Niceness in the Nineties: An Indie Music Memoir

Overview

For general release MARCH 23rd, 2011.
Jim Miller was a touring guitarist and songwriter in the bands Black Angel's Death Song and Trash Can School in the early to mid nineties. In the latter half of that decade he was a band manager and a promoter for the legendary downtown L.A. dive Al's Bar.
At its core, this memoir is a club level look at the rise and fall of the music phenomenon known as grunge.
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Overview

For general release MARCH 23rd, 2011.
Jim Miller was a touring guitarist and songwriter in the bands Black Angel's Death Song and Trash Can School in the early to mid nineties. In the latter half of that decade he was a band manager and a promoter for the legendary downtown L.A. dive Al's Bar.
At its core, this memoir is a club level look at the rise and fall of the music phenomenon known as grunge.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780578072142
  • Publisher: Pleasant Peasant, LLC
  • Publication date: 2/28/2011
  • Pages: 256
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.54 (d)

Meet the Author

Jim Miller (James Edward Robert) was born in Chicago on August 9th, 1960. He was raised just six blocks from White Sox Park.
Inspired by the punk scene of the late seventies he picked up a guitar and soon learned he could write songs.
In the early eighties he was in a band called The New Balladeers, an anti-synthesizer project ala REM and The Violent Femmes. By early 1985 he was in Los Angeles seeking fame and fortune.
This memoir recounts his exploits in the West Coast music scene. Playing in two touring bands (Black Angel's Death
Song and Trash Can School), he was along for the ride at many great shows and events in and around the "grunge" scene.
All the familiar names (Nirvana, Hole) are there along with many more bands you may be unfamiliar with, but whom he hopes you will check out after reading about them. He also hopes you will enjoy reading Niceness in the Nineties.
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 10, 2011

    His pull no punches style of writing mixed in with his energy for the music and era he is writing about shines through in this 200 plus page memoir. Lithium magazine

    Here are excerpts from a recently published review in Blurt Magazine: "Despite the fact that have likely never heard of Jim Miller or his music, there is still something refreshingly compelling about his (almost) rock star memoir. Unlike the slew of rock biographies that seem to be churned out faster than artists record albums nowadays, the book is actually a bit humbling. with Miller admitting that his bands (Black Angel's Death Song and Trash Can School simultaneously) weren't exactly household names outside of L.A. (or even in all the many parts of that city). But as a member of a sometime touring band and a staple at various small L.A. clubs, Miller was part of the LA alternative rock scene (remember when that phrase meant something?), getting close to bands like Jane's Addiction, Hole and L7." "If the book reads a bit like that guy at the end of the bar who goes on and on about how he knew Courtney Love before she married Kurt or that he knew the real Jane from Janes' Addiction, well that's because he IS that guy."

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