BN.com Gift Guide

The New York Times Will Shortz Presents Diabolical KenKen: 300 Logic Puzzles That Make You Smarter

Overview

Get ready for the biggest, baddest KenKen puzzles yet from the New York Times!

 

This New York Times edition of KenKen contains 300 5x5 and 7x7 size puzzles with "How to Solve" instructions and an introduction by puzzlemaster Will Shortz.  The puzzles use all four mathematical operations and increase in difficulty like they do in the Times.

Read More Show Less
... See more details below
Paperback (First Edition)
$8.61
BN.com price
(Save 13%)$9.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (13) from $2.12   
  • New (7) from $5.43   
  • Used (6) from $2.12   
Sending request ...

Overview

Get ready for the biggest, baddest KenKen puzzles yet from the New York Times!

 

This New York Times edition of KenKen contains 300 5x5 and 7x7 size puzzles with "How to Solve" instructions and an introduction by puzzlemaster Will Shortz.  The puzzles use all four mathematical operations and increase in difficulty like they do in the Times.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312644994
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 6/22/2010
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 319,425
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 5.18 (h) x 1.02 (d)

Meet the Author

TETSUYA MIYAMOTO, the creator of KenKen, is a math teacher who runs a unique mathematics class for grade school children in Japan where he practices “The Art of Teaching Without Teaching.” His teaching method and use of KenKen in his classroom has proven extremely successful. His students regularly go on to be accepted at the most prestigious schools in Tokyo.

 

WILL SHORTZ has been the crossword puzzle editor of The New York Times since 1993. He is also the puzzlemaster on NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday and is founder and director of the annual American Crossword Puzzle Tournament. He has edited countless books of crossword puzzles, Sudoku, KenKen, and all manner of brain-busters.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Introduction

 

If you consider all the world’s greatest puzzle varieties, the ones that have inspired crazes over the years—crosswords, jigsaw puzzles, tangrams, sudoku, etc.—they have several properties in common. They . . .

 

• Are simple to learn

• Have great depth

• Are variable in difficulty, from easy to hard

• Are mentally soothing and pleasing

• Have some unique feature that makes them different from everything else and instantly addictive

 

By these standards, a new puzzle called KenKen, the subject of the book you’re holding, has the potential to become one of the world’s greats.

KenKen is Japanese for “square wisdom” or “cleverness squared.” The rules are simple: Fill the grid with digits so as not to repeat a digit in any row or column (as in sudoku) and so the digits within each heavily outlined group of boxes combine to make the arithmetic result indicated.

The simplest KenKen puzzles start with 3 - 3 boxes and use only addition. Harder examples have larger grids and more arithmetic operations.

KenKen was invented in 2003 by Tetsuya Miyamoto, a Japanese math instructor, as a means to help his students learn arithmetic and develop logical thinking. Tetsuya’s education method is unusual. Put simply, he doesn’t teach. His philosophy is to make the tools of learning available to students and then let them progress on their own.

Tetsuya’s most popular learning tool has been KenKen, which his students spend hours doing and find more engaging than TV and video games.

It’s true that KenKen has great capacity for educating and building the mind. But first and foremost it’s a puzzle to be enjoyed. It is to numbers what the crossword puzzle is to words.

So turn the page and begin....

 

—Will Shortz

How to Solve KenKen

KenKen is a logic puzzle with simple rules:

 

• Fill the grid with digits so as not to repeat a digit in any row or column.

• Digits within each heavily outlined group of squares, called a cage, must combine to make the arithmetic result indicated.

• A 3 - 3– square puzzle will use the digits from 1 to 3, a 4 - 4–square puzzle will use the digits from 1 to 4, etc.

 

Solving a KenKen puzzle involves pure logic and mathematics. No guesswork is needed. Every puzzle has a unique solution.

In this volume of KenKen, the puzzles use all four arithmetic operations—addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division—in the following manner:

 

• In a cage marked with a plus sign, the given number will be the sum of the digits you enter in the squares.

• In a cage marked with a minus sign, the given number will be the difference between the digits you enter in the squares (the lower digit subtracted from the higher one).

• In a cage marked with a multiplication sign, the given number will be the product of the digits you enter in the squares.

• In a cage marked with a division sign, the given number will be the quotient of the digits you enter in the squares.

 

Take the 5 x 5– square example on this page.

To start, fill in any digits in 1 x 1 sections—in this puzzle, the 4 in the fourth row. These are literally no-brainers.

Next, look for sections whose given numbers are either high or low, or that involve distinctive combinations of digits, since these are often the easiest to solve. For example, the L-shaped group in the upper left has a product of 48. The only combination of three digits from 1 to 5 that multiplies to 48 is 3, 4, and 4. Since the two 4s can’t appear in the same row or column, they must appear at the ends of the L. The 3 goes between them.

Now look at the pair of squares in the first row with a sum of 3. The only two digits that add up to 3 are 1 and 2. We don’t know their order yet, but this information can still be useful.

Sometimes, the next step in solving a KenKen puzzle is to ignore the given numbers and use sudoku-like logic to avoid repeating a digit in a row or column. For example, now that 1, 2, 3, and 4 have been used or are slated for use in the first row, the remaining square (at the end of the row) must be a 5. Then the digit below the 5 must be a 1 for this pair of squares to have a difference of 4.

Next, consider the pair of squares in the third column with a product of 10. The only two digits from 1 to 5 that have a product of 10 are 2 and 5. We don’t know their order yet. However, the digit in the square above them, which we previously identified as either a 1 or a 2, must be 1, so as not to repeat a 2 in this column. The 2 that accompanies the 1 goes to its right.

Continuing in this way, using these and other techniques left for you to discover, you can work your way around the grid, filling in the rest of the squares. The complete solution is shown above.

 

Additional Tips

• In advanced KenKen puzzles, as you’ve seen, cages can have more than two squares. It’s okay for a cage to repeat a digit—as long as the digit is not repeated in a row or column.

• Cages with more than two squares will always involve addition or multiplication. Subtraction and division occur only in cages with exactly two squares.

• Remember, in doing KenKen, you never have to guess. Every puzzle can be solved by using step-by-step logic. Keep going, and soon you’ll be a KenKen master!

 

Excerpted from The New York Times will Shortz Presents Diabolical Kenken by Tetsuya Miyamoto.

Copyright © 2010 by KenKen Puzzle, LLC..

Published in 2010 by St. Martin's Griffin.

All rights reserved. This work is protected under copyright laws and reproduction is strictly prohibited. Permission to reproduce the material in any manner or medium must be secured from the Publisher.

Read More Show Less

First Chapter

The New York Times Will Shortz Presents Diabolical KenKen

300 Logic Puzzles That Make You Smarter
By Will Shortz

St. Martin's Griffin

Copyright © 2010 Will Shortz
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780312644994

Introduction
 
If you consider all the world’s greatest puzzle varieties, the ones that have inspired crazes over the years—crosswords, jigsaw puzzles, tangrams, sudoku, etc.—they have several properties in common. They . . .
 
• Are simple to learn
• Have great depth
• Are variable in difficulty, from easy to hard
• Are mentally soothing and pleasing
• Have some unique feature that makes them different from everything else and instantly addictive
 
By these standards, a new puzzle called KenKen, the subject of the book you’re holding, has the potential to become one of the world’s greats.
KenKen is Japanese for “square wisdom” or “cleverness squared.” The rules are simple: Fill the grid with digits so as not to repeat a digit in any row or column (as in sudoku) and so the digits within each heavily outlined group of boxes combine to make the arithmetic result indicated.
The simplest KenKen puzzles start with 3 ? 3 boxes and use only addition. Harder examples have larger grids and more arithmetic operations.
KenKen was invented in 2003 by Tetsuya Miyamoto, a Japanese math instructor, as a means to help his students learn arithmetic and develop logical thinking. Tetsuya’s education method is unusual. Put simply, he doesn’t teach. His philosophy is to make the tools of learning available to students and then let them progress on their own.
Tetsuya’s most popular learning tool has been KenKen, which his students spend hours doing and find more engaging than TV and video games.
It’s true that KenKen has great capacity for educating and building the mind. But first and foremost it’s a puzzle to be enjoyed. It is to numbers what the crossword puzzle is to words.
So turn the page and begin....
 
—Will Shortz
How to Solve KenKen
KenKen is a logic puzzle with simple rules:
 
• Fill the grid with digits so as not to repeat a digit in any row or column.
• Digits within each heavily outlined group of squares, called a cage, must combine to make the arithmetic result indicated.
• A 3 ? 3– square puzzle will use the digits from 1 to 3, a 4 ? 4–square puzzle will use the digits from 1 to 4, etc.
 
Solving a KenKen puzzle involves pure logic and mathematics. No guesswork is needed. Every puzzle has a unique solution.
In this volume of KenKen, the puzzles use all four arithmetic operations—addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division—in the following manner:
 
• In a cage marked with a plus sign, the given number will be the sum of the digits you enter in the squares.
• In a cage marked with a minus sign, the given number will be the difference between the digits you enter in the squares (the lower digit subtracted from the higher one).
• In a cage marked with a multiplication sign, the given number will be the product of the digits you enter in the squares.
• In a cage marked with a division sign, the given number will be the quotient of the digits you enter in the squares.
 
Take the 5 ? 5– square example on this page.
To start, fill in any digits in 1 ? 1 sections—in this puzzle, the 4 in the fourth row. These are literally no-brainers.
Next, look for sections whose given numbers are either high or low, or that involve distinctive combinations of digits, since these are often the easiest to solve. For example, the L-shaped group in the upper left has a product of 48. The only combination of three digits from 1 to 5 that multiplies to 48 is 3, 4, and 4. Since the two 4s can’t appear in the same row or column, they must appear at the ends of the L. The 3 goes between them.
Now look at the pair of squares in the first row with a sum of 3. The only two digits that add up to 3 are 1 and 2. We don’t know their order yet, but this information can still be useful.
Sometimes, the next step in solving a KenKen puzzle is to ignore the given numbers and use sudoku-like logic to avoid repeating a digit in a row or column. For example, now that 1, 2, 3, and 4 have been used or are slated for use in the first row, the remaining square (at the end of the row) must be a 5. Then the digit below the 5 must be a 1 for this pair of squares to have a difference of 4.
Next, consider the pair of squares in the third column with a product of 10. The only two digits from 1 to 5 that have a product of 10 are 2 and 5. We don’t know their order yet. However, the digit in the square above them, which we previously identified as either a 1 or a 2, must be 1, so as not to repeat a 2 in this column. The 2 that accompanies the 1 goes to its right.
Continuing in this way, using these and other techniques left for you to discover, you can work your way around the grid, filling in the rest of the squares. The complete solution is shown above.
 
Additional Tips
• In advanced KenKen puzzles, as you’ve seen, cages can have more than two squares. It’s okay for a cage to repeat a digit—as long as the digit is not repeated in a row or column.
• Cages with more than two squares will always involve addition or multiplication. Subtraction and division occur only in cages with exactly two squares.
• Remember, in doing KenKen, you never have to guess. Every puzzle can be solved by using step-by-step logic. Keep going, and soon you’ll be a KenKen master!
 
Excerpted from The New York Times will Shortz Presents Diabolical Kenken by Tetsuya Miyamoto.
Copyright © 2010 by KenKen Puzzle, LLC..
Published in 2010 by St. Martin's Griffin.
All rights reserved. This work is protected under copyright laws and reproduction is strictly prohibited. Permission to reproduce the material in any manner or medium must be secured from the Publisher.

Continues...

Excerpted from The New York Times Will Shortz Presents Diabolical KenKen by Will Shortz Copyright © 2010 by Will Shortz. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)