing links across national boundaries of functionally specialized state officials, and new crossnational networks to fulfill the tasks of global governance."—Lori F. Damrosch, Columbia University, author of International Law Cases and Materials

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Editorial Reviews

New York Review of Books - Tony Judt
[An] important [book]. By showing how today's world—of what she calls 'disaggregated states'—actually works, Slaughter cuts the ground away from nationalists and internationalists alike. This, she says, is how it is, for America and everyone else. She also, quite clearly, believes that this how it should be . . . because nothing else will work. . . . I have absolutely no doubt that Slaughter is on to something.
Harvard Law Review - Kenneth Anderson
[A] groundbreaking book, a striking combination of both pragmatism and vision. . . . Slaughter represents the cutting intellectual edge of this decade's new way of thinking about global governance.
International Journal of Constitutional Law - Andras Sajo
The new world order of network governance will be a better place, especially if the reforms proposed by Slaughter are adopted and networks open up, enabling broader participation and increased accountability.
getAbstract - Financial Times
This excellent, thought-provoking analysis covers a widespread but little studied shift in the way the world works.
From the Publisher
Finalist for the 2004 Lionel Gelber Prize

One of Times Literary Supplement's International Books of the Year for 2004

Honorable Mention for the 2004 Award Award for Best Professional/Scholarly Book in Government and Political Science, Association of American Publishers

"[An] important [book]. By showing how today's world—of what she calls 'disaggregated states'—actually works, Slaughter cuts the ground away from nationalists and internationalists alike. This, she says, is how it is, for America and everyone else. She also, quite clearly, believes that this how it should be . . . because nothing else will work. . . . I have absolutely no doubt that Slaughter is on to something."—Tony Judt, New York Review of Books

"Breaking new ground in international relations theory, Slaughter . . . offers genuinely original thinking. . . . [A New World Order] generates much discussion about foreign policy."—
Publishers Weekly

"[A] major new statement about modern global governance. . . . Particularly revealing is Slaughter's remarkable account of the cooperation between national judicial authorities and international and regional courts."—
Foreign Affairs

"[A] groundbreaking book, a striking combination of both pragmatism and vision. . . . Slaughter represents the cutting intellectual edge of this decade's new way of thinking about global governance."—Kenneth Anderson, Harvard Law Review

"This excellent, thought-provoking analysis covers a widespread but little studied shift in the way the world works."—
Financial Times/getAbstract

"The new world order of network governance will be a better place, especially if the reforms proposed by Slaughter are adopted and networks open up, enabling broader participation and increased accountability."—Andras Sajo, International Journal of Constitutional Law

New York Review of Books
[An] important [book]. By showing how today's world—of what she calls 'disaggregated states'—actually works, Slaughter cuts the ground away from nationalists and internationalists alike. This, she says, is how it is, for America and everyone else. She also, quite clearly, believes that this how it should be . . . because nothing else will work. . . . I have absolutely no doubt that Slaughter is on to something.
— Tony Judt
Foreign Affairs
[A] major new statement about modern global governance. . . . Particularly revealing is Slaughter's remarkable account of the cooperation between national judicial authorities and international and regional courts.
Harvard Law Review
[A] groundbreaking book, a striking combination of both pragmatism and vision. . . . Slaughter represents the cutting intellectual edge of this decade's new way of thinking about global governance.
— Kenneth Anderson
Financial Times/getAbstract
This excellent, thought-provoking analysis covers a widespread but little studied shift in the way the world works.
International Journal of Constitutional Law
The new world order of network governance will be a better place, especially if the reforms proposed by Slaughter are adopted and networks open up, enabling broader participation and increased accountability.
— Andras Sajo
Publishers Weekly
Breaking new ground in international relations theory, Slaughter urges readers to lose their "conceptual blind spot" and see how the world really works. Scholars, pundits and policymakers, she writes, have traditionally seen nations as "unitary"-that is, as single entities that "articulate and pursue a single national interest." In fact, she says, we would do better to focus on government networks, both horizontal and vertical. Horizontal networks link counterpart national officials across borders, such as police investigators or financial regulators. Vertical networks are relationships between a nation's officials and some supranational organization to which they have ceded authority, such as the European Court of Justice. Networks, she says, are the solution to the "globalization paradox": The world needs global governance to combat problems that jump borders, like crime and environmental degradation, and yet most people fear-rightly, Slaughter implies-the idea of a centralized, all-powerful world government. The book both describes the here and now and plots a course for the future: Strengthening existing networks and developing new ones "could create a genuine global rule of law without centralized global institutions." The author, who is the dean of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton as well as president of the American Society of International Law, is steeped in these issues and offers genuinely original thinking. Written in dense academic language, this book will not pick up many casual readers, but it will likely attain instant textbook status and generate much discussion about foreign policy and whether, as Slaughter believes, the U.S. should welcome such networks in a globalized world. (Mar.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Foreign Affairs
In this major new statement about modern global governance, Slaughter, dean of Princeton's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, argues that governments are increasingly working together through transnational networks to respond to the challenges of interdependence. On issues ranging from organized crime and terrorism to human rights, the environment, finance, and trade, officials are exchanging information, coordinating policies, enforcing laws, and regulating markets through increasingly elaborate informal intergovernmental channels. In the traditional view, global governance results from states pursuing national interests. In Slaughter's view, however, global governance is manifest in the decentralized (and less visible) activity of judges, regulators, and legislators working with foreign counterparts and nongovernmental organizations on specific issues. Much of A New World Order is a mapping of these networks. Particularly revealing is Slaughter's remarkable account of the cooperation between national judicial authorities and international and regional courts, which is serving to globalize jurisprudence. The larger purpose of the book, however, is to suggest how such networks should be strengthened to improve governance. The challenge, as Slaughter sees it, is to make these networks accountable without ceding authority to potentially coercive centralized multinational organizations. She argues that transparency and norms of inclusiveness can help make them responsive to the public will.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691123974
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 7/18/2005
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 368
  • Sales rank: 1,345,158
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.12 (h) x 0.89 (d)

Meet the Author

Anne-Marie Slaughter is Dean of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and the Bert G. Kerstetter '66 University Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and serves on the board of the Council on Foreign Relations.
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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments xi
List of Abbreviations xv
Introduction 1
1. The Globalization Paradox: Needing More Government and Fearing It 8
2. The Disaggregated State 12
3. A New World Order 15
4. A Just New World Order 27
5. Conclusion: Pushing the Paradigm 31
CHAPTER 1
Regulators: The New Diplomats 36
1. A New Phenomenon? 41
2. Where Are They? 45
3. What Do They Do? 51
4. Conclusion 61
CHAPTER 2
Judges: Constructing a Global Legal System 65
1. Constitutional Cross-Fertilization 69
2. Toward a Global Community of Human Rights Law 79
3. The Role of National Courts in the Construction of the European Community Legal System 82
4. Judicial Cooperation and Conflict in Transnational Litigation 85
5. Meeting Face to Face 96
6. Conclusion 100
CHAPTER 3
Legislators: Lagging Behind 104
1. Legislators Finding Their Voice on the World Stage 107
2. Legislative Networks as Catalysts and Correctives for Regional Integration 119
3. Helping Legislators "Do Their Work Better" 125
4. Conclusion 127
CHAPTER 4
A Disaggregated World Order 131
1. The Horizontal Dimension: Networks of Networks 135
2. The Vertical Dimension 144
3. Government Networks and Traditional International Organizations: Interconnected Worlds 152
4. Conclusion 162
CHAPTER 5
An Effective World Order 166
1. What Government Networks Do Now 171
2. What Government Networks Could Do 195
3. Conclusion 213
CHAPTER 6
A Just World Order 216
1. Problems with Government Networks 217
2. A Menu of Potential Solutions 230
3. Global Norms Regulating Government Networks 244
4. Conclusion 257
Conclusion 261
1. Government Networks and Global Public Policy 262
2. National Support for Government Networks 264
3. Disaggregated Sovereignty 266
Notes 273
Bibliography 319
Index 333

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2013

    Your global governance will be destroyed

    NWO will fail.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2005

    Exceptional Read

    This book is a must-read for any student of International Affairs. By providing historical and present-day examples of international and transnational relations among states, Dean Slaughter brilliantly lays the framework and provides justification for a new disaggregated, effective, and just world order. Both synoptic in organization and substantive throughout, this book will prove valuable to all readers regardless of political affiliation or school of thought.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2004

    Highly Recommended!

    This excellent, thought-provoking analysis covers a widespread but little studied shift in the way the world works. The advance of international communications, technology, economics and finance networks has had an unmistakable effect on business and industry. The ways states function has also changed ¿ shifting the operation of the world order. Author Anne-Marie Slaughter, dean of Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, is on expert ground. She asserts that networks of financiers, regulators, judges and even legislators can solve problems that would be intractable if left only to traditional states and familiar international organizations. She provides many examples of such networks, notes the criticism against them and suggests norms to govern their conduct. Her book is not light reading. Readers need some familiarity with international organizations and institutions (sometimes cited by unexplained acronyms), but we highly recommend this book to sophisticated observers of international policy.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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