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Nicholas Nickleby (Everyman's Library Series)
     

Nicholas Nickleby (Everyman's Library Series)

4.1 30
by Charles Dickens, John Carey (Editor)
 

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Charles Dickens had an understanding of mid-Victorian society second to none, and genius and energy massive enough to make the absurdities and terrors of that society come alive on the page. Nicholas Nickleby, with its episodes of chicanery in finance and education, and the dramatic intensity with which it tells the story of its openhearted young protagonist

Overview

Charles Dickens had an understanding of mid-Victorian society second to none, and genius and energy massive enough to make the absurdities and terrors of that society come alive on the page. Nicholas Nickleby, with its episodes of chicanery in finance and education, and the dramatic intensity with which it tells the story of its openhearted young protagonist and its frightening villain, the magnificently rendered Ralph Nickleby, represents Dickens at his clear-eyed, indignant, and mesmerizing best.
           
When Nicholas Nickleby is left penniless by the death of his father, he appeals to his Uncle Ralph to help him and his mother and sister. But Ralph conceives a violent hatred of the young man, and his schemes of persecution haunt Nicholas through a series of picaresque adventures, including a job as a tutor at a horrific school for unwanted boys run by the cruel Wackford Squeers and a stint as a member of the eccentric Crummles family theater troupe. Without shying away from the grimmer aspects of the world Nicholas encounters on his path to eventual happiness, the story remains one of Dickens’s most high-spirited and exuberant.

This edition reprints the original Everyman preface by G. K. Chesterton and includes thirty-nine illustrations by Phiz.

(Book Jacket Status: Jacketed)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780679423072
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
10/28/1993
Series:
Everyman's Library
Pages:
914
Sales rank:
380,500
Product dimensions:
5.28(w) x 8.26(h) x 1.83(d)
Lexile:
1250L (what's this?)

Meet the Author

Charles Dickens was born in a little house in Landport, Portsea, England, on February 7, 1812. The second of eight children, he grew up in a family frequently beset by financial insecurity. At age eleven, Dickens was taken out of school and sent to work in London backing warehouse, where his job was to paste labels on bottles for six shillings a week. His father John Dickens, was a warmhearted but improvident man. When he was condemned the Marshela Prison for unpaid debts, he unwisely agreed that Charles should stay in lodgings and continue working while the rest of the family joined him in jail. This three-month separation caused Charles much pain; his experiences as a child alone in a huge city–cold, isolated with barely enough to eat–haunted him for the rest of his life.

When the family fortunes improved, Charles went back to school, after which he became an office boy, a freelance reporter and finally an author. With Pickwick Papers (1836-7) he achieved immediate fame; in a few years he was easily the post popular and respected writer of his time. It has been estimated that one out of every ten persons in Victorian England was a Dickens reader. Oliver Twist (1837), Nicholas Nickleby (1838-9) and The Old Curiosity Shop (1840-41) were huge successes. Martin Chuzzlewit (1843-4) was less so, but Dickens followed it with his unforgettable, A Christmas Carol (1843), Bleak House (1852-3), Hard Times (1854) and Little Dorrit (1855-7) reveal his deepening concern for the injustices of British Society. A Tale of Two Cities (1859), Great Expectations (1860-1) and Our Mutual Friend (1864-5) complete his major works.

Dickens's marriage to Catherine Hoggarth produced ten children but ended in separation in 1858. In that year he began a series of exhausting public readings; his health gradually declined. After putting in a full day's work at his home at Gads Hill, Kent on June 8, 1870, Dickens suffered a stroke, and he died the following day.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
February 7, 1812
Date of Death:
June 18, 1870
Place of Birth:
Portsmouth, England
Place of Death:
Gad's Hill, Kent, England
Education:
Home-schooling; attended Dame School at Chatham briefly and Wellington

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Nicholas Nickleby (Everyman's Library Series) 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 30 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Being written early in his career and started before "Oliver Twist" was completed, "Nicholas Nickleby" contains all of the classic Dickens qualities of richly detailed characters and numerous intertwing subplots, yet it seems somewhat rushed in conclusion. Dickens fans will surely recall "Nickleby" with fondness, but it is certainly not the first full length Dickens novel one should read. "David Copperfield" or "Bleak House" are better representations of Dickens at his best.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Some critics complain that Nicholas Nickleby is unsophisticated and melodramatic compared to Dickens' later works. In my opinion they are missing the point - it is melodramatic to be sure, but that is all part of the tounge-in-cheek tone of the work. This is an extremely entertaining novel. Highly recommended!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was fantastic. It was the second book by Dickens that I read, and I thought that it was even better than Oliver Twist. I loved the characters, the plot, and even the ending. However, Nicholas is certainly a flawed hero, but that just makes the story more intriguing. It has a perfect amount of political satire, humor, and tragedy. Wonderful book!!
NellyDT More than 1 year ago
can interest people who don't like to read  
LibraryLadyMB More than 1 year ago
I've noticed in most e-books that there are a lot of typos. I am assuming that the books are scanned and not re-typed, so the scanners must be fallible. The story of Nicholas Nickleby is wonderful, and I am reading it again in order to encounter the man in smalls once more.
NPhillygirlPA More than 1 year ago
I've read it before but I can't seem to get my NOOK to cooperate and let me read it again. :-(
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NOT:( >:( VERY VERY VERY VERY VERY VERY VERY VRRY VERY VERY VERY VRY VERY VERY BAD AND BORING? AND BAD? AND BORING AND BAD. And boring.
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