Night Prey (Lucas Davenport Series #6) [NOOK Book]

Overview

A savage psychopath is playing cat and mouse with Lucas Davenport. But both killer and detective find themselves at odds with a female investigator who has intensely personal reasons for catching the killer herself-and fast.


From the author of Winter Prey comes a "potent and compelling addition to the (Lucas Davenport) series" (Kirkus Reviews). Deputy Police ...

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Night Prey (Lucas Davenport Series #6)

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Overview

A savage psychopath is playing cat and mouse with Lucas Davenport. But both killer and detective find themselves at odds with a female investigator who has intensely personal reasons for catching the killer herself-and fast.


From the author of Winter Prey comes a "potent and compelling addition to the (Lucas Davenport) series" (Kirkus Reviews). Deputy Police Chief Lucas Davenport returns to face his most brilliantly elusive opponent yet--a master thief-turned-murderer who carves into his victims the initials of a beautiful woman with whom he has become obsessed. LG, Doubleday, and Mystery Guild Selections.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The pseudonymous Sandford (he's Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist John Camp) keeps turning out better and better thrillers. In this sixth entry in his Prey series, streetwise Minneapolis deputy police chief Lucas Davenport is beleaguered by perplexing females. Charged with saving the political life of Rose Marie Roux, the ambitious police chief who has her eye on a Senate seat, he's given the assignment of tracking to ground the sex-crazed perpetrator of a series of murders of young women. Davenport's unwelcome colleague in this case is feminist Meagan Connell, an abrasive State Bureau of Criminal Apprehension investigator who's obsessed with catching the killer before she dies of cancer. Also bedeviled by the ill-timed assignment of a new partner, a yuppie who was formerly assigned to the grade schools as ``Officer Friendly'' and who happens to be the husband of the mayor's niece, Davenport is additionally saddled with the mystifying death of an elderly woman who died rather conveniently, freeing some local hoods to profit from a real-estate scam. Juxtaposing the dark consciousness of the sex-fixated murderer against the narrative perspective of Davenport, Sandford builds a compelling counter-rhythm of suspense. The narrative is sensitively embued with Davenport's humaneness as, in awe, he watches Connell courageously fight to postpone her impending death. Yet, credibly flawed, the cop also displays a roving eye when he's momentarily distracted from his deep commitment to the lovely physician Weather Karkinnen by a beautiful and seductive TV anchor. Literary Guild and Doubleday Book Club main selection; Mystery Guild alternate. (May)
Library Journal
This novel is sixth in the ``Prey'' series, written by journalist John Camp under the Sandford pseudonym and featuring Porsche-driving Minneapolis police detective Lucas Davenport. Here Davenport, who has just returned to duty after recovering from a serious gunshot wound, must face a serial killer named Koop, who is dropping bodies all over the metropolitan area. Koop makes the mistake of becoming a little too obsessed with a potential victim and thus leaves a trail that Davenport and his fellow officers finally discover. Despite its length, Night Prey is a tight, fast-moving thriller with appealing good guys and a suitably evil villain. Especially fascinating among the characters is Policewoman Connell, who is dying of cancer and whose fate becomes linked to Koop's in the spectacular climax. Buy wherever thrillers are read. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 2/15/94.]-A.J. Wright, Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham
Wes Lukowsky
Sandford's sixth "Prey" novel follows the same formula as the first five: sharp-tongued Minneapolis deputy police chief Lucas Davenport is on the trail of a serial killer--this time a particularly nasty specimen with a yen for disemboweling his victims. Meagan Connell, an investigator from a state agency, plays the de rigueur role of Davenport's feisty, determined female assistant. Davenport is also peripherally involved in a case that appears to involve the Seeds, a loosely organized group of white supremacists. The third-person narration takes the reader along with the serial killer as he makes his rounds, choosing and stalking his victims. Alternately, the narrative follows the victims and the investigators. There is no mystery here; the killer's identity is clear from page one. The suspense lies in the investigation. Will Davenport and Connell catch the killer before he gets that one, last, innocent victim? Yes, the plotting seems lifted from dozens of interchangeable slasher flicks, but the dialogue crackles and individual scenes can be almost unbearably suspenseful. This may be the first good suntan book of 1994. A little sunblock, a tall cool one, and a serial killer--ah, summertime.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101146200
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 3/1/1995
  • Series: Lucas Davenport Series , #6
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 448
  • Sales rank: 7,698
  • File size: 878 KB

Meet the Author

"Like the best writers in this genre—Dashiell Hammett, Elmore Leonard, Ed McBain among them—John Sandford evokes his netherworld with authentic dialogue and meticulous details."—Minneapolis Star Tribune

John Sandford is the pseudonym of the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist John Camp. Camp was born in 1944 and was raised in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. He received his B.A. in American Studies from the University of Iowa, and received his first training as a journalist and reporter when he was in Korea for 15 months working for his base paper.



After the army, Camp spent 10 months working for the Cape Girardeau Se Missourian newspaper before returning to the University of Iowa for his Masters in Journalism. From 1971 to 1978, he worked as a general assignment reporter for the Miami Herald, covering killings and drug cases, among other beats, with his colleague, the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Edna Buchanan.



In 1978, Camp joined the St. Paul Pioneer Press as a features reporter. He became a daily columnist at the newspaper in 1980. In the same year, he was named a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for an article he wrote on the Native American communities in Minnesota and North Dakota and their modern day social problems. In 1986, Camp won the Pulitzer Prize for feature writing for a series of articles on the farm crisis in the Midwest.



Camp has written fourteen books in the bestselling "Prey" series under the name John Sandford. The titles in this series, which features Lucas Davenport, include Rules of Prey, Shadow Prey, Eyes of Prey, Silent Prey, Winter Prey, Night Prey, Mind Prey, Sudden Prey, Secret Prey, Certain Prey, Easy Prey, Chosen Prey, Naked Prey, Broken Prey, Invisible Prey, and now, Phantom Prey.

With the "Prey" series, Sandford has displayed a brilliance of characterization and pace that has earned him wide praise and made the books national bestsellers. He has been hailed as a "born storyteller" (San Diego Tribune), his work as "the kind of trimmed-to-the-bone thriller you can't put down" (Chicago Tribune), and Davenport as "one of the most engaging (and iconoclastic) characters in contemporary fiction." (Detroit News)



Biography

John Camp (better known to readers as thrillmeister John Sandford) began his career as a journalist -- first as a crime reporter for The Miami Herald, then as a general reporter, columnist, and features writer for the Saint Paul Pioneer Press & Dispatch. In 1986, he won the Pulitzer Prize for "Life on the Land: An American Farm Family," a five-part series examining the farm crisis in southwest Minnesota.

Camp's interests turned to fiction in the mid-1980s, and he took time off to write two novels which were ultimately accepted for publication: The Fool's Run, a techno-thriller featuring a complex con man known as Kidd, and Rules of Prey, a police procedural starring maverick Minneapolis detective Lucas Davenport. When both books were scheduled (by different publishers) to be released three months apart in 1989, Camp was persuaded to adopt a pseudonym for one. He chose his paternal grandmother's maiden name, "Sandford" for Rules of Prey, and the nom de plume has remained attached to all the books in the series.

Less Dick Tracy than Dirty Harry, hard-boiled, iconoclastic Lucas Davenport is a composite of the cops Camp met while working the crime beat as a reporter. Intelligent and street smart, Davenport is also manipulative and not above bending the rules to get results. And although he has mellowed over time (something of a skirt chaser in his youth, he is now married with children), he remains one of the edgiest and most popular protagonists in detective fiction. Fans keep returning to the Prey books for their intelligently hatched plots, high-octane pacing, and deft, fully human characterizations.

From time to time, Camp strays from his bestselling series for standalone thrillers (The Night Crew, Dead Watch), and in 2007 he introduced a new series hero, Virgil Flowers of the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, who debuted in Dark of the Moon. Although he is no longer a full-time journalist, Camp contributes occasional articles and book reviews to various publications. He is also a passionate archaeologist and has worked at a number of digs, mainly in Israel.

Good To Know

Don't confuse John Sandford with John Sanford -- it's one of Sandford's pet peeves. Sanford (without the "d") is a Christian philosophy writer.

The Sandford pseudonym has caused a few problems for Camp in the past. At an airport once, his ticket was reserved under Sandford, while all of his identification, of course, had the name Camp. Luckily, he had one of his novels with him, and thanks to the book jacket photo, he was able to convince airport security to let him on the plane.

The books in Camp's less successful Kidd series (The Fool's Run, The Empress File, The Devil's Code, and The Hanged Man's Song) have been re-released under the Sandford pseudonym.

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    1. Also Known As:
      John Roswell Camp
    2. Hometown:
      St. Paul, Minnesota
    1. Date of Birth:
      February 23, 1944
    2. Place of Birth:
      Cedar Rapids, Iowa
    1. Education:
      State University of Iowa, Iowa City: B.A., American History; M.A., Journalism
    2. Website:

Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 76 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 76 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2001

    BETTER THAN SOME-WORSE THAN OTEHRS!!

    I have read all the Prey series up to and including this one. I liked Night Prey better than some of the others. One thing I like is Lucus did not fall into bed with nearly everybody he saw in this one. I still feel Winter Prey is the best one I have read so far. In Night Prey, Koop is the killer, you know that from the first page, there is no doubt. The story follows the same format. Lucus and team keep asking questions and following up on leads until they figure out who the killer is. They then set a trap for him which does not go as expected. I was surprised at the ending. I liked it as it was an unusual twist. The characters are good and you can see in your mind what is happening. The bad thing is you know that what is written here can actually happen in everday live. Thats not good.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2014

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    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 13, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    John Sandford has such a gift for writing creepy characters that

    John Sandford has such a gift for writing creepy characters that can be believable and terrifying. Here, in Night Prey, the author gives us another take involving flawed protagonist Lucas Davenport. Davenport’s life is taking turns that he didn’t expect and they case maks it even more unpredictable. The killer’s motivations and actions are eerie and Davenport and his cohorts make logical steps in solving the crimes. Overall, a very good book in a very good series!

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  • Posted April 8, 2012

    Quick Opener. Hard to put down.

    I don't know how Sandford comes up with the characters for his novels but he picked a wild one here. Bring on number seven.

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  • Posted February 27, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Night Prey

    Well, I would definitely recommend all of the Prey novels by John Sanford. I really liked Night Prey. As usual, full of suspense, surprises and lots of grizzly details. I fell in love with Lucas Davenport while reading these books and you will too!

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  • Posted October 3, 2011

    Great story

    All of the Prey series are great reads. Can't miss. Lucas Davenport is terrific.

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  • Posted March 8, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Davenport Rolls On

    I believe this is the 6th book in the Prey series with Lucas Davenport. As with the others leading up to it, Sandford keeps it fast paced throughout and builds all of his characters, including the continual development of Davenport. The story itself has the expected twists and turns, some humor and this particular novel carries with it plenty of brutally violent acts by the killer. Along the way, Davenport encounters side issues on his job and in his life. Makes this escapism type of novels a little more real by recognizing that our day-to-day lives are three dimensional. A great read!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2010

    Another great 'prey' read

    When I read the first book in this Prey series, "Rules of Prey", I knew I wanted to continue to read each one, in order. I am up to #10 and have not been disappointed yet by John Sanford or Lucas Davenport!

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