The Nicomachean Ethics

The Nicomachean Ethics

3.8 32
by Aristotle
     
 

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Nicomachean Ethics focuses on the importance of habitually behaving virtuously and developing a virtuous character. Aristotle emphasized the importance of context to ethical behavior, and the ability of the virtuous person to recognize the best course of action. Aristotle argued that happiness and well being is the goal of life, and that a person's pursuit of such

Overview

Nicomachean Ethics focuses on the importance of habitually behaving virtuously and developing a virtuous character. Aristotle emphasized the importance of context to ethical behavior, and the ability of the virtuous person to recognize the best course of action. Aristotle argued that happiness and well being is the goal of life, and that a person's pursuit of such, rightly conceived, will result in virtuous conduct. "EVERY art and every inquiry, and similarly every action and pursuit, is thought to aim at some good; and for this reason the good has rightly been declared to be that at which all things aim." -Aristotle

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

The Nicomachean Ethics remains the most compelling of all works on the good human life, and readers can now enjoy ready access to it through David Reeve's fluent new translation. Accompanied by illuminating commentary and an exceptionally rich index, the volume is an ideal companion for those aspiring to learn their way around this classic text.--David Sedley, The University of Cambridge

C. D. C. Reeve's masterful new translation of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics will become a classic: it is clear and readable; its interpretive implications are far-reaching; it is philosophically illuminating. Reeve's scholarly notes--with detailed textual cross-references to the rest of Aristotle's works--integrate the ethics with the metaphysics, the politics, and the philosophy of mind. The book is an invaluable resource, useful to students and scholars alike.--Amelie Rorty, Tufts University and Harvard Medical School

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781625582089
Publisher:
Start Publishing LLC
Publication date:
02/04/2013
Sold by:
SIMON & SCHUSTER
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
153
File size:
290 KB

Meet the Author

Sir David Ross (1877-1971) was Provost of Oriel College and Deputy Professor of Moral Philosophy at Oxford. He was General Editor of the complete Oxford Translation of Aristotle.
Lesley Brown is a Fellow and Tutor in Philosophy, Somerville College Oxford.

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Nicomachean Ethics 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 32 reviews.
ChelseaBaines More than 1 year ago
Aristotle lays down the foundations for life and mans purpose. He asserts that the supreme good, or highest goal for man, is happiness. A happiness that consists of a rich and fulfilling life focused on virtuous behavior rather than pleasure. He concludes that man should fulfill his rationality through contemplation and moral education to reach this goal. A major theme in this book is Aristotle's rejection of Plato's Theory of the Forms. He argues that learning should be empirical (derived from what can be experienced and observed) and not based on overcoming reality. Another theme is the criticism of Hedonism (which was the philosophy of the time) which said, "Eat drink and be merry for tomorrow we die." Aristotle argued that true happiness or "eudaimonia" comes from living a full, rich, and virtuous life, not from pleasure. I like how Aristotle confronted Hedonism and previous perceptions of happiness that ignore morality as a means of achieving pleasure. This is still a huge problem in our society, as many people are in search of bodily pleasures and ignore matters of the soul. I like the idea of the Golden Mean, that every virtue in excess or in deficiency can be a vice. I disliked how dry and hard to get through the book was, but it's understandable as much of Aristotle's work include the organization of his thoughts as they are being explained. I also strongly disagreed with his idea of incontinence (or indifference). I consider this a vice which is more than just bad, because although it may simply require passivity and not action, it is still a choice to refuse good when it is in one's power to give it, and this is an evil which is almost unforgivable. I recommend this book to everyone. Although some of the ideas may seem simple to us now that they have been accepted for hundreds of years, they are still remarkably complex for the time that they were written. The ideas about virtue, happiness, friendship, contemplation, and purpose are still relevant and valuable today.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ethics nowadays is so confused and grouped with 'morals' that few consider the difference. Those who do use the argument for Ethics to veer the rest towards their own views and so 'Ethics' as a set of conduct is constantly hijacked by the 'righteous' for their own purposes. It is great we still have Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics to remind us what it is all about. And this new translation is conscise, clear, up-to-date and with plenty of endnotes conferring with other valued translations of the past and current academic debates regarding it. Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics shows us that conduct is a choice only the human animal with our ability to question and to reason can develop into a set of ethics that brings us with equilibrium with ourselves, our community and planet. Making us thus greater than the sum of our individual parts as one gestalt entity, and as part of a community of humans. It shows us our choices ought to be irrespective of fear of a hell or hope of a reward. It is choices we ought to develop into habits, into our ethics for our humanity alone. For the benefit to our interactions with our families, friends, community, society and planet at-large. With this in mind Aristotle proceeds then to clearly delineate, describe and quantify what these particular choices are that we develop normally but that should be actively and conscientiously sought out by us to make us better more wholesome human beings. Because if we are to live one life on this planet and nothing more, we should try and learn to be a positive part in it and of it. Thus become of value to ourselves, our community, our planet. It is always with great interest I seek these arguments and am in my 2nd read of this very rewarding book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Goes to sleep
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Kinda weird my good fiend is spreading umors and gossiping ehind my back the first night i met you i thought you were cool and then you go and do this
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
OMG
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*she walked in*
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Take you to iron mask all results.
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Wakes up
Manirul More than 1 year ago
Lovely...! beautiful.....!.... Just enjoy it.....!
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Does not have the Bekker page #s. Other than that it is okay.
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