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Night Knight
     

Night Knight

by Owen Davey
 
Bedtime becomes an unforgettable k-nightly adventure!

Come on a bedtime adventure with one little knight as he rides through forests to reach his bedroom, battles crocodiles to brush his teeth and climbs the tallest tower to get into bed. This exciting and imaginative bedtime tale is told through Owen Davey's charming and witty words and illustrations —

Overview

Bedtime becomes an unforgettable k-nightly adventure!

Come on a bedtime adventure with one little knight as he rides through forests to reach his bedroom, battles crocodiles to brush his teeth and climbs the tallest tower to get into bed. This exciting and imaginative bedtime tale is told through Owen Davey's charming and witty words and illustrations — making this a perfect k-nightly read for every young adventurer.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Davey debuts with a sleepy boy's "knight-time" routine, complete with toothbrush, shield, and sword. The opening spread presents mirror images of the yawning boy. On the left, he wears pajamas and a colander on his head, and his coat of arms includes an ordinary house. On the right, he wears chain mail and a golden helmet: the house is replaced with a castle. Though the text makes bedtime sound ordinary ("I head down the hallway... and climb the stairs"), the pictures reveal a combination of suburbia and medieval heraldry. The boy rides a unicorn past a (coat rack) tree and up a (staircase) mountain into a halo of sunrays. Alligators and a giant squid splash in his tub, and his bedroom door opens onto a horizon of spectacular turreted castles. Davey's digital illustrations resemble linocuts, and his earthy hues of amber, steely blue, and cream evoke warmth. The knight finally turns out the lights: "Though it has been a great adventure... even a knight needs a good night's sleep." While his quick surrender to sleep may be a touch idealistic, Davey creates a visually striking celebration of the last imaginative hurrah before bedtime. Ages 2–5. (Mar.)
From the Publisher
Davey, a British illustrator, uses a striking palette of ocher, orange and cinnamon in this delightful debut, which recreates the imaginative pre-bedtime rituals of the aspiring titular knight. Simple, sweet and bound to induce sleep.
—The New York Times

Davey creates a visually striking celebration of the last imaginative hurrah before bedtime.
—Publishers Weekly

Every spread of this visually stunning British import is suitable for framing. Hip, stylized, beautifully composed cut-paper collages evoke the rich ornamentation of any self-respecting medieval fantasy, all saturated in a warm palette of deep gold, burgundy, rusts and oranges on what looks like handmade paper...A visual feast for very youngest fans of knights and castles.
—Kirkus Reviews

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
"For a knight like me, going to bed...is a great adventure." On one side of the double page, our yawning young narrator in pajamas and sieve helmet faces his imaginary yawning self on the other side in armor and helmet. He heads "down the hallway..." astride his battle horse across the next double page, then up stairs and into a bath filled with fish and a boat. Still in armor, sword in hand, he evades alligators to brush his teeth. The room he rides to is a castle; he puts his things away in a locked chest. The book must then be turned sideways to see him climb a ladder up the castle to bed. He is still in his helmet when he turns out the lights. But then he is in his pajamas, for "even a knight needs a good night's sleep." The illustrations are produced digitally, primarily in shades of yellows and browns, with accents of blue and white. Objects are stylized for their decorative quality, perhaps to suggest the imaginary world. The cover, with its picture of the youngster in armor has a die cut-out which opens to the front pages where we find the pajama-clad boy wearing the sieve pointing in the direction of the dreamy make-believe. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1—As in his completely wordless Foxly's Feast (Templar, 2010), Davey creates images as timeless as fairy tales to transport children to the enchanted forest of Imagination. Read the narrative of Night Knight aloud and it sounds ever so ordinary: "I head down the hallway…and climb the stairs. Then I have a bath… and brush my teeth. I say good night to Rex… and go to my room. I put away my things…climb into bed… and turn out the lights." But the illustrations tell a far more interesting story. With kinetic folk-art patterns in rich, subtle colors, they show the young narrator as he takes readers through dense forests, up steep mountains, into large squid- and serpent-filled seas, and past a three-headed dragon. Children faced with the humdrum prospect of getting ready for bed need only look at Night Knight to remember that adventure is lurking everywhere… yes, even by the umbrella stand, or behind the toothbrush. This book will be best appreciated one-on-one or in small groups.—Susan Weitz, formerly at Spencer-Van Etten School District, Spencer, NY
Kirkus Reviews
An upside-down colander becomes a knight's helmet and a yawn becomes "ye olde yawn" when a small boy dreamer gets ready for bed. Every spread of this visually stunning British import is suitable for framing. Hip, stylized, beautifully composed cut-paper collages (dubbed "digital media" in the small print) evoke the rich ornamentation of any self-respecting medieval fantasy, all saturated in a warm palette of deep gold, burgundy, rusts and oranges on what looks like handmade paper. The 70-word text itself chronicles the boy's bedtime ritual in the briefest, most perfunctory fashion: "For a knight like me, going to bed… / is a great adventure," the boy begins. The armored knight gallops on horseback past paintings and a hat rack, down the hallway of his family home, which gradually transforms into a wild wood, complete with a fox. His pre-bedtime bath involves navigating the tentacles of a giant squid. (The touchstone to reality is the bathtub plug that doubles as an undersea anchor.) The boy knight brushes his teeth while hopping atop the snapping jaws of crocodiles. When he finally climbs into bed (up a turret, of course!) and turns out the lights, he concludes, "Though it has been a great adventure… / even a knight needs a good night's sleep." A visual feast for very youngest fans of knights and castles. (Picture book. 2-4)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763658380
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
01/31/2012
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
727,909
Product dimensions:
9.10(w) x 10.50(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
2 - 5 Years

Meet the Author

Owen Davey describes his style as contemporary and nostalgic and likes to use a palette of warm, muted colors. His work has been featured in the New York Times and Jamie Oliver's food magazine. Owen has had many knightly adventures of his own where he lives in Bristol, England.

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