A Nice Tuesday

A Nice Tuesday

by Pat Jordan
     
 

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In A Nice Tuesday, Pat Jordan chronicles his decision to reclaim the failed potential of his youth. A young baseball pitcher of inordinate promise, Jordan had been one of the Milwaukee Braves first “bonus babies.” His struggle through the minor leagues and ultimate failure to play in the majors, eloquently chronicled in A False Spring, defined

Overview


In A Nice Tuesday, Pat Jordan chronicles his decision to reclaim the failed potential of his youth. A young baseball pitcher of inordinate promise, Jordan had been one of the Milwaukee Braves first “bonus babies.” His struggle through the minor leagues and ultimate failure to play in the majors, eloquently chronicled in A False Spring, defined his youth. At fifty-six, Jordan realizes that “this trivial thing” has also defined his life and decides to make a comeback. He whips himself back into playing condition and convinces an independent minor-league team, the Waterbury (Connecticut) Spirit, to let him return to the mound one last time. In this memoir, Jordan lays bare his midlife quest with honesty and humor, making A Nice Tuesday about much more than baseball.

Editorial Reviews

Jim Bouton

"Pat Jordan, the author of my favorite baseball book, A False Spring, has written the ultimate comeback story—a failed ballplayer and father reconstitutes himself as a loving husband and a helluva writer. Funny, sweet, and painfully honest, Jordan writes like he’s been injected with truth serum. A Nice Tuesday reads like an unauthorized autobiography. Jordan, the big league writer, will be remembered far longer than most of the big league ballplayers he aspired to join."—Jim Bouton, author of Ball Four
Library Journal
In his much-admired 1975 memoir A False Spring (Hungry Mind, 1998. reprint), Jordan told of his failure as a young aspiring pitcher and his successful rebirth as a journalist. Now, at 56, an age far past the end of even the best baseball careers, he labors to pitch once more, revisiting his youthful disappointment by joining a minor league team, the Waterbury (Connecticut) Spirit. He recalls his boyhood pitching promise, his domineering brother, and his alienated first wife and children. Though happily remarried with six beloved dogs and writing success, he struggles to pitch alongside teammates half his age. This second installment of Jordan's saga, often raunchy but still touching, is heartily recommended for both adult and young adult collections.--Morey Berger, St. Joseph's Hosp. Lib., Tucson, AZ Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Baseball serves as a secondary backdrop for this entertaining autobiographical account of a middle-aged man's pursuit of unfulfilled dreams. In the late 1950s, Jordan was a highly touted up-and-coming pitching phenom, but he managed only a few years of unsuccessful minor-league play. After leaving the sport in 1962, Jordan eventually became a freelance writer of articles and books (A False Spring, 1975, etc.), but despite his successes, he was still haunted by thoughts of what-could-have-been. Finally, at the age of 56, he returned to pitch one inning in a professional minor-league game for the Waterbury Spirit in Connecticut. While Jordan records vividly the chronology of this event and his physical and mental preparation for the challenge, the book is filled more with revelations of the author's past and with present-day anecdotes, as he tries to make sense of his life's time-worn journey. Some familiar sports names appear in the book, but it's the excellently drawn cast of colorful players in Jordan's life that dominate, including: Susan, his sensual and supportive wife; his older half-brother, George, a lawyer, whose unconditional love is mixed with wistful envy; and Brian LaBasco, the high school catcher who helps Jordan train and who reminds him of "the me I might have been." Even Jordan's pet dogs figure prominently: they teach him to love, genuinely and unabashedly. Jordan is a flawed and not particularly noble hero; in fact, his selfishness, weaknesses, and fears are revealed throughout. But this frankness is what gives overall credence to his story and ruminations, helped greatly by his skillful writing, which shifts easily from bawdy bravado to humor to insightfulintrospection. More a midlife coming-of-age memoir than sports book, a tale of growing older, of second chances, and of making peace with oneself.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780803276253
Publisher:
UNP - Bison Books
Publication date:
09/28/2005
Pages:
342
Product dimensions:
5.31(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.49(d)

Meet the Author


Pat Jordan is the author of numerous books, including the memoir A False Spring, also available in a Bison Books edition. He is a regular contributor to the New York Times Magazine, among other periodicals, and his work has been included in Best American Sports Writing, Best American Mystery Stories, Best American Essays, and the Norton Anthology of World Literature.

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