New Zapata [NOOK Book]

Overview

It’s 2052, and there’s one less state in the union. Texas, now known as the Republic of Texas, has seceded, just like it did in 1861, though for different reasons this time.

Rebecca lives in New Zapata, a border town in The Republic of Texas. She’s nineteen years old, born and raised in the R of T, and doesn’t remember a time when things were different, though her Aunt ...
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New Zapata

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Overview

It’s 2052, and there’s one less state in the union. Texas, now known as the Republic of Texas, has seceded, just like it did in 1861, though for different reasons this time.

Rebecca lives in New Zapata, a border town in The Republic of Texas. She’s nineteen years old, born and raised in the R of T, and doesn’t remember a time when things were different, though her Aunt Cathy does. Rebecca’s married to Chad, the boy who charmed her into an unplanned pregnancy. She loves her young son, Luke, but she almost died giving birth to him.

That means Rebecca has a problem. Because in New Zapata, birth control and abortion are illegal. So is divorce. And Chad thinks sex is his husbandly right.

There’s an underground of sorts in The R of T, and it reaches even as far as sleepy New Zapata. A group of older women—Rebecca’s Aunt Cathy and some others—have been gathering under the guise of having Bunco parties to try to help women in Rebecca’s position. These ladies remember a time when things were different, when women did have choices.

But it’s a dangerous game to defy the R of T.
Rebecca and her friends may end up playing for their lives.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940016318035
  • Publisher: Teri Hall
  • Publication date: 2/26/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 666,548
  • File size: 404 KB

Meet the Author

Teri Hall writes books.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 17, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Dystopian fiction, besides taking place in a society that is the

    Dystopian fiction, besides taking place in a society that is the opposite of a utopia, typically explores some of the reasons that things are so bad. An example familiar to many is Orwell’s Nineteen Eight-Four. Usually these reasons are related to current real world issues and extrapolate what the results of continuing in a particular direction might be. New Zapata does exactly that, taking aim at recent attempts in the US to decrease the rights women have over their own reproductive systems.




    When a novel takes a political stance, which is almost always going to be the case with this genre, and it’s on a current issue where emotions run high, as with this one, some authors focus too hard on making their case and not hard enough on telling the story well. When that happens, even if the reader’s politics make them sympathetic to the message, the book is still going to be a failure. I’ve previously read two books that attempted to tackle this same issue. In spite of agreeing with the authors’ politics and wanting them to be successful making their point, both those books fell short. New Zapata didn’t. There are several reasons why.




    The most obvious reason this story worked is the author resisted the urge to preach and concentrated on telling the story. The premise didn’t stretch credibility too far (I’d guess there are even a fair number of people who think this result would be a good one). How women reacted was very believable, not unlike how different oppressed groups have reacted in other places and times. I loved the characters, especially Rebecca and her aunt, was pulling for them, and the story got me thinking. Can’t ask for more than that.




    **Originally written for "Books and Pals" book blog. May have received a free review copy. ** 

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2013

    J

    Very good book!!! It kept me interested the whole time, really great character developement and unique plot. My only complait is that there isnt a sequal :)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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