New Worlds for All: Indians, Europeans, and the Remaking of Early America / Edition 1

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Overview

Although many Americans consider the establishment of the colonies as the birth of this country, in fact Early America already existed long before the arrival of the Europeans. From coast to coast, Native Americans had created enduring cultures, and the subsequent European invasion remade much of the existing land and culture. In New Worlds for All, Colin Calloway explores the unique and vibrant new cultures that Indians and Europeans forged together in early America. The journey toward this hybrid society kept Europeans' and Indians' lives tightly entwined: living, working, worshiping, traveling, and trading together—as well as fearing, avoiding, despising, and killing one another. In the West, settlers lived in Indian towns, eating Indian food. In Mohawk Valley, New York, Europeans tattooed their faces; Indians drank tea. And, a unique American identity emerged.

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Editorial Reviews

Christian Science Monitor
Calloway employs lucid prose and captivating examples to remind us that neither Indians nor Colonists were a monolithic group... The result is a more nuanced appreciation for the complexity of cultural relationships in Colonial America... He surveys this complex story with imagination and insight and provides an essential starting point for all those interested in the interaction of Europeans and Indians in early American life.

— David R. Shi

Journal of American Ethnic History - James Drake
New Worlds for All fills an important niche in the historiography of early America. The book presents the best available brief synthesis of current historical scholarship on relations between Indians and Europeans, and it covers all of North America instead of just the British colonies.
Christian Science Monitor

Calloway employs lucid prose and captivating examples to remind us that neither Indians nor Colonists were a monolithic group... The result is a more nuanced appreciation for the complexity of cultural relationships in Colonial America... He surveys this complex story with imagination and insight and provides an essential starting point for all those interested in the interaction of Europeans and Indians in early American life.

— David R. Shi

Kirkus Reviews
A highly readable if not highly original history of the early interaction between Europeans and Native Americans.

Recent history generally casts the European conquest of North America as a thoughtless or malicious genocide of the indigenous population. And while this is in some ways correct, the stress on American Indians' victimization at the hands of the invaders results in ignoring the Indians' contribution to the resulting American culture. While Calloway (History and Native American Studies/Dartmouth Coll.; The American Revolution in Indian Country, 1995, not reviewed) acknowledges that the European effect on Indian life was larger, and more devastating, than the other way around, he contends that Indian culture contributed in many significant ways to what would eventually become a distinctly American way of life. The author supports his thesis with many oft-cited facts about early colonial times. Few readers will be surprised when Calloway reports that Europeans settled in deserted Indian towns, looked to Indians to show them how to cultivate indigenous crops, or that not just corn and tobacco but also potatoes and tomatoes were discovered in the New World and introduced to Europeans as exports from the colonies. Not as well known is the respect many Europeans felt for Indian medicine, or that so-called "Indian-style" warfare—guerrilla tactics that the colonists were said to have adopted in their successful fight against the British army during the American Revolution—was in fact only invented by Indians a hundred years before to counter the unfamiliar tactics of European interlopers.

Although much of the information here is well known, this is a fine primer on the cross-cultural influence of the Europeans and Indians in early American life.

Christian Science Monitor - David R. Shi

Calloway employs lucid prose and captivating examples to remind us that neither Indians nor Colonists were a monolithic group... The result is a more nuanced appreciation for the complexity of cultural relationships in Colonial America... He surveys this complex story with imagination and insight and provides an essential starting point for all those interested in the interaction of Europeans and Indians in early American life.

Wisconsin Magazine of History - Charles L. Cohen

New Worlds for All fills an important niche in the historiography of early America. The book presents the best available brief synthesis of current historical scholarship on relations between Indians and Europeans, and it covers all of North America instead of just the British colonies.

Journal of American History - Karen Ordahl Kupperman

Paints a panoramic picture of multilayered interactions between Europeans and American Natives throughout North America... Through a telling use of quotation and example Calloway demonstrates that history comprises the cumulative experience of countless people.

American Historical Review - Richard White

Calloway wants to restore Indian peoples to a national experience from which they have, except as combatants against whites, been largely erased. But more than that, he wants to show how European settlers, as they entered Indian country, became Americans.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780801859595
  • Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
  • Publication date: 2/28/1998
  • Series: The American Moment Series
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 1,232,600
  • Product dimensions: 6.01 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.57 (d)

Meet the Author

Colin G. Calloway is professor of history and Native American studies at Dartmouth College. His previous books include The American Revolution in Indian Country: Crisis and Diversity in Native American Communities, nominated for a 1995 Pulitzer Prize; The Western Abenakis of Vermont, 1600-1800: War, Migration, and the Survival of an Indian People; and Crown and Calumet: British-Indian Relations, 1783-1815.

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Table of Contents

Maps
Preface and Acknowledgments
Timeline
Introduction: The Kaleidoscope of Early America 1
1 Imagining and Creating a New World 8
2 Healing and Disease 24
3 The Stuff of Life 42
4 A World of Dreams and Bibles 68
5 New World Warfare and a New World of War 92
6 New World Diplomacy and New World Foreign Policies 115
7 New Nomads and True Nomads 134
8 Crossing and Merging Frontiers 152
9 New Peoples and New Societies 178
Conclusion: New Americans and First Americans 195
Bibliographical Essay 199
Index 219
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 25, 2004

    Thematic Survey of early Native American History

    This book is a fascinating survey of Native American history during the colonial period and into the early nineteenth century. It examines a range of issues such as the influence of disease, religion and trade on Native American societies. Calloway reveals the many different ways in which Native American societies responded to European contact and provides some wonderful examples of interaction, from the early fascination of some native peoples with the written work to Native American treatment of captives. If you are looking for a 'history' of early Native American relations this is possibly NOT your book. Calloways takes a thematic rather than a chronological approach to his topic. However, that is what makes this such an interesting work. Instead of the sometimes rather dreary and depressing narrative of battles and broken treaties, this work looks at how contact with Europeans transformed the day-to-day lives of Native Americans. The picture it paints of Native American life and culture is vivid. It is possibly my favourite work on this topic, but if you know little Native American history you might be better starting off with a more chronological survey in addition to this work.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 1, 2004

    An excellent learning tool

    In New Worlds for All, Colin Calloway establishes as his thesis his desire to ¿explore the new worlds that Indians and Europeans created together in early America.¿ He identifies this goal in the first paragraph of the book, and reiterates by clarifying that the reader will find not a historical textbook chronicling the lives of ghetto-dwelling American Indians, but rather a series of impressions portraying how American Indians were ¿essential participants [with Europeans] in the making of American history and the shaping of American societies.¿ Many authors of history, especially ethnohistorians, have a difficult choice in the presentation structure of their work. Calloway chooses to present his material in subject based essays rather than in a chronologically progressive narrative. This allows him to probe nine separate topics over three centuries in essays so thorough that each could stand alone for its academic merit. In one early essay, Calloway provides great praise for the nearly unparalleled powers of Indians to heal the sick, then in contrast he enumerates the havoc that European-borne diseases wreaked on whole Indian populations. In another, he juxtaposes the tremendous benefits of the unabated influx of material goods and foodstuffs, against the resultant destruction of the demographic and economic equilibriums. Later, Callaway turns to the great migrations which occurred: Europeans migrating because Indians provided them maps and taught them how to navigate the land; and Indians migrating because Europeans used those maps as instruments of conquest, forcing whole territories of Indians into refugee camps. Along the way, Calloway also addresses the subjects of religion and international and intertribal politics and war, providing equally astounding synopses. Calloway is careful to not present a wholly one-sided portrait. Indians, he shows, willingly depleted the indigenous supplies of beaver and sea otters in trade for European alcohol and guns. The book gives examples of Indians who falsely professed religious conversion for the purpose of being permitted to engage in such trade, or to advance their tribe¿s political goals. Calloway also subtly but repeatedly interjects justification for the European behavior: centuries of wars, plagues, and famines forced Europeans to see America as virgin land designed to give humanity a second chance; European tension resulting from religious and dynastic conflict was so extreme that, arriving in America, European immigrants naturally applied their savagery and pillaging to those who stood as rivals to their objectives. By use of copious examples, Calloway provides an impressive inventory of facts and statistics. His research seems comprehensive, and readers gain a deep understanding of the impact of the interaction of the European immigrants and the American Indians. This imposing collection of data, however, cannot help but undermine his thesis. His story is not about new worlds created together, it is a story of conquest and annihilation. Calloway's own numbers attest it plainly. In the three centuries of the survey, the Indian population decreased by 96%, from an estimated 15 million to 600,000. In the same timeframe, the immigrant population increased from a negligible number to over 6 million. Calloway's own words describe it vividly: armed with guidance gained from Indians, Europeans dispossessed Indians and rendered them invisible. As much as Calloway desires to show a cultural kaleidoscope, the very facts he so abundantly provides speak louder than his rhetoric. Because of his use of bibliographical essays rather than more direct foot- or end-noting, Calloway leaves the reader to trust the facts he presents based on his comprehensive style and his credentials. Also, because he presents in the subject based format rather than in a progressive one, the reader must patchwork together a complete picture of the European immigrant or Amer

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