New York Subways: An Illustrated History of New York City's Transit Cars

Overview

The first subway line in New York City opened on October 27, 1904. To celebrate the centennial of this event, the Johns Hopkins University Press presents a new edition of Gene Sansone's acclaimed book, Evolution of New York City Subways. Produced under the auspices of New York's Metropolitan Transit Authority, this comprehensive account of the rapid transit system's design and engineering history offers an extensive array of photographs, engineering plans, and technical data for nearly every subway car in the New...

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Overview

The first subway line in New York City opened on October 27, 1904. To celebrate the centennial of this event, the Johns Hopkins University Press presents a new edition of Gene Sansone's acclaimed book, Evolution of New York City Subways. Produced under the auspices of New York's Metropolitan Transit Authority, this comprehensive account of the rapid transit system's design and engineering history offers an extensive array of photographs, engineering plans, and technical data for nearly every subway car in the New York City system from the days of steam and cable to the present.

The product of years of meticulous research in various city archives, this book is organized by type of car, from the 1903–04 wood and steel Composite cars to the R142 cars put into service in 2000. For each car type, Sansone provides a brief narrative history of its design, construction, and service record, followed by detailed schematic drawings and accompanying tables that provide complete technical data, from the average cost per car and passenger capacity to seat and structure material, axle load, and car weight. Sansone also includes a helpful subway glossary from A Car (the end car in a multiple car coupled unit) to Zone (a section of the train to the conductor's left or right side).

Subway and train enthusiasts, students of New York City history, and specialists in the history of technology will appreciate this updated and authoritative reference work about one of the twentieth century's greatest urban achievements.

Johns Hopkins University Press

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Editorial Reviews

New Yorker
From Reviews of our Previous Edition: The humble New York subway car has its fans, as Gene Sansone demonstrates in his exhaustive survey. Featuring such curios as a private subway car built in 1904 for the director of the subway, his work also provides useful insights into such imponderables as why the cars on the F line are longer than those on, say, the 1 and 9 lines.

— Leo Carey

Railroad History
Offers the reader a comprehensive, accurate, well-illustrated, highly documented catalog of the nearly 5,800 current New York City subway cars, along with the many thousands of long-gone cars. Every subway student or enthusiast will return to it often to browse the pages or to research a specific car series. It is an indispensable companion to prior or future general histories of one of the world's greatest people movers.

— Richard L. Allman

Book News

Subway train enthusiasts, students of New York City history, and specialists in the history of technology will appreciate this reference on the city's subway system.

Choice

Sansone comprehensively examines more than 5,000 New York City subway cars... The book can be enjoyed by readers interested in transit car history while subway enthusiasts will appreciate the ease with which specific cars can be researched.

Industrial Archaeology
Well organized and provides an abundance of data in both written and pictorial form.

— Efstathios I. Pappas

NJ News

The product of years of meticulous research... Subway and train enthusiasts, students of New York City history, and specialists in the history of technology will appreciate this updated and authoritative reference work.

Railfan & Railroad
Sansone clearly knows his subject inside and out, and presents it in a fascinating, entertaining manner.

— Nate MacMaster

New Yorker - Leo Carey

From Reviews of our Previous Edition: The humble New York subway car has its fans, as Gene Sansone demonstrates in his exhaustive survey. Featuring such curios as a private subway car built in 1904 for the director of the subway, his work also provides useful insights into such imponderables as why the cars on the F line are longer than those on, say, the 1 and 9 lines.

Railroad History - Richard L. Allman

Offers the reader a comprehensive, accurate, well-illustrated, highly documented catalog of the nearly 5,800 current New York City subway cars, along with the many thousands of long-gone cars. Every subway student or enthusiast will return to it often to browse the pages or to research a specific car series. It is an indispensable companion to prior or future general histories of one of the world's greatest people movers.

Railfan and Railroad - Nate MacMaster

Sansone clearly knows his subject inside and out, and presents it in a fascinating, entertaining manner.

Industrial Archaeology - Efstathios I. Pappas

Well organized and provides an abundance of data in both written and pictorial form.

Choice

Sansone comprehensively examines more than 5,000 New York City subway cars... The book can be enjoyed by readers interested in transit car history while subway enthusiasts will appreciate the ease with which specific cars can be researched.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780801879227
  • Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
  • Publication date: 10/15/2004
  • Edition description: Centennial Edition
  • Pages: 528
  • Sales rank: 979,753
  • Product dimensions: 8.50 (w) x 11.00 (h) x 1.38 (d)

Meet the Author

Gene Sansone is the assistant chief mechanical officer of Car Equipment Engineering and Technical Support of MTA New York City Transit and an adjunct professor at Brooklyn Polytechnic University of New York.

Johns Hopkins University Press

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Table of Contents

The locomotive era 15
Historic IRT cars 27
Vintage BMT cars 101
R type New York City cars 179
App. A Subway car fundamentals 285
App. B Historic subway cars of the New York Transit Museum 289
App. C Specials 291
App. D The state-of-the-art car of 1974 299
App. E Redbird reefings 303
IRT technical data 329
BMT technical data 391
R type technical data 431
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