The New York Trilogy: City of Glass/Ghosts/The Locked Room by Paul Auster, Art Spiegelman |, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
New York Trilogy

New York Trilogy

3.8 37
by Paul Auster
     
 

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Paul Auster's brilliant debut novels, City of Glass, Ghosts, and The Locked Room brought him international acclaim for his creation of a new genre, mixing elements of the standard detective fiction and postmodern fiction.

City of Glass combines dark, Kafka-like humor with all the suspense of a Hitchcock film as a writer of detective stories becomes embroiled in a

Overview

Paul Auster's brilliant debut novels, City of Glass, Ghosts, and The Locked Room brought him international acclaim for his creation of a new genre, mixing elements of the standard detective fiction and postmodern fiction.

City of Glass combines dark, Kafka-like humor with all the suspense of a Hitchcock film as a writer of detective stories becomes embroiled in a complex and puzzling series of events, beginning with a call from a stranger in the middle of the night asking for the author — Paul Auster — himself. Ghosts, the second volume of this interconnected trilogy, introduces Blue, a private detective hired to watch a man named Black, who, as he becomes intermeshed into a haunting and claustrophobic game of hide-and-seek, is lured into the very trap he has created.

The final volume, The Locked Room, also begins with a mystery, told this time in the first-person narrative. The nameless hero journeys into the unknown as he attempts to reconstruct the past which he has experienced almost as a dream. Together these three fictions lead the listener on adventures that expand the mind as they entertain.

"Auster harnesses the inquiring spirit any reader brings to a mystery, redirecting it from the grubby search for a wrongdoer to the more rarified search for the self." (New York Times Book Review)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780571276653
Publisher:
Faber and Faber
Publication date:
06/28/2011

Meet the Author

Paul Auster’s most recent novel, Timbuktu, was a national bestseller, as was I Thought My Father Was God, the NPR National Story Project anthology, which he edited. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Brooklyn, New York
Date of Birth:
February 3, 1947
Place of Birth:
Newark, New Jersey
Education:
B.A., M.A., Columbia University, 1970

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New York Trilogy 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 37 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this based on both the blurbs and the reviews. I should have known better. I wonder if I read the same book as the others who have raved about this -- the 'twists' and turns were obvious, the characters were completely disposible and mostly irrelevant -- none had any depth. The stories -- each had potential, but it seemed as though he got tired halfway through and then gave it an obvious escape clause and typed 'the end.' None of these stories gave me much pause about the nature of identity, the sense of self, etc that others claim -- that may mean that I'm too dense to see the questions, or the questions presented here were the one's that occurred to me when I was 16 and had a bong attached to my face... The last story was the best of the lot, but it too collapsed at the finish line. Too bad. Overall, the stories were well concieved, poorly written, sparsely populated with thin characters about whom we care little, and ultimately trite. If you want a thriller that posses good questions about identity, reality, and sense of self, try Crime and Punishment, by Doestoyevski. That is a great story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I originaly heard about the series from a radiolab series. It sounded interesting so I decide to check it out. I read the first book and thought it was horrible. I kept reading hoping it would get interesting but alas it left me disappointed. Perhaps you will enjoy it if you love looking into the symbolism of a story. I found it boring and poorly written, if I could I would rate it with no stars.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book has the rare combination of qualities that qualify it as re-readable. There is enough fibre to it to allow digestion to occur over a long period of time, and each reading will reveal new perspectives.

If at first you're confused and think you've stumbled onto some sort of high-art form of detective novels, you've basically got the right idea. Fortunately, Auster goes much deeper, weaving an intricate and complex thread throughout the stories of this trilogy. Though each can stand on the strength of its tale on its own, together they form a triptych which forces you as the reader to continually refer to each portion again and again.

Guest More than 1 year ago
Paul Auster writes books that define the human psyche. A writer sets out to discover the truth about someone and, instead of unraveling the mystery, learns more about himself than he can imagine. By reading this book, you will also discover what lies deep within your mind.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book blew me away. Read it. Auster's voice is so likeable, readable, in all three stories. He writes an intellectual noir, where the setting is not Chandler's L.A. or, ultimately, even New York, but rather the novel itself. The act of creativity, writing in particular, is likened to solving a mystery. The private eye's search for answers mirrors the writer's search for a story, even an identity. There is so much intentional blurring of the two worlds, so many levels on which the 'fictional' confronts the 'real' space which exists outside the parameters of the story, that the journey through the book is pretty breathtaking. If it sounds heady, or even pretentious, it isn't. Just a great, great read.
kmoffat More than 1 year ago
I read the first and half of the second story. I can go no further. I feel I'm wasting my time. Sorry, maybe I'm just too stupid to understand.....
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