Night Rabbits

Night Rabbits

by Lee Posey, Michael Montgomery
     
 

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This touching, evocative story of a young girl's special relationship with gentle nighttime creatures will capture the hearts of readers of all ages.

Young Elizabeth treasures the rabbits who dance on the lawn in front of her family's summer cabin. On hot, sleepless nights, she goes out to the hammock on the porch and watches a magical nocturnal scene: gentle

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Overview

This touching, evocative story of a young girl's special relationship with gentle nighttime creatures will capture the hearts of readers of all ages.

Young Elizabeth treasures the rabbits who dance on the lawn in front of her family's summer cabin. On hot, sleepless nights, she goes out to the hammock on the porch and watches a magical nocturnal scene: gentle rabbits frolicking in the grass to a chorus of night sounds. But the rabbits are eating the grass that her father has cared for all summer, and Elizabeth must come up with a solution that both protects the rabbits and helps her father care for the lawn.

Editorial Reviews

Sesame Street Parents
There's a twist to this gentle tale: A child teaches her parent about the wonders of nature. Dad is angry with the rabbits that come out at night and damage the lawn. So the narrator, a young girl, works out a plan: She'll leave some lettuce for the rabbits, and then they won't eat her father's grass. Dad observes her doing this and decides that maybe his family can share the lawn with the rabbits, after all.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Posey sets a contemplative mood in her debut children's book. It's summertime, and Elizabeth and her father are at their cabin. The lawn is her father's pride and joy, and he labors over it for hours, but rabbits are eating the grass at night. Elizabeth loves the rabbits, especially when they leap "soft as shyness" when it's too hot to sleep. Worried that her father will banish them, she devises a plan to keep peace, leaving lettuce for the furry visitors to eat and pitching in to help with the lawn chores. Posey's languid pace feels like an expression of her tranquil setting, and she depicts both the bond between father and daughter and Elizabeth's resourceful solution realistically. She also displays a knack for description--rabbits are "quick as moonbeams," morning is "soft and gray, a picture waiting for the colors to be painted in." Montgomery's (Little Red Riding Hood/The Wolf's Tale) expansive paintings favor the subdued but auspicious lighting of early summer evenings, when time feels distended. His interiors are spare, and details of outdoor vistas are carefully selected--a few stars twinkling above the trees; a pair of dragonflies hovering over the pond; gracefully balanced pine branches framing a view of the yard. Through these well-edited compositions he sustains the story's unhurried, summertime mood. Ages 4-8. (Mar.)
Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
When it is too hot to sleep at night, Elizabeth goes out to the cabin porch to sleep in the hammock. There under the starry sky, she watches the rabbit nibbling the grass. Elizabeth loves the rabbit, but her father sure doesn't. The rabbits are eating up the lawn he has lavished attention on. When she sets out some lettuce to save the lawn, her father smiles and says that the rabbits may still prefer his grass. Together they decided to tend the lawn and share it with their nighttime visitors. The paintings beautifully depict the serenity of a cabin set along the edge of a wood, the warm relationship between father and daughter, the hush of nighttime and the lushness of the lawn reaching down to the meandering creek.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-K-Elizabeth discovers that conflicts with parents can often be resolved more easily than one might think. The child loves to watch the rabbits dance on the lawn on summer evenings, but she is worried that her father will be angry when he discovers that the creatures are eating the grass that he has labored over so long and hard. Perhaps he'll say that the animals must go. She tries offering them an alternative-lettuce-but when her father notices what she is doing, he kindly suggests that the rabbits might still prefer the grass. To her great relief, he is not angry and together they work out a solution. They'll share the lawn work and let the rabbits stay. This is obviously a family that likes order. The large, formal oil paintings show their perfect lawn, their orderly house, and Elizabeth's quiet demeanor. It is a relief to see the tension fade from her face and to see her become playful in the later scenes. This very gentle problem-solving story may be a relief to those who are made uncomfortable by the more strident voices and acting-out behavior shown in titles such as David Shannon's No, David! (Scholastic, 1998) and Jules Feiffer's I Lost My Bear (Morrow, 1998).-Virginia Golodetz, Children's Literature New England, Burlington, VT Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781561451647
Publisher:
Peachtree Publishers, Ltd.
Publication date:
03/28/1999
Edition description:
Illustrate
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.90(w) x 10.40(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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