Newspaperman: Inside the News Business at The Wall Street Journal

Newspaperman: Inside the News Business at The Wall Street Journal

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by Warren Phillips
     
 

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The captivating story of former Wall Street Journal publisher Warren Phillips’s rise to the top

Newspaperman is at once a fascinating narrative of one man's journey through the newspaper business and an expert analysis of how the news is made. Phillips shows what it's like to be a reporter as history unfolds around him and reveals how editors

Overview

The captivating story of former Wall Street Journal publisher Warren Phillips’s rise to the top

Newspaperman is at once a fascinating narrative of one man's journey through the newspaper business and an expert analysis of how the news is made. Phillips shows what it's like to be a reporter as history unfolds around him and reveals how editors and publishers debate and decide how the news will be covered.

Starting at the WSJ when it had a circulation of only 100,000, Phillips rose through the ranks, witnessing its rapid expansion to a circulation over two million—the country's highest. Newspaperman illustrates the life of a foreign correspondent, taking readers from Berlin to Belgrade, Athens to Ankara, London to Madrid. It also provides a look into the inner councils of the Pulitzer Prize Board as legendary editors, such as Ben Bradlee of The Washington Post and Clayton Kirkpatrick of The Chicago Tribune, debate journalistic ethics.

Warren H. Phillips began his journalism career as a copy boy at The New York Herald Tribune. He then served The Wall Street Journal as proofreader, copydesk hand, rewriteman, foreign correspondent, foreign editor, and Chicago editor before becoming managing editor at age thirty. He served in that post and as executive editor for thirteen years, and then was the WSJ's publisher and chief executive of its parent company, Dow Jones & Company, for another fifteen years.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In this engaging, straightforward book, Phillips, former managing editor at the Wall Street Journal and publisher/CEO of Dow Jones & Co., tells the dual story of his life as an iconic man of print and the maturation of the most influential business newspapers. His romance with the news business began with a tour of the fabled New York Daily News with his father as a child, continuing with a stint as a copyboy at the New York Herald Tribune, followed as a full-time German correspondent at WSJ, with stories filed in Greece, Turkey, and London. Phillips comes across as an industrious, resourceful, and hugely ambitious worker bee with his own ideas as he soars up the corporate ladder from managing editor posts in Chicago and New York before landing the plum jobs of publisher and CEO of WSJ's parent company, Dow Jones. He is especially candid about the CIA's overtures to use the paper as a cover, Asian and European triumphs and setbacks, the digital age's surprising potency, staff betrayals, and Rupert Murdoch's power grab. Reading Phillips's earnest, unadorned account of this prestigious publication is a solid refresher course in the history of the golden era of American newspapers. (Sept.)
Library Journal
For over a century, the Wall Street Journal has remained one of the most respected and informative sources of business and financial news throughout the world. One of the key figures behind the paper's success, Phillips traces his career with the paper in a concise, well-crafted memoir. Beginning in 1947 as a reporter and retiring in 1992 as publisher and CEO of parent company Dow Jones & Company, he records his experiences from reporting in the field in post-World War II Europe to presiding over the paper's profitable expansion into foreign markets to guiding the company through the transition into the digital era. He sprinkles his story with personal anecdotes and insights into the journalism profession. VERDICT Readers of "Greatest Generation" memoirs and biographies and journalism students will enjoy Phillips's work. For a similar read, see Richard J. Tofel's Restless Genius: Barney Kilgore, the Wall Street Journal, and the Invention of Modern Journalism.—Donna Marie Smith, Palm Beach Cty. Lib. Syst., FL
Kirkus Reviews

A memoir from a man who helped transform the Wall Street Journal from a local newspaper to a global operation.

When executive editor Bill Kerby and managing editor Buren McCormack hired the 21-year-old Phillips (China Behind the Mask, 1973, etc.) as a $40-per-week proofreader in 1947, daily circulation stood at 100,000. By 1991, when the author retired after serving as the publisher and CEO of Dow Jones & Co., the paper was the largest daily in the country with a circulation of around 2 million. Phillips provides insight into how one of the nation's most prominent newspapers evolved. The author was personally involved with much of the growth, after his transfer to London and then Germany to build the paper's operations in Europe, and he was integral to the development of the Wall Street Journal Asia and the paper's partnership with Japan's Nikkei index. Under his leadership in the '70s and '80s, the paper became a technological leader through its deployment of satellite communications and its embrace of digitization. Throughout then book, Phillips looks at his part in shaping the Journal's news and editorial coverage, and these sections provide insight into his highly successful methods. The author includes many anecdotes culled from his diaries, some very funny, which illustrate the variegated aspects of his life and the people who shared in it. In a short epilogue, Phillips discusses Rupert Murdoch's takeover of the Journal and its incorporation into News Corp.

A well-rounded autobiography about the journalism industry and the people who shaped the news over the past 50 years.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780071776912
Publisher:
McGraw-Hill Education
Publication date:
09/09/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
352
Sales rank:
1,013,400
File size:
3 MB

Meet the Author

Warren H. Phillips worked at The Wall Street Journal as proofreader, copydesk hand, rewriteman, foreign correspondent, foreign editor, and Chicago editor before becoming managing editor at age thirty. He was later promoted to publisher and CEO of its parent corporation, Dow Jones & Company. Phillips has also served as President of the American Society of Newspaper Editors and was a member of the Pulitzer Prize Board. He and his wife live in Bridgehampton, NY, and Palm Beach, FL.

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Newspaperman: Inside the News Business at The Wall Street Journal 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this newspaper article!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Dr_Wilson_Trivino More than 1 year ago
Atlanta, Georgia- A highlight of my day is to read a crisp and fresh copy of the Wall Street Journal. Their reporting is enlightening, informative, and insightful. I hope that this current high standard is a reflection from Warren Phillips who was a former publisher of The Wall Street Journal. In his book Warren Phillips, this newsman who started as a copyboy and his career span all the way the top, shares a memoir of a rich life. His life begins in Queens with hard working immigrant folks who gave him the freedom to dream. It was at 11, after taking a tour of the New York Daily News with his father, that he decided to go into the newspaper business. Phillips was a first hand witness to the aftermaths of War World II. He traveled all over the world and was one of the first western reporters to visit China. On interesting experience was when he presided over the first time they send via satellite a full copy of the newspaper to Europe. The feat then allowed within minutes that transmitted information be used to print a copy of the paper locally. This expanded the reach of up to date news. It seems like ancient history now with the internet, but this was a big deal then. Phillips candidly shares his problems with mental health and how he sought treatment after being able shake the sadness. He interacted with Presidents and was up close and personal within the hall of the political conventions. His career spanned a transformation period of the news business but the book is about the making of good journalist. After he retired from the newspaper he opened an independent publishing house seeking to put in print good books.