New Worlds for All: Indians, Europeans, and the Remaking of Early America

New Worlds for All: Indians, Europeans, and the Remaking of Early America

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by Colin G. Calloway
     
 

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Although many Americans consider the establishment of the colonies as the birth of this country, in fact early America existed long before the arrival of the Europeans. From coast to coast, Native Americans had created enduring cultures, and the subsequent European invasion remade much of the land and society. In New Worlds for All, Colin G. Calloway

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Overview

Although many Americans consider the establishment of the colonies as the birth of this country, in fact early America existed long before the arrival of the Europeans. From coast to coast, Native Americans had created enduring cultures, and the subsequent European invasion remade much of the land and society. In New Worlds for All, Colin G. Calloway explores the unique and vibrant new cultures that Indians and Europeans forged together in early America. The journey toward this hybrid society kept Europeans' and Indians' lives tightly entwined: living, working, worshiping, traveling, and trading together—as well as fearing, avoiding, despising, and killing one another. In some areas, settlers lived in Indian towns, eating Indian food. In the Mohawk Valley of New York, Europeans tattooed their faces; Indians drank tea. A unique American identity emerged.

The second edition of New Worlds for All incorporates fifteen years of additional scholarship on Indian-European relations, such as the role of gender, Indian slavery, relationships with African Americans, and new understandings of frontier society.

Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
A highly readable if not highly original history of the early interaction between Europeans and Native Americans.

Recent history generally casts the European conquest of North America as a thoughtless or malicious genocide of the indigenous population. And while this is in some ways correct, the stress on American Indians' victimization at the hands of the invaders results in ignoring the Indians' contribution to the resulting American culture. While Calloway (History and Native American Studies/Dartmouth Coll.; The American Revolution in Indian Country, 1995, not reviewed) acknowledges that the European effect on Indian life was larger, and more devastating, than the other way around, he contends that Indian culture contributed in many significant ways to what would eventually become a distinctly American way of life. The author supports his thesis with many oft-cited facts about early colonial times. Few readers will be surprised when Calloway reports that Europeans settled in deserted Indian towns, looked to Indians to show them how to cultivate indigenous crops, or that not just corn and tobacco but also potatoes and tomatoes were discovered in the New World and introduced to Europeans as exports from the colonies. Not as well known is the respect many Europeans felt for Indian medicine, or that so-called "Indian-style" warfare—guerrilla tactics that the colonists were said to have adopted in their successful fight against the British army during the American Revolution—was in fact only invented by Indians a hundred years before to counter the unfamiliar tactics of European interlopers.

Although much of the information here is well known, this is a fine primer on the cross-cultural influence of the Europeans and Indians in early American life.

Christian Science Monitor
Calloway employs lucid prose and captivating examples to remind us that neither Indians nor Colonists were a monolithic group... The result is a more nuanced appreciation for the complexity of cultural relationships in Colonial America... He surveys this complex story with imagination and insight and provides an essential starting point for all those interested in the interaction of Europeans and Indians in early American life.

— David R. Shi

Christian Science Monitor - David R. Shi

Calloway employs lucid prose and captivating examples to remind us that neither Indians nor Colonists were a monolithic group... The result is a more nuanced appreciation for the complexity of cultural relationships in Colonial America... He surveys this complex story with imagination and insight and provides an essential starting point for all those interested in the interaction of Europeans and Indians in early American life.

Journal of American History - Karen Ordahl Kupperman

Paints a panoramic picture of multilayered interactions between Europeans and American Natives throughout North America... Through a telling use of quotation and example Calloway demonstrates that history comprises the cumulative experience of countless people.

American Historical Review - Richard White

Calloway wants to restore Indian peoples to a national experience from which they have, except as combatants against whites, been largely erased. But more than that, he wants to show how European settlers, as they entered Indian country, became Americans.

Journal of American Ethnic History - James Drake
New Worlds for All fills an important niche in the historiography of early America. The book presents the best available brief synthesis of current historical scholarship on relations between Indians and Europeans, and it covers all of North America instead of just the British colonies.

Wisconsin Magazine of History - Charles L. Cohen

New Worlds for All fills an important niche in the historiography of early America. The book presents the best available brief synthesis of current historical scholarship on relations between Indians and Europeans, and it covers all of North America instead of just the British colonies.

From the Publisher

"An essential starting point for all those interested in the interaction of Europeans and Indians in early American life."— Christian Science Monitor

The American Indian Quarterly

New Worlds for All is a clear and concise survey that is valuable for students as well as researchers, especially those whose focus is outside of early America and Native American history.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781421411217
Publisher:
Johns Hopkins University Press
Publication date:
09/25/2013
Series:
American Moment
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
264
File size:
6 MB
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are saying about this

James H. Merrell
Colin Calloway's grand synthesis of the experience of Indians and other Americans before 1800 is exceptional in its breadth of vision. Taking as his canvas the entire North American continent—examining everything from war and disease to trade and sex, from clothes and houses to foods and cures—he nonetheless never loses sight of the individual, human story, the vivid encounter or striking incident that brings the past to life.

Gregory E. Dowd
I cannot think of another work that sets out to accomplish what Colin Calloway has achieved. New Worlds for All stands poised to become the most successful synthesis of North American ethnohistory from contact to the early national period.

Daniel K. Richter
Colin Calloway charts a sensible middle way between the gross generalizations and the random trivia that have long dominated discussions of the influences that Native Americans and Europeans exerted on one another. Wearing its vast research lightly, New Worlds for All provides an excellent introduction to recent scholarship on cultural interaction in early America.

Peter C. Mancall
The European colonization of North America entailed not the discovery of a 'New World' but the creation of multiple 'new worlds.' Colin Calloway is to be congratulated for synthesizing an enormous body of scholarship and offering this accessible explanation of the emergence of a multicultural America.

Meet the Author

Colin G. Calloway is the John Kimball Jr. 1943 Professor of History and Professor of Native American Studies at Dartmouth College. His many other books include The American Revolution in Indian Country; One Vast Winter Count: The Native American West before Lewis and Clark, which won six best book awards; The Scratch of a Pen: 1763 and the Transformation of North America, which won the Distinguished Book Award from the Society of Colonial Wars in the State of New York; and Pen and Ink Witchcraft: Treaties and Treaty Making in American Indian History.

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New Worlds for All: Indians, Europeans, and the Remaking of Early America 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
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