The Newcomes (Barnes & Noble Digital Library): Memoirs of a Most Respectable Family [NOOK Book]

Overview


In this sweeping novel that spans decades, Thackeray tells of the virtuous and upstanding Colonel Thomas Newcome and of his son Clive. After Clive’s mother dies, he is sent to school and studies his true passion, art. Set in the mid 1800s, the novel explores the theme of life repeating itself from one generation to the next—for example, the tendency to sacrifice love in favor of marrying for financial security or for social position. A masterful portrayal of life and satire of snobbery in the early Victorian ...

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The Newcomes (Barnes & Noble Digital Library): Memoirs of a Most Respectable Family

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Overview


In this sweeping novel that spans decades, Thackeray tells of the virtuous and upstanding Colonel Thomas Newcome and of his son Clive. After Clive’s mother dies, he is sent to school and studies his true passion, art. Set in the mid 1800s, the novel explores the theme of life repeating itself from one generation to the next—for example, the tendency to sacrifice love in favor of marrying for financial security or for social position. A masterful portrayal of life and satire of snobbery in the early Victorian age.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781411464582
  • Publisher: Barnes & Noble
  • Publication date: 12/5/2011
  • Series: Barnes & Noble Digital Library
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 936
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author


William Makepeace Thackeray (1811–1863), a British satirical writer, also wrote magazine articles and travel books. His most devoted readers were lords and ladies, whom he satirized in his works. He is best known for his novels Vanity Fair and The Luck of Barry Lyndon, which skewer the pretensions of English high society.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2000

    Victorian Mini-Series

    If you're not reading 'The Newcomes' for class, and possibly if you are, your first reaction may be 'how am I going to read this 1,000 page monster?' Relax. It's not Proust. 'The Newcomes' is the book version of an old serial novel, published (and written) in installments--the nearest thing the Victorians had to the TV miniseries. The analogy goes further: it's a good story, the characters are endearing or villainous as need be, and if you'll sit down with the thing for a couple of hours, you'll probably find yourself liking it, and even wishing that the average miniseries were this good. Thackeray is funny, which helps a lot, and he keeps the plot turning and twisting. I liked it better even than 'Vanity Fair,' T's reputed masterpiece. Like I said, it's not Proust--not as deep, nor as rewarding philosophically or aesthetically. But it's more entertaining in the short run, and you don't have to reread any pages to figure out what the hell is going on. Go on, give it a shot. (I should confess that I read 'Newcomes' in the first place as a proofreader for this edition. However, the mere fact that after going through the whole thing, word by word, three times, I can still bear to remember it, let alone recommend it, sings Thackeray's praises more eloquently than I can here.)

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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