Nez Perce Summer 1877: The U. S. Army and Nee-Me-Poo Crisis

Nez Perce Summer 1877: The U. S. Army and Nee-Me-Poo Crisis

by Jerome A. Greene
     
 

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The great fighting retreat of the Nez Perces, struggling for their lives, lands, and freedom, outwitting and battling off one pursuing force after another, is one of the giant epics of the American West, and the literature about it is immense. But there is no volume like this monumental account of the war by Jerome A. Greene. Written by one of the foremost experts

Overview

The great fighting retreat of the Nez Perces, struggling for their lives, lands, and freedom, outwitting and battling off one pursuing force after another, is one of the giant epics of the American West, and the literature about it is immense. But there is no volume like this monumental account of the war by Jerome A. Greene. Written by one of the foremost experts in frontier military history and reviewed by members of the Nez Perce tribe, Nez Perce Summer, 1877 details the dozen armed encounters between U.S. Army troops and a desperate body of Nez Perces that spanned the long summer of 1877 in the wilds of Idaho, Wyoming, and Montana territories. A meticulously researched and well-written narrative, it chronicles a peopleÕs epic struggle to survive spiritually, culturally, and physically in the face of unrelenting military force. Sixteen maps detail troop and Indian movements and skirmishes, while 49 photographs further illuminate this dramatic conflict.
Between 100 and 150 of the more than 800 Nez Perce men, women, and children who began the trek were killed during the war. Almost as many died in the months following the surrender, after they were exiled to malaria-ridden northeastern Oklahoma. Army deaths numbered 113. The casualties, on both sides, were an extraordinary price for a war nobody wanted, but whose history has since intrigued generations of Americans.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"The story of the [Nez Perces'] escapes, hardships and ultimate defeat makes an epic struggle any Hollywood scriptwriter would admire. In Nez Perce Summer, Jerome A. Greene . . . is precise, even brilliant, in detailing the Nez Perce trail and the military groups that hounded them for weeks."ÑDenver Post

"Jerome A. Greene . . . gives the Nez Perce saga the attention it deserves. . . . Greene's expert treatment is detailed, but his narrative is never boring."ÑWild West

"The flight of Chief Joseph and the Nez Perces across mountain and plain in a quest for Canadian sanctuary is a commanding saga. . . . Applying his exceptional powers of research in breadth and depth, Jerome A. Greene has crafted the most exhaustive history yet published of this story of courage, endurance, pathos, and tragedy. His contribution fills in a wealth of missing detail and immeasurably enriches the extensive literature."ÑRobert M. Utley, author of The Lance and the Shield: The Life and Times of Sitting Bull

Library Journal
The war between the nontreaty Nez Perce and the United States in 1877 is one of the more dramatic in the history of such Western conflicts. The U.S. Army troops commanded by General Howard seemed hard-pressed to keep up with masterly campaigning by the Nez Perce, led by the highly capable Chief Joseph. The Nez Perce's conduct won admiration and sympathy from even the settlers in the region, although such sympathy did not help much when the Nez Perce inevitably lost and were sent to Oklahoma (then called Indian Territory). National Park historian Greene has spent many years working in the setting of the war and has written other well-received books on Indian wars, for example, Yellowstone Command: Colonel Nelson A. Miles and the Great Sioux War. Though many libraries will have Merrill D. Beal's well-known I Will Fight No More Forever or recent titles like Bruce Hampton's Children of Grace: The Nez Perce War of 1877 (LJ 1/94), Greene's book is a comprehensive, well-researched, and well-written study of the campaign and its aftermath. Highly recommended for libraries that need more than a basic title.--Charlie Cowling, Drake Memorial Lib., SUNY at Brockport Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.\
Booknews
Greene (research historian, National Park Service) recounts the fighting retreat of the nontreaty Nez Perces, including Chief Joseph, across nearly 1,000 miles of Pacific Northwest wilderness. Greene draws from both U.S. Army and Nez Perce sources to explain their circuitous route through Yellowstone National Park and their attempts to seek refuge among the Crow Indians. Twenty-six illustrations and photographs and 16 maps are included. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
In Nez Perce Summer 1877: The U.S. Army and the Nee-Me-Poo Crisis, research historian Jerome Green provides an informative, superbly researched, and wonderfully written account of the Nez Perce conflict with the larger white culture as represented by the U.S. Army. Green is one of those rare historians able to combine meticulous scholarship with a genuine flair for vividly drawn and engaging presented storytelling. Nez Perce Summer 1877 is ardently recommended reading for students of American frontier history in general, and Native American studies in particular.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780917298820
Publisher:
Montana Historical Society Press
Publication date:
10/01/2001
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
576
Sales rank:
937,981
Product dimensions:
6.01(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.58(d)

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