News from Heaven: The Bakerton Stories

( 19 )

Overview

The bestselling author of Faith and The Condition, Jennifer Haigh returns with a collection of unforgettable short stories centered around the vividly imagined world of Bakerton, Pennsylvania—the setting of her beloved novel Baker Towers—a coal-mining town rocked by decades of painful transition. From its heyday during two world wars through its slow decline, Bakerton is a town that refuses to give up gracefully, binding succeeding generations to the place that made them. With a revolving cast of characters,...

See more details below
Hardcover
$19.19
BN.com price
(Save 26%)$25.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (41) from $1.99   
  • New (10) from $3.47   
  • Used (31) from $1.99   
News from Heaven: The Bakerton Stories

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.99
BN.com price

Overview

The bestselling author of Faith and The Condition, Jennifer Haigh returns with a collection of unforgettable short stories centered around the vividly imagined world of Bakerton, Pennsylvania—the setting of her beloved novel Baker Towers—a coal-mining town rocked by decades of painful transition. From its heyday during two world wars through its slow decline, Bakerton is a town that refuses to give up gracefully, binding succeeding generations to the place that made them. With a revolving cast of characters, these stories explore how our roots, the families and places in which we are raised, shape the people we eventually become.

News from Heaven looks unflinchingly at the conflicting human desires for escape and for connection, and explores the enduring hold of home.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

The New York Times - Janet Maslin
…Ms. Haigh is one of the most subtle, incisive fiction writers currently exploring the dynamics of big, secretive families, the kinds whose members are much more apt to betray private thoughts than speak them out loud. Throughout News From Heaven, her combined gifts for piercing acuity and discreet understatement make a powerful mix…Although News from Heaven may sound full of sad situations, it's an uplifting and radiant book…It is Ms. Haigh's great gift to make all of these people come alive and to make readers really care how their destinies unfold.
The Washington Post - Yvonne Zipp
…outstanding…Haigh returns to fictional Bakerton, Pa., site of her Baker Towers, to exceptional effect…For Haigh, this small town is a large canvas, one filled in with precise, poignant strokes.
Publishers Weekly
After her success with Baker Towers (2005), Haigh returns to the familiarity of Bakerton, Pennsylvania-the small coal mining "town of churches and bars" where "everybody knows your business"- for this short story collection that weaves through the generations of hopes, dreams, and regrets of a community. A dwindling "company town" set with identical "company houses", the mines had "employed nearly every man in town," but when they fail the residents were left to flounder. Some leave for better opportunities, like 16 year-old Annie who heads to New York City, hired as a housekeeper by an Upper West Side family. Sandy also flees Bakerton, its "bleak small-town life worse than jail," but his life of moving and gambling give him no peace of mind. And there are those who stay, such as Sandy's dependable sister Joyce, who could never leave because "freedom is, to her, unimaginable, as exotic as walking on the moon." The melancholia of these interconnected stories exude guilt, disappointment, and terminated dreams alongside a quiet strength in the memories of each former or current resident. Haigh skillfully explores a community and their conflicting sentiments of family and responsibility against desires for a future beyond the narrow scope of their hometown. Agent: Dorian Karchmar, William Morris Endeavor.
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
Booklist
“Haigh has a gift for creating believable characters of all kinds and placing them into realistic—often heartbreaking—situations. A must read for fans of Baker Towers and a good addition to all short-story collections.”
(3 1/2 stars) - People Magazine
"Elegant stories. . . . Haigh uses well-timed plot twists to infuse them with bright new energy."
Kirkus Reviews
Despite its treacly title, this collection of short stories shows depth, understanding and compassion rather than sentimentality. Most of the stories take place in or near Bakerton, Pa., populated largely by Polish and Italian Catholic immigrants. "Beast and Bird," the initial story in the collection, takes us back to World War II and focuses on the life of Annie Lubicki, a serving girl for the Nudelmans in New York City's Upper West Side. Annie's life is one of domestic dreariness and loneliness. She meets a potential boyfriend, Jim, on a double date, but his anti-Semitism troubles her. Instead, she feels drawn to Daniel Nudelman, the son in the family, but she's displaced when the Nudelmans' nephew permanently "visits" from Poland to escape the ravages of the war. In "Broken Star," Regina's Aunt Melanie comes to visit Regina along with her daughter, Tilly. Regina hasn't seen her aunt in over 12 years and questions the lengthy stay by relatives she feels are intrusive. Only years later does she discover that Melanie, who has died, was actually her sister and that Melanie had needed a kidney and was desperately looking for a donor who matched. "A Place in the Sun" introduces us to Sandy, who's trying to fight a gambling compulsion but counter-intuitively takes his girlfriend, Marnie, to Vegas to celebrate his birthday. We find that for years he's been trying to escape the life he left behind in Bakerton--a father who died in the mines and a "bleak small-town life worse than jail, a prison from which no one escaped." Haigh's narratives are beautifully realized stories of heartbreak, of qualified love and of economic as well as personal depression.
Janet Maslin
“An uplifting and radiant book.”
People
“Elegant stories. . . . Haigh uses well-timed plot twists to infuse them with bright new energy.”
Boston Globe
“A vibrant, thought-provoking, profoundly readable contribution to the genre. . . . Each of these ten linked stories represents a distinct, shining example of Haigh’s remarkable gifts for lyricism, psychological insight, and stealth humor.”
People (3 ½ stars)
“Elegant stories. . . . Haigh uses well-timed plot twists to infuse them with bright new energy.”
Jim Shepard
“Jennifer Haigh’s stories rove across time and cultures as easily as they render the tendernesses and longings and hardscrabble deprivations of home. NEWS FROM HEAVEN is well-named, given that its unsentimental compassion and observational acuity. . . is just what we need right now.”
Richard Russo
“The characters in Jennifer Haigh’s NEWS FROM HEAVEN are so vividly drawn, the inner lives revealed so deftly, with such intelligence and sympathy, that fictional Bakerton, Pennsylvania, takes on the additional weight of, say, Winesburg, Ohio.”
bestselling author Ron Rash
“Jennifer Haigh has accomplished what James Joyce did in Dubliners and Sherwood Anderson in Winesburg, Ohio: render a place with such exactitude the landscape, character, and fate are inextricably linked. One of America’s finest novelists, Haigh is now one of our finest short story writers as well.”
Ron Rash
“Jennifer Haigh has accomplished what James Joyce did in Dubliners and Sherwood Anderson in Winesburg, Ohio: render a place with such exactitude the landscape, character, and fate are inextricably linked. One of America’s finest novelists, Haigh is now one of our finest short story writers as well.”
Washington Post
“Outstanding… News From Heaven fits quite comfortably in the company of the hybrid novel-in-stories made so popular by predecessors such as Jhumpa Lahiri…and Elizabeth Strout…For Haigh, this small town is a large canvas, one filled in with precise, poignant strokes.”
New York Times
“Haigh has a fine eye for how time works on characters’ theories about themselves…. Haigh, whose first book won the PEN/Hemingway Award, has a sure grip on her characters and a belief in place as a determining factor in the shapes of our lives.”
New York Times Book Review
“Haigh has a fine eye for how time works on characters’ theories about themselves…. Haigh, whose first book won the PEN/Hemingway Award, has a sure grip on her characters and a belief in place as a determining factor in the shapes of our lives.”
People
“Elegant stories. . . . Haigh uses well-timed plot twists to infuse them with bright new energy.”
Library Journal
These connected short stories, set in the coal-mining town of Bakerton, PA, span the 1940s to the present. Beautifully written and deeply moving, they feature characters whose lives have not turned out the way they had imagined. In "Beast and Bird," a young woman gets a brief taste of a very different life when she's hired as a maid for a wealthy family. In "Broken Star," the narrator belatedly understands her real relationship to her aunt. The main character in "A Place in the Sun" battles addiction to try to be the man everyone wants him to be. One character, Joyce Novak, appears in several of the stories at various points in her life, her struggles some of the most haunting in the book. Some episodes end painfully, but occasionally the protagonists rise up and find hope and strength amid the disappointments. All of their struggles linger in the mind. This is a masterly collection. VERDICT Highly recommended for fans of Haigh's novel Baker Towers, which features some of the same characters, and of Anne Tyler and Elizabeth Strout, who also excel at re-creating small-town life. [See Prepub Alert., 8/27/12.]—Evelyn Beck, Piedmont Technical Coll., Greenwood, SC
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060889647
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 1/29/2013
  • Pages: 244
  • Sales rank: 1,406,111
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Jennifer Haigh

Jennifer Haigh is the author of The Condition, Baker Towers, and Mrs. Kimble, winner of the PEN/Hemingway Award for debut fiction. Her short stories have appeared in The Atlantic, Granta, the Saturday Evening Post, and many other publications. She lives in the Boston area.

Biography

The daughter of a librarian and a high school English teacher, Jennifer Haigh was raised with her older brother in the coal-mining town of Barnesboro, Pennsylvania. Although she began writing as a student at Dickinson College, her undergraduate degree was in French. After college, she moved to France on a Fulbright Scholarship, returning to the U.S. in 1991.

Haigh spent most of the decade working in publishing, first for Rodale Press in Pennsylvania, then for Self magazine in New York City. It was not until her 30th birthday that she was bitten by the writing bug. She moved to Baltimore (where it was cheaper to live), supported herself as a yoga instructor, and began to publish short stories in various literary magazines. She was accepted into the prestigious Iowa Writers' Workshop and enrolled in their two-year M.F.A. program. While she was at Iowa, she completed the manuscript for her first novel, Mrs. Kimble. She also caught the attention of a literary agent scouting the grad school for new talent and was signed to a two-book contract. Haigh was astonished at how quickly everything came together.

Mrs. Kimble became a surprise bestseller when it was published in 2003. Readers and critics alike were bowled over by this accomplished portrait of a "serial marrier" and the three wives whose lives he ruins. The Washington Post raved, "It's a clever premise, backed up by three remarkably well-limned Mrs. Kimbles, each of whom comes tantalizingly alive thanks to the author's considerable gift for conjuring up a character with the tiniest of details." The novel went on to win the PEN/Hemingway Award for Outstanding First Fiction.

Skeptics who wondered if Haigh's success had been mere beginner's luck were set straight when Baker Towers appeared in 2005. A multigenerational saga set in a Pennsylvania coal-mining community in the years following WWII, the novel netted Haigh the PEN/L.L. Winship Award for outstanding book by a New England author. (Haigh lives in Massachusetts.) The New York Times called it "captivating," and Kirkus Reviews described it as "[a]lmost mythic in its ambition, somewhere between Oates and Updike country, and thoroughly satisfying." High praise indeed for a sophomore effort.

In fact, Haigh continues to produce dazzling literary fiction in both its short and long forms, much of it centered on the interwoven lives of families. When asked why she returns so often to this theme, she answers, " In fact, every story is a family story: we all come from somewhere, and it's impossible to write well-developed characters without giving a great deal of thought to their childhood environments, their early experiences, and whose genetic material they're carrying around."

Good To Know

In our interview with Haigh, she shared some fun facts about herself:

"All my life I've fantasized about being invisible. I love the idea of watching people when they don't know they're being observed. Novelists get to do that all the time!"

"When I was a child, I told my mother I wanted to grow up to be a genie, a gas station attendant, or a writer. I hope I made the right choice."

Read More Show Less
    1. Hometown:
      Boston, Massachusetts
    1. Date of Birth:
      October 16, 1968
    2. Place of Birth:
      Barnesboro, Pennsylvania
    1. Education:
      B.A., Dickinson College, 1990; M.F.A., Iowa Writers' Workshop, 2002

Read an Excerpt

News From Heaven


By Jennifer Haigh

HarperCollins Publishers

Copyright © 2013 Jennifer Haigh
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-06-088964-7


Excerpt

CHAPTER 1

BEAST AND BIRD


Every Sunday morning, at seven o'clock promptly, the two Polish girls crossed the park and walked fifty blocks downtown to church. Early morning: the avenue wide as a farmer's field, the sunlight tempered with frost. The girls were bare-legged, in ankle socks and long coats, their blond hair dark at the ends from their morning ablutions. The younger, Annie Lubicki, was also the prettier. She had just turned sixteen.

Knowing less, Annie listened more than she spoke. Frances Zroka was three years older, a city girl from Passaic, New Jersey.

Occasionally she went on dates. Annie had seen her waiting at the curb—wearing dark lipstick, nylon stockings instead of socks, a pocketbook looped over her elbow. Annie had never been on a date. She spent her free day looking in shop windows or sitting alone in the park.

The girls walked quickly, both excited. A date had taken place the night before. Frances offered each detail delicately, like the tinned butter cookies Mrs. Nudelman favored, each in its own dainty paper cup. The young man had taken her to a restaurant.

"He wore a fancy shirt, with cuff links. You know." She pantomimed buttoning at her wrists.

"Yes," Annie said, because an answer seemed to be required. She might have guessed what cuff links were, but she wouldn't have been sure. She was a girl to whom people gave instructions. Mrs. Nudelman directed her in English and in Polish, which Annie understood; and sometimes in Yiddish, which she did not. The repetition didn't bother her. She liked knowing what was expected, the exact requirements of serving and washing up, which in the Nudelmans' kitchen were precise indeed.

Church bells rang in the distance. In a few hours taxicabs would clog the avenue; the neighborhood women would crowd the bakeries, wealthy matrons, beautifully dressed. But for now the girls owned the sidewalk. They could have danced there, if they wanted to. They could have turned cartwheels in the street.

"This way," said Frances, pointing down a side street. "It's quicker."

They turned a sharp corner, Annie glancing over her shoulder looking for landmarks, knowing it was hopeless. At home in Pennsylvania she could find her way through a forest at night. The woods were full of helpful markers, simple and unmistakable. Water flowed downhill. The sun rose in the east. City streets had their own order—surely they did—but to Annie the patterns were invisible. Her first weeks in New York, she'd gotten lost daily. Kind strangers had returned her to the apartment. Now she could locate the fish market and the butcher; by retracing her steps, she could find her way back. Any further exploration of the city terrified her.

"He paid for everything," Frances reported. "After dinner we had lemon cake."

The bells grew louder, and Annie recognized the church halfway down the block, the familiar towering steeple. As always, her friend had been right.

In the street they tied scarves over their hair.

They were serving girls, employed by families on the Upper West Side. The families, the Nudelmans and the Grossmans, lived one floor apart. The girls inhabited the back corners of the apartments, small square rooms identical except for their color. Her friend's room had pink walls. Annie's was painted white.

She had come to New York three days after Christmas. A slow train had delivered her to Penn Station, a ten hour journey from Bakerton, Pennsylvania. Until that day she'd ridden only coal trains; the rickety local had standing space for passengers in the rear. Because the Nudelmans had paid her passage, Annie had a seat in a compartment. At the halfway point she ate an apple and a boiled egg, the lunch her mother had packed.

She was the eldest of nine children. In school she'd gone as far as the eighth grade. After that she'd kept house. Her father was a coal miner, and her mother preferred outdoor chores. The family garden covered an acre. There were chickens and a Jersey cow. Her mother milked, gathered, fed, and butchered; she hoed, watered, picked, and weeded. Certain plants she set aside for medicine, to soothe colic, rashes, dyspepsia, croup. Annie was the cook and the cleaner, the bather and the mender. Mondays and Thursdays she washed tubs of laundry—coal-black overalls, dozens of diapers. On Tuesdays she baked six loaves of bread.

A neighbor had told Annie's mother about the job in New York. Her own daughter kept house for Mrs. Nudelman's brother, who owned a glove factory in Newark. Mrs. Nudelman wanted a Polish girl like her brother's: quiet, a hard worker, a girl who did as she was told. The Nudelmans would feed and keep her. That they offered wages in addition, Annie's mother found incredible. It was late fall then, the outdoor chores finished. She could manage the house herself until springtime, when Annie's younger sister Helen would leave school.

Mr. Nudelman had met her train at the station, a square little man with a round beaming face. "Miss Lubicki!" he said, sounding elated, as though he had made a great discovery. He took her small suitcase and steered her by the elbow through the crowd. All the while he peppered her with questions. Was this her first visit to New York? As the train approached the city, had she seen the Empire State Building? Annie groped for answers, unused to such attention. He listened intently to her replies and nodded sagely, as though she'd said something profound. His quick dark eyes unnerved her, so she kept her eyes on the feather in his hat. The taxi ride passed quickly. She clutched the door handle as they cruised the wide avenues. Cars were rare in Bakerton. When one climbed the hill where her parents lived, her younger brothers ran into the street to stare.

Mr. Nudelman led her into the elevator, a contraption she recognized from the movies. He pulled shut the metal grille and the little cage rose noisily, a low grinding of gears. At the apartment door Mrs. Nudelman greeted her in Polish. She was a stout woman with a high bosom, her hair hidden by a flowered scarf. She showed Annie down a long corridor, past a series of closed doors. "My son's room," she whispered, stepping quietly. "He isn't well." Behind her Annie rose on tiptoe, conscious of her heavy shoes.

The apartment was not large, but its luxury astonished her.

Thick curtains draped the parlor windows. There was a sofa with a curving back, covered in burgundy velvet. Matching chairs flanked the fireplace. The dark wood floors were softened by carpets, intricately patterned: fruits and flowers and diamond shapes, outlined in green and gold.

Mrs. Nudelman led her into the kitchen and flicked on an overhead bulb. Annie blinked. For a moment it seemed the light had tricked her eyes. The kitchen had two of everything: two sinks of gleaming white porcelain; in opposite corners, two separate stoves. One stove was for noodle pudding and custards; the other for cholent and brisket, for roasting lamb and frying kreplach. "Simple," Mrs. Nudelman said in English. Meat was cooked on the big stove. The smaller one was for everything else.

Annie stared in silent wonder. Her English was as good as her Polish; she used them without preference, as she used her two legs. But Mrs. Nudelman spoke with a strange accent. Perhaps somehow she'd misunderstood.

She listened intently as Mrs. Nudelman repeated the instructions in Polish. There were two sets of pots, two dish towels, two drawers of spoons and forks. Two complete sets of dishes: fleishig plates with a red stripe around the border, milchig plates rimmed in blue. The dishes were to be washed in different sinks, dried with different towels. Meat was to be sliced on one counter, cheese on the other. If ever Annie made a mistake, she was to tell Mrs. Nudelman immediately. This was the most important thing. Annie nodded, keeping her eyes on the floor. She thought of the Klezek boy at home, who heard voices; a neighbor lady who scrubbed her hands until the skin cracked and bled. If Mrs. Nudelman were poor, her madness would be simpler; wealth permitted this elaborate variant. Annie's family had chicken soup on Sundays, meat on Christmas and Easter. There was nothing to keep separate. Her last supper at home had been fried cabbage and noodles, served on mismatched plates.

As Mrs. Nudelman talked, a boy appeared in the doorway behind her. He wore black trousers and a white shirt, open at the throat. He was perhaps Annie's age, tall and slender. His dark hair was wild, as though he'd come in from a storm.

"This is my son, Daniel," Mrs. Nudelman said in Polish. She spoke to him briefly in Yiddish. The boy smiled at Annie and bowed his head. Pinned there was a small black cap, nearly hidden by his curly hair.

Weeks passed. In the apartment Annie lived softly. She had never imagined rooms so easeful: the hissing radiator in her bedroom, the reliable heat of the bathroom tap, the clean simplicity of the gas stoves, the high smooth bed all to herself.

Outdoors was another matter. There wasn't any outdoors. Her first free afternoon, she followed Mr. Nudelman's directions to the park. A handsome stone wall screened it from traffic. Its lawns were clipped, its paths neatly paved. Annie sat on a bench and stared up at the sky. She thought of her mother, who would have lived as happily out in the open, slept in the field like a horse or a dog.

In New York the outdoors had furniture. The outdoors was just like the indoors.

The next morning she mailed two envelopes off to Bakerton: a letter for Helen to read to their mother, and one for Helen alone. In the first envelope she placed the bills Mr. Nudelman had given her, enough to buy flour and sugar, a little coal for the stove.

During the day she didn't think of her loneliness. She thought fleishig and milchig, red stripes and blue. She lived in horror of making a mistake, though what the consequences would be, she couldn't begin to guess. Preparing supper was her greatest anguish, the most taxing hour of the day. Serving did not unnerve her. It pleased her to move neatly around the table, silent as a ghost. Her employers scarcely noticed her. Their attention was focused, always, on their son. From soup to dessert, Daniel was questioned: what he had learned at school or read in the newspaper; his opinions and observations; the quality of his sleep and digestion; his worries, his plans. Poor Daniel, Annie thought as she cleared the table. She looked forward to cleaning up, the cheerful business of washing and drying. The dirty dishes she piled on a small table in the kitchen, afraid to place them on the counter top.

She preferred simple tasks, where the potential for error was slight: washing floors, mashing potatoes, chopping a mountain of carrots for the sweet stew Mrs. Nudelman loved. Then she could settle in and enjoy the warmth of the kitchen, the wash of sunlight from the window above the sink. The radio played Mrs. Nudelman's favorite programs, serials and news reports and, each day at noon, a musical revue. The announcer spoke in a booming voice: From atop the Loew's State Theatre Building, the B. Manischewitz Company, world's largest matzoh bakers, happily present Yiddish Melodies in Swing! Between songs came a torrent of words, some English, some foreign; in the announcer's sawing accent, they sounded nearly the same. The audience erupted periodically in raucous laughter. Annie listened intently, longing to share in their good time.

At night, the floors washed, she took tea and cake to Daniel, who studied late in his room. She knocked softly, opened the door, and set the plate and saucer at the corner of his desk. He wore round spectacles, a wool sweater over his white shirt. He didn't speak, just nodded courteously. In the morning, outside his door, she found the dishes on the floor.

She's been at the Nudelmans' a few weeks when she met Frances in the lobby downstairs. Another serving girl: Annie knew it immediately, without knowing how she knew. "Well, of course," Frances said when Annie told her this later. The daughters of the building had dark hair. All the serving girls were blond.

For two years Frances had worked at the Grossmans', where her duties were the same as Annie's: milchig and fleishig, the twin sinks and stoves. Mrs. Grossman was as crazy as Mrs. Nudelman. They shared the same mania for keeping things separate.

"But why?" Annie demanded.

"They're Jews," Frances said.

In two years she'd learned a few things about her employers. Mr. Grossman worked for his wife's father, a fat man who came to Friday dinner and ate enough for two. The Grossmans' youngest daughter was a little beauty, spoiled by her father. The oldler sisters were plain as milk. All three had large wardrobes, which required much ironing. Frances didn't care for these daughters, nor for any of the Grossmans. She was tired of living among Jews.

"Just wait until springtime," she told Annie as they walked to the fish market. "They'll work you like a slave." Last year Frances had cleaned late into the night, scrubbing down every inch of the kitchen. Mrs. Grossman had inspected all the pantry cabinets, looking for crumbs of bread.

Annie nodded, slightly puzzled. Though she cleaned the kitchen each night after dinner, it was never truly dirty. There was no coal stove to contend with, no small children's dirty shoes. On Thursdays both girls were free. Together they walked the avenues, looking in store windows. One evening they returned to their building and stepped into the open elevator. Too late, Annie saw Daniel Nudelman standing at the rear. She hesitated a moment, inexplicably embarrassed. If she had seen him first, she would have taken the stairs.

Daniel nodded silently. He reached past the girls and pulled shut the grille.

The elevator stopped at the second floor and Frances stepped out. "See you later," Annie said softly, aware of how the small space amplified her voice.
(Continues...)


Excerpted from News From Heaven by Jennifer Haigh. Copyright © 2013 by Jennifer Haigh. Excerpted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 19 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(7)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(5)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 19 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2013

    Terrible

    Dont waste your money

    36 out of 63 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 22, 2013

    Haigh¿s stories focus on the longings, loves, disappointments, a

    Haigh’s stories focus on the longings, loves, disappointments, and small consolations shaping the lives of the inhabitants of a declining coal mining town.  Her writing has a lovely simplicity, foregoing any fussy, pretentious wordplay at odds with unadorned, small-town Bakerton. The stories are loosely interconnected less by plot than by family ties, spanning several generations, and by the common theme of Bakerton’s power to inspire both escape and rootedness, often all within the same person. While melancholic at times, the stories are not melodramatic, and the characters are intriguing enough to hold the reader’s interest from start to finish.  

    29 out of 39 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2013

    News From Heaven

    There is a God, there is a Heaven

    15 out of 35 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2013

    Small Town Truth Teaches About Our Hidden Histories

    This collection of short stories, each of which can stand on its own, weave together in surprising and unpredictable ways, inviting the reader to reflect on how lives interact and comnect with one another over the course of collective life spans. Story by story the reader learns that life is brief, dependent on one another, and influenced by those we know, those we don't know, those we think we "know", and those who have gone before us.

    The lives of the characters, graciously and gently described, giving value to each one, will teach you to be kind to yourself. That is the news from heaven.

    12 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2013

    Great book

    Must read if you read Baker Towers

    12 out of 27 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 26, 2013

    Good stories

    Though the stories Jennifer Haight lack joy they are well written and genuine. Read them.

    5 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2013

    DUMB

    No way would I recommend this book. Plot is trite and the wriylting is subpar. Don't waste your time or money.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2013

    Sounds interesting

    I am now trying the free sample.I will tell you if it is good when I am done.

    3 out of 51 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2014

    Follow Up to Baker Falls

    I love the original book about Baker Falls. Ms. Haigh writes with such insight to people. Highly recommend if you read the first book. I lived in a town very similar to Baker Falls in Pennsylvania and recognize so many of the characters. Great book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2014

    Depressive

    Title and reviews suggested these were in the spiritual genre or romance someone prays between receipes combo. dank and gloom combo no relief by humor

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2013

    Not every book is a classic read the editoriial reviews and the blurbs then the reviews and in doubt the sample page

    If still in doubt if it would please borrow from the library on nook or a hard civer from your library through systems i can only aford to buy what i might want to reread. I buy the complete works of famous authors and often 3/4 of their works are dated boring abd repetitive e g every one dying of tb or typhoid in other words grow up stop whining. I am mom and I am 86 years old.

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 19 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)