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Nicaragua's Other Revolution: Religious Faith and Political Struggle
     

Nicaragua's Other Revolution: Religious Faith and Political Struggle

by Michael Dodson
 

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Nicaragua's Other Revolution places the experience of the Nicaraguan Revolution in a historical framework that extends back to the Protestant Reformation and in an institutional frame-work that encompasses the whole Nicaraguan politics.

Overview

Nicaragua's Other Revolution places the experience of the Nicaraguan Revolution in a historical framework that extends back to the Protestant Reformation and in an institutional frame-work that encompasses the whole Nicaraguan politics.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
``The Nicaraguan revolution is highly unusual if not unique'' in its attitude toward religion, say the authors in this discussion of Nicaraguan religion and politics. While church and state have had conflicts during the past decade, these conflicts were not over governmental efforts to curtail or restrict religious practice, as was the case in most other Communist systems. Instead, the Sandinista government has used the institutions of the church to seek an end to the contra war, naming Cardinal Obando to head a national commission on reconciliation. The authors see the as-yet peaceful transition process from the Ortega to Chamorro governments as the balancing of the two strands in Nicaraguan religious and political belief: liberation and tradition. For academic collections.-- James Rhodes, Luther Coll., Decorah, Ia.
Booknews
Examining the broad process of religious change, the authors explore how that process interacted with the political struggles that culminated in the 1979 rebellion in Nicaragua. They conclude that the religious values and attitudes arising out of post-conciliar renewal in the church contributed powerfully to demands for revolutionary change. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
From the Publisher
"This original and thought-provoking book sheds important new light on religion's role in the Nicaraguan Revolution. By setting Nicaraguan experiences in a broad philosophical and historical context, the authors contribute to understanding not only Nicaragua, but also the more general issues raised by religion's role in social change and revolution."—Daniel H. Levine, University of Michigan

"A well-written overview of the unique history and conflicting roles of religion in the Nicaraguan Revolution, this book makes a particularly valuable contribution by setting the church-state and intra-church debate against the backdrop of conflicting models of democracy. . . . It will be a welcome resource for anyone interested in cutting through the confusion and disinformation surrounding the Nicaraguan Revolution in general and the roles of religion within it in particular."—Thomas W. Walker, Ohio University

"[Will] become the standard treatment of religion in the Nicaraguan revolution and of the effects of liberation theology on Nicaraguan politics. . . . Has a theoretical and comparative richness that will inform scholars and specialists. This is an excellent and useful book appropriate for courses ranging from Latin American politics to religion and politics."—Political Science Quarterly

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807818817
Publisher:
The University of North Carolina Press
Publication date:
03/28/1990
Edition description:
1
Pages:
296
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x (d)
Lexile:
1470L (what's this?)

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher
A well-written overview of the unique history and conflicting roles of religion in the Nicaraguan Revolution, this book makes a particularly valuable contribution by setting the church-state and intra-church debate against the backdrop of conflicting models of democracy. . . . It will be a welcome resource for anyone interested in cutting through the confusion and disinformation surrounding the Nicaraguan Revolution in general and the roles of religion within it in particular.—Thomas W. Walker, Ohio University

This original and thought-provoking book sheds important new light on religion's role in the Nicaraguan Revolution. By setting Nicaraguan experiences in a broad philosophical and historical context, the authors contribute to understanding not only Nicaragua, but also the more general issues raised by religion's role in social change and revolution.—Daniel H. Levine, University of Michigan

[Will] become the standard treatment of religion in the Nicaraguan revolution and of the effects of liberation theology on Nicaraguan politics. . . . Has a theoretical and comparative richness that will inform scholars and specialists. This is an excellent and useful book appropriate for courses ranging from Latin American politics to religion and politics.—Political Science Quarterly

Meet the Author

Michael Dodson is coauthor of Let My People Live.

Laura Nuzzi O'Shaughnesy is coauthor of The Church and Revolution in Nicaragua.

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