Newspapermen: Hugh Cudlipp, Cecil Harmsworth King and the Glory Days of Fleet Street [NOOK Book]

Overview

They were 'Cudlipp' and 'Mr King' when they met in 1935. At 21, gregarious, extrovert and irreverent Hugh Cudlipp had many years of journalistic experience: at 34, shy, introspective and solemn Cecil Harmsworth King, haunted by the ghost of Uncle Alfred, Lord Northcliffe, the great press magnate, and bitter towards Uncle Harold, Lord Rothermere of the Daily Mail, was fighting his way up in the family business.



Opposites in most respects, they were complementary in talents and...

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Newspapermen: Hugh Cudlipp, Cecil Harmsworth King and the Glory Days of Fleet Street

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Overview

They were 'Cudlipp' and 'Mr King' when they met in 1935. At 21, gregarious, extrovert and irreverent Hugh Cudlipp had many years of journalistic experience: at 34, shy, introspective and solemn Cecil Harmsworth King, haunted by the ghost of Uncle Alfred, Lord Northcliffe, the great press magnate, and bitter towards Uncle Harold, Lord Rothermere of the Daily Mail, was fighting his way up in the family business.



Opposites in most respects, they were complementary in talents and had in common a deep concern for the underdog. Cudlipp, the journalistic genius, and King, the formidable intellect, were to become, in Cudlipp's words, 'the Barnum and Bailey' of Fleet Street. Together, on the foundation of the populist Daily Mirror, they created the biggest publishing empire in the world.



Yet their relationship foundered sensationally in 1968, when - as King tried to topple the Prime Minister - Cudlipp toppled King. Through the story of two extraordinary men, Ruth Dudley Edwards gives us a riveting portrait of Fleet Street in its heyday.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Like the newspaper empire of William Randolph Hearst in America, the newspaper conglomerate and sensationalist press created by the Harmsworth family had a far-reaching impact on mass readership throughout the British Empire in the 20th century. Edwards, a prolific author of nonfiction and fiction (e.g., Murder in a Cathedral), shows how Cecil Harmsworth King, the nephew of Lord Alfred Northcliffe and Lord Harold Rothermere, along with talented editor Hugh Cudlipp, expanded upon the success of his Harmsworth uncles to turn the Daily Mirror, Sunday Pictorial, and other newspapers into widely read and influential media. These media were designed to inform by focusing on public affairs but stressed a tabloid format to appeal to a mass audience. In this scholarly study, Edwards interweaves the stories of these two newspapermen, using Dickensian detail to describe the personalities and backgrounds of the privileged King and the more modestly situated Cudlipp. On the whole, their stories merge to create a colorful and fascinating portrait of the newspaper world of early 1900s Britain. Highly recommended for large public libraries, journalism school libraries, and academic libraries with a mass communications collection.-Donna Marie Smith, Palm Beach Cty. Lib. Syst., FL Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781446485637
  • Publisher: Random House Adult Trade Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 1/31/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Ruth Dudley Edwards is an historian, journalist and crime writer. Her non-fiction includes Victor Gollancz: A Biography (winner of the James Tait Black Memorial Prize), The Pursuit of Reason: The Economist, 1843-1993 and The Faithful Tribe: An Intimate Portrait of the Loyal Institutions. Her nine crime novels are satires on the British Establishment.
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Customer Reviews

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 24, 2013

    Me too

    I get the rps, clans, mewpapers, and dens, but this has truely gone too far! Me myself, I think I AM one of the greatest Warrior fans, ever. At my house I write fanfiction. I have a Warriors poster on my wall. I read Warrior books day and night, and THIS is what happens; some group of cats/kids start using wings! WINGS! Great StarClan, whose mousebrained idea was this? Post here if you agree with me, and we, together can change the world! All you wonderful people out there who read this, thank you. ~Daisypelt

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2013

    Snowvlaw

    No it is stupid to hve powers in less you have a power rp

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