New York, 1609-1776 by Michael Burgan, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
New York, 1609-1776

New York, 1609-1776

by Michael Burgan
     
 

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Believe it or not, New York's past was as wild, exciting, and contentious as its present. It's hard to imagine now that New York City was once a wilderness, but Manhattan takes its name from an Algonquian Indian word meaning "hilly island." Henry Hudson's haul of fine furs convinced the Dutch to establish their colony at the gateway to the New World, and the island

Overview

Believe it or not, New York's past was as wild, exciting, and contentious as its present. It's hard to imagine now that New York City was once a wilderness, but Manhattan takes its name from an Algonquian Indian word meaning "hilly island." Henry Hudson's haul of fine furs convinced the Dutch to establish their colony at the gateway to the New World, and the island was bought from the Native Americans.

Once settled, New York soon became the crucible of commerce in America, and the steely spirit of New Yorkers was forged fast. The narrative of New York has been marked ever since with the spirit of its inhabitants' fierce independence and individuality.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Colonial New York was originally an enclave of settlers who crossed the Atlantic from the Netherlands to establish new lives in an unknown portion of the world. The early Dutch settlers carved out farms and towns in areas that had for generations been the ancestral territories of Native Americans. Over time the Dutch superseded the claims of native peoples to land, mineral rights, and the ability to call segments of New York their own. Then competing settlers and military forces from England uprooted the Dutch and transformed what had once been referred to as New Amsterdam into New York. Eventually, the Anglo-Saxon settlers established a colony that was to become one of the most prosperous of the crown's thirteen fiefdoms in the New World. By 1776 residents of New York were sharply divided over the cause of rebellion. Many New Yorkers held true to King George III while others supported the rebellion. It is this evolving story of early settlement leading to overt revolution that is presented by veteran historian Michael Burgan in this volume of the illustrated "Voices From Colonial America" series. As in many other books written by Michael Burgan, this particular title combines fluid writing, careful research, and an eye for telling an interesting story. Readers of this work will gain a greater and keener understanding of what life might have been like in the early days of New York. 2006, National Geographic, and Ages 12 up.
—Greg M. Romaneck
VOYA - Angela Semifero
This eighteen-volume set discusses the history of each of the thirteen original colonies, from European exploration to the Declaration of Independence. Other volumes include Texas, California, Florida, Louisiana, and New France. New York: 1609-1776 primarily tells the story of New York as a center of trade. There is special emphasis placed on how its Dutch roots influenced development, on conflicts between English and Dutch armies, and on the colonists' interactions with the Iroquois tribes. Georgia: 1521-1776 describes the humble beginnings of a debtors' colony that evolved into a wealthy plantation state and became a significant battleground in the Revolutionary War. Stories of historical figures such as John Jay and Benedict Arnold are integrated into both texts as points of interest. These two texts, although more readable and pleasant than a textbook, do not present information in a way that meets any foreseeable audience interest. Scattered definitions and segments of primary documents do not add much to the narrative. The two texts contain time lines and great additional resources, including a very useful listing of Web sites. The books are not structured to serve as reference materials, nor is the narrative compelling enough to be read for entertainment. The authors do an exemplary job of summarizing the political and military aspects of the colonies, but other significant social issues are neglected. Attempts are made in the text to discuss slavery and interactions with Native Americans, but only the dominant political voices from colonial America are heard here. There are other resources that could be more useful for students learning about this period ofAmerican history, such as the Colonial America Reference Library.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780792263906
Publisher:
National Geographic Society
Publication date:
04/11/2006
Series:
NG Voices from Colonial America Series
Pages:
112
Sales rank:
1,159,936
Product dimensions:
7.76(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.46(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Michael Burgan lives in Chicago, IL.

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