New York Cookbook: From Pelham Bay to Park Avenue, Firehouses to Four-Star Restaurants

Overview

NIBBLES AND NOSHES

Falafel, fritters, and the Four Seasons' Salmon Rillettes. Grandma Dora's Chopped Liver and Lupe's savory Empanadillas. Steamed pork dumplings, a caviar primer, smart cocktails by the borough. SOUP AND BREAD Mai Loan Bass' Vietnamese Sweet and Sour Soup and Spring Street Prosciutto Bread. Lord & Taylor's Scotch Broth and West Indian Coco Bread. Plus Eli's Orwasher's, and the return of the neighborhood bakery. MAIN STREET MEATS The "21" Club Burger. The New...

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Overview

NIBBLES AND NOSHES

Falafel, fritters, and the Four Seasons' Salmon Rillettes. Grandma Dora's Chopped Liver and Lupe's savory Empanadillas. Steamed pork dumplings, a caviar primer, smart cocktails by the borough. SOUP AND BREAD Mai Loan Bass' Vietnamese Sweet and Sour Soup and Spring Street Prosciutto Bread. Lord & Taylor's Scotch Broth and West Indian Coco Bread. Plus Eli's Orwasher's, and the return of the neighborhood bakery. MAIN STREET MEATS The "21" Club Burger. The New Your steak. June Bobb's Garlic Pork, and Leg of Lamb with Oregano Potatoes. And oh, the brisket! CHICKEN TOWN Andre Soltner roasts it, Laurie Colwin bakes it, Mrs. Pearl Colwin cacciatories it, Yvonne "Lola" Bell fries it, Mrs. Hathansel paprikashes it, Allan Vernon jerks it, Kaneeze Fatima tandooris it, and Carmen Luisa Reyes turns hers into soulful Arroz con Pollo. SEAFOOD Grand Central Oyster Bar's classic Oyster Pan Roast. The genius of Gilbert Le Coze and his Shellfish Stew. Anne Rosenweig's signature Lobster Club Sandwich and Ed Bradley's spicy Shrimp Creole (takes less than 60 minutes). VEGETABLE SOPHISTICATION Edna Lewis' Greens and Marvelous Marrakesh Carrots. Abyssinian Baptist Church's Slow Cooked Green Beans and Union Square Caf,'s Mashed Turnips with Crispy Shallots. THE WAYS TO LOVE PASTA From lasagne to pastisio, pierogi to wonton, pad Thai to cold sesame noodles. With Puttanesca a la Andy's Colonial Tavern, Turkey Day Spaghetti Carbonara, and Horn & Hardart's Baked Macaroni and Cheese. 63 SPECTACULAR ENDINGS Sally Deitz's Outrageous Chocolate Cake. Junior's Cheesecake, Lindy's Cheesecake. That famous Carrot Top Cake. Le Cirque's CrSme Brulee and Greek Diner Banana Cream Pie, the pie that reaches the sky. PLUS hundreds of photographs, walking tours, shopping tips, cooking hints, feature stories, anecdotes, and where-to-find-its throughout. CITYMEALS-ON-WHEELS In the true spirit of a community cookbook, a portion of the royalties earned by this book are donated to CityMeals-on-Wheels.

MOLLY O'NEILL The Damon Runyon of the New York food world, Molly O'Neill is food columnist for The New York Times Magazine. She spend five years on THE NEW YORK COOKBOOK.

New York is America's kitchen: a mecca for food from around the country and the world. Collected from all five boroughs by New York Times food writer Molly O'Neill, here are over 400 recipes and 500 photos that celebrate one thing--a passion for food and eating. Partial royalties earned go to the Citymeals-on-Wheels charity. Winner of a 1992 IACP/Julia Child Cookbook Award.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780894806988
  • Publisher: Workman Publishing Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 1/10/1992
  • Pages: 512
  • Sales rank: 500,233
  • Product dimensions: 7.34 (w) x 9.18 (h) x 1.25 (d)

Meet the Author

The Damon Runyon of the New York food world, Molly O'Neill is food columnist for The New York Times Magazine. She spent five years on The New York Cookbook.

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Read an Excerpt

Confessional Chili

David Durk, whose career in law enforcement has spanned 23 years and included a stint as the partner of the famous Frank Serpico, purports to have served this atomic chili to tight-lipped prisoners and potential informers, many of whom he claims "would never talk to a New York Cop." How soon after consumption did they start gabbing? "Immediately," he laughs.

2 to 3 large onions, chopped

4 large garlic cloves, minced

3 to 4 small Indian green chiles, chopped, or 4 jalapeno chiles, chopped (including the seeds), or 3 tablespoons extra-hot ground dried chiles

3 tablespoons peanut oil

3 pounds lean chopped sirloin

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

1 tablespoon ground coriander

3 tablespoons ground cumin

1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves

1 teaspoon dried Greek oregano

2 cans (28 ounces each) imported Italian whole plum tomatoes

4 bay leaves

2 cans (16 ounces each) pinto beans, rinsed and drained

1 bunch cilantro or Italian (flat-leaf) parsley, rinsed and chopped.

1. In a large heavy pot or Dutch oven over medium heat, sautS the onions, garlic, and chiles in the oil until the onions are translucent, 5 minutes.

2. Crumble the chopped sirloin over the top of the vegetables. Season with salt and pepper; stir in the coriander, cumin, thyme, and oregano. Cover and cook until the meat is cooked through, about 7 minutes.

3. Pour the tomatoes into a small bowl and coarsely crush with your hands. Pour the tomatoes and juice on top of the chili mixture. Stir in the bay leaves. Cover or leave uncovered, depending on the consistency you prefer (a covered pot with yield a thicker chile), and simmer until the flavors are well married, about 30 minutes.

4. Stir in the pinto beans and simmer, covered, for 15 minutes. Stir in the cilantro and simmer for another 5 minutes. Serve at once.

Serves 8 to 10

Subhir's Aloo Parantha

Subhir Seth learned to make this bread in the Khyber Pass on the border of West Afghanistan and North Pakistan. He recommends serving it as a first course with cumin-flavored yogurt for dipping.

BREAD

3 ½ cups whole wheat flour

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

½ teaspoon salt

STUFFING

1 pound potatoes

1/3 cup minced fresh cilantro

teaspoon gound cumin

1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger

teaspoon salt

COOKING

About 1 cup vegetable oil

1. To make the bread: Combine the flour, vegetable oil, salt, and 1 ½ cups water in a large bowl. Knead to make a smooth dough, about 5 minutes. Divide the dough into 10 equal balls. Place the dough on a tray and set aside to rest in a cool place while you make the stuffing.

2. To make the stuffing: Boil the potatoes in salted water until soft, 30 minutes. Drain and allow to cool slightly.

3. Peel the potatoes, then rice or mash them by hand in a bowl. Stir in the cilantro, chile, cumin, ginger, and salt. Divide the mixture into 10 equal balls.

4. Use your finger to make a deep indentation in each of the dough balls. Place some of the stuffing in each and seal the dough over the stuffing. On a lightly floured board, use a rolling pin to gently flatten each stuffed dough into an 8-inch disk.

5. To cook: Place a griddle or cast-iron skillet over medium heat and coat with 1 tablespoon of the oil. When the oil is hot, place 1 bread in the pan and fry for 1 minute on each side. Sprinkle the bread with additional oil and fry for another minute on each side. Continue frying the breads one at a time, with additional oil. Srve immediately.

Makes 10 paranthas

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Table of Contents

LOOKING FOR THE HEART OF THE CITY

NIBBLES, NOSHES, AND APPETIZING

Meal Starters, coffee breaks, street food-New York's best little bites. Falafel, Jamaican beef patties, hummus, clam fritters, savory chicken wings, and Jarlsberg squares.

Noshing with Lou Singer

Nosh Stops

A Taste of the Tropics

On Being a Hostess with the Leastest

Lox, Stock, and Bagels

To Catch a Proper Nova

Smart Cocktails by the Borough and Beyond

Many-Faced Quiche

Stone Fence

The Caviarteria and What It Knows

New York's Artisan Springs

SOUPS FOR SIPPING, SLURPING, SUPPER

New York bowlfuls. Chicken soup in all its ethnic varieties. Scotch broth, hot and sour soup, and Hungarian szekely. Borscht, bisque, green minestrone, white bean soup, and snert.

Chicken Soup: A New York Panacea

Matzoh Bowl I

The Soup Man of 55th Street

Manhattan Clam Chowder

TO BAKE AN HONEST LOAF

Breads with crust and breads with heft. Fresh muffins, bagels, babka, beer bread, roti, parantha, and focaccia.

The Brick Oven Brotherhood

Where to Buy a Good Loaf

Stalking the Perfect Pizza Pie

Pizza Stops

To Make a Soft Prezel

A Bagel Is a Bagel . . .

FOOD WALKS

Food on foot. Tours of New York's ethnic neighborhoods and food markets. Where to stop and why.

THE GREENING OF NEW YORK

New York cooks offer up Southern-style and Chinese-style greens, Caribbean callaloo, Marrakesh carrots, and artichokes with a Turkish twist. Plus baked beans, potato chips, and potato latkes. And salads. And pickles.

The Greening of New York

New York's Greenmarkets

Produce Paradise

Mrs. Beausojour's Short Guide to Caribbean Vegetables

Lexicon of Asian Vegetables

Mickeys and Chips

For Those Who Don't Know David "The Latke King," There Is Some Hope.

Vegetable Wisdom

Brighton Beach Memories

The Caesar Salad Song and Caesar Salad Translation

New York in a Pickle

Wildman Looks for Dinner

The Smart Cook

Using Infused and Syrup-Flavored Oils

A CHRONOLOGY OF SIGNIFICANT CULINARY EVENTS IN NEW YORK CITY

New York has always been a happening food town. From the first coffee-houses in the 1600s to soda fountains in the 1800s to hot dogs, cafeterias, Chiclets, Tootsie Rolls, and cheesecake, New Yorkers have made their mark.

NEW YORK NOODLES

Spaghetti, linguine, penne, orzo-pastas dried and fresh with their sauces. Plus pierogis, wontons, polenta, grits, tabbouleh, and risotto.

Pasta Plus Dumplings, Noodles, and Grains

The Red Sea

Mrs. Romana Raffetto of Houston Street

Just a Few New York Noodles

Bumper Crops in Bensonhurst

Arthur Avenue Nights

Salvatore ("Mr. Wab") Medici of East Harlem

National Spaghetti Carbonara Day

Fresh Noodles

Dueling Dumplings

THE MEAT OF THE MATTER

Great Steaks, brisket, casseroles, cutlets, stews, and chops. Unbelievable barbecue, meatloaf every way, and a hamburger like no other. Plus shish kebab, leg of lamb, couscous, and South African

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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2004

    the best gift

    this book has become my favorite gift to give to friends living in New York or elsewhere...I am a native New Yorker and I love giving this book to friends who have moved from New York or who have visited me here...moreover, I read and re-read this book regularly...it is filled with interesting facts and history about New York City. it is by far one of my favorite books

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2004

    great variety

    I love this cookbook. It is my favorite out of some 60 cookbooks that I own. My mother would not give it back to me, so I have to buy another.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2003

    Very Authentic Recipes...

    I've had this book for 10 years now. It's still one of my favorites. The historical accounts & the sought after recipes are very authentic. My grandmother came here in the early 1900's from Russia & made the best noodle pudding (kugel). I never did get the recipe from her. To my wonderful surprise, the kugel recipe in this book tastes exactly as though it were from my grandmother's oven. It's a must for any New Yorker or NY admirer!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2001

    Best of Old Time New York Favorites

    We really enjoyed duplicating the recipes of our favorite New York restaurants especially, Horn & Hardart's Macaroni and Cheese - which brings back memories of the Automat on 42nd Street. Great book to add to your collection!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2000

    One of my favorites!

    This book contains fantastic recipes, plus the stories and history of NY traditional foods. It really teaches about the culture of NY's eataries and people. This cookbook is really meant for someone who not only appreciates good recipes, but also loves hearing about the history of the places and people! Where else can you find recipes from Le Cirque, Club 21 and Katherine Hepburn all in one book?!?

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