Night Train to Memphis (Vicky Bliss Series #5) [NOOK Book]

Overview

An assistant curator of Munich's National Museum, Vicky Bliss is no expert on Egypt, but she does have a Ph.D. in solving crimes. So when an intelligence agency offers her a luxury Nile cruise if she'll help solve a murder and stop a heist of Egyptian antiquities, all 5'11" of her takes the plunge. Vicky suspects the authorities really want her to lead them to her missing lover, the art thief and master of disguises she knows only as "Sir John Smythe." And right in the shadow of the Sphinx she spots him. . . with...
See more details below
Night Train to Memphis (Vicky Bliss Series #5)

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$6.99
BN.com price
Marketplace
BN.com

All Available Formats & Editions

Overview

An assistant curator of Munich's National Museum, Vicky Bliss is no expert on Egypt, but she does have a Ph.D. in solving crimes. So when an intelligence agency offers her a luxury Nile cruise if she'll help solve a murder and stop a heist of Egyptian antiquities, all 5'11" of her takes the plunge. Vicky suspects the authorities really want her to lead them to her missing lover, the art thief and master of disguises she knows only as "Sir John Smythe." And right in the shadow of the Sphinx she spots him. . . with his new flame. Vicky is so furious at this romantic stab-in-the-back, not to mention the sudden arrival of her meddling boss, Herr Dr. Schmidt, that she may overlook a danger as old as the pharaohs and as unchanging. . . a criminal who hides behind a mask of charm while moving in for the kill.

When Vicky Bliss, assistant curator of the National Museum in Munich, learns of a plot to rob the treasure-filled Cairo Museum, she joins a cruise up the Nile in order to prevent the crime and identify the thief, master of disguise and her occasional lover, Sir John Smythe. First, she must deal with the fury of seeing Sir John with his new flame.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Comically mixing country music lyrics with Egyptology lore, this fifth Vicky Bliss tale (after Trojan Gold) focuses more on the Munich National Museum's assistant curator's love affair with a British art forger/thief than on suspense. Vicky poses as an Egyptian art expert on a cruise up the Nile in order to help the Munich police spot the leader of an art ring that is planning to rob the Cairo museum. Among those whom she suspects are Feisal, the native guide, a suspicious pair of men named Bright and Sweet, and, alas, her old lover and adversary, Sir John, who is on board with his mother and his new bride. The accomplished Peters's latest quirky, lighthearted novel sports some harrowing moments, as when Vicky, her eccentric boss, Herr Dr. Schmidt, and John attempt to escape from the villainous ring, but with its emphasis on Vicky's love life, the story remains essentially a spirited soap opera interspersed with guidebook descriptions. Author tour. (Sept.)
Library Journal
Using a location and subject familiar to readers of her historical fiction series featuring 19th-century archaeologist Amelia Peabody, Peters combines ancient wonders with modern calamity. Dr. Vicky Bliss (Borrower of the Night, Chivers North American Pr., 1992), who works for the National Museum in Munich, joins a luxurious Nile cruise in order to forestall an alleged plot to rob the Cairo Museum. The ship and its 30 passengers compare most favorably to other such microcosms, especially in view of Vicky's witty sarcasm, fevered conjecture, and stubborn bravery. Brisk adventure in exotic surroundings from a practiced hand; heartily endorsed.
Emily Melton
Peters' fans will be delighted with her newest mystery. The talented, popular author offers a clever plot combined with an exotic setting, well-crafted writing, wryly funny humor, interesting factoids about Egyptian antiquities, and lively, attractive heroine Vicky Bliss, who can hold her own against the meanest meanies. Vicky, a curator at Munich's National Museum, is asked to go undercover on a cruise down the Nile. Her mission: to spot who among her fellow passengers might be the master criminal about to carry out a major theft of valuable antiquities. Vicky has a sneaking suspicion that the thief the police are after is the mysterious man she knows as John, who's perfectly capable of illegal activities and who's been both her sworn enemy and her sometime lover. When John shows up on the cruise and a crew member is murdered, Vicky begins to fear her suspicions were correct--but she doesn't have enough evidence to rule out the other passengers. This one is vintage Peters at her entertaining best--a top choice for all mystery collections.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781455552641
  • Publisher: Grand Central Publishing
  • Publication date: 8/6/2013
  • Series: Vicky Bliss Series , #5
  • Sold by: Hachette Digital, Inc.
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 63,024
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Elizabeth Peters
Elizabeth Peters was born and brough up in Illinois and earned her Ph.D. in Egyptology from the University of Chicago's famed Oriental Institute. Peters was named Grand Master at the inaugural Anthony Awards in 1986 and Grand Master by the Mystery Writers of America in 1998. In 2003, she received the Lifetime Achievement Award at the Malice Domestic Convention. She is also the author, as Barbara Mertz, of Temples, Tombs, and Hieroglyphs: A Popular History of Ancient Egypt and Red Land, Black Land: Daily Life in Ancient Egypt. She lives in western Maryland. Visit her website at: ameliapeabody.com.

Biography

Neither the Great Depression nor the lack of a public library in her small hometown of Canton, Illinois, deterred Barbara Mertz (the future Elizabeth Peters) from becoming an avid reader. Yet, when her family moved to a suburb of Chicago, she was elated to discover the riches contained in the town's local library and proceeded to devour every book she could get her hands on. She began writing in high school; but by that time she had already decided to become an archaeologist.

Mertz received a scholarship to the University of Chicago, which boasted a world-famous Egyptology department. Her mother, an eminently practical soul, encouraged her daughter to become a teacher; but after taking only two education courses, Mertz knew a career in the classroom was not for her. Determined to follow her dream, she moved over to the university's Oriental Institute, and received her Ph.D. in Egyptology at the age of 23.

The post-WWII job market wasn't kind to women in general, much less to women seeking careers in archaeology. Mertz married and began a family, but never lost sight of her life's ambition. While she was raising her two children, she decided to try her hand at writing. Her first few attempts were never published, but they did land her an agent; and in 1964 she published her first book, Temples, Tombs and Hieroglyphs: A Popular History of Ancient Egypt.

Mertz authored two additional works on archaeology before foraying into fiction in 1966. The Master of Blacktower is the first of several gothic suspense novels written under the pseudonym Barbara Michaels. (In her biography, she explains that the use of pseudonyms helps readers to distinguish various types of books written by a single author.) The supernatural elements in the thrillers penned under the Michaels name have kept readers on the edge of their seats for decades.

In the 1970s, Mertz began writing under her second, more famous pseudonym, Elizabeth Peters. As Peters, she has authored books in three different series. Beginning in 1972 with The Seventh Sinner (1972), the first series features a glamorous librarian-turned-romance novelist named Jacqueline Kirby (the final Jacqueline Kirby mystery, Naked Once More, won a coveted Agatha Award in 1989). The second series, starring American art historian Vicky Bliss, debuted in 1973 with Borrower of the Night (Vicky's last outing was 2008's Laughter of Dead Kings). Then, in 1975, Peters introduced her most famous protagonist, archeologist/sleuth Amelia Peabody, in a dandy adventure entitled Crocodile on the Sandbank.

From the first, readers loved Amelia, a plucky Victorian feminist who—together with her husband, the distinguished Egyptologist Radcliffe Emerston—has gone on to solve countless mysteries in the Middle East. Peabody fans received an extra treat in 2003 with Amelia Peabody's Egypt: A Compendium to Her Journals, a nonfiction stroll through ancient Egypt that included nearly 600 photographs and illustrations, plus expert academic articles.

In addition to her three series, Mertz has written several standalone suspense novels as Elizabeth Peters. She has this to say about her successful, prolific career: "The craft of writing delights me. It is impossible to attain perfection; there is always something more to be learned—figuring out new techniques of plotting or characterization, struggling with recalcitrant sentences until I force them to approximate my meaning. And nothing is ever wasted. Everything one sees and hears, everything one learns, can be used."

Good To Know

The pseudonym Elizabeth Peters is taken from her two children, Elizabeth and Peter. She uses three pseudonyms so readers can tell the difference between the three types of books she writes: nonfiction archaeology as Barbara Mertz, supernatural thrillers as Barbara Michaels and historical mysteries as Peters. For the record, Mertz has called the pseudonyms "a horrible nuisance."
Read More Show Less
    1. Also Known As:
      Barbara Mertz, Barbara Michaels
    2. Hometown:
      A farm in rural Maryland
    1. Date of Birth:
      September 29, 1927
    2. Place of Birth:
      Canton, Illinois
    1. Date of Death:
      August 8, 2013

Table of Contents

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 16 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(10)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 16 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 13, 2012

    I love the Vicky Bliss series. Whenever I need a light yet enter

    I love the Vicky Bliss series. Whenever I need a light yet entertaining read, I turn to this series. There aren't many books out there that I can read over and over again, but the characters in this series are well crafted and the story has just the right amount of action, mystery and one of those so wrong, but oh so right love interests. The balance of history, mystery and comedy are just right. I just wish this one available for Nook. all the others in the series are.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2014

    GUMNASIUM

    A huge gym with obstacle courses and everything you can imagine that a gym has

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 23, 2013

    Really great !

    Well-written and very action-packed. Funny and yet intriguing.

    Would recommend it to all who love mysteries.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 7, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Night Train To Memphis is classic Elizabeth Peters, with its el

    Night Train To Memphis is classic Elizabeth Peters, with its elegant and literate narrative, and a slightly old-fashioned feel due to the complete lack of current pop culture references (the musical references are classical and American folk and bluegrass) and rather stodgy assortment of characters who all behave in a rather formal manner. But these factors create a cozy bubble of a setting, one that is timeless, refined and classic. I feel like I should be sipping tea or a glass of wine while reading.
    Vicky is an interesting character, in that she can be rather unsympathetic. She is aloof, and quite critical of her fellow passengers, even her friend and boss, Schmidt, who is as good-natured as they come. All characteristics she shares with her lover John, whose arrogance and perpetual demeanor of amused contempt make him quite unlikeable as well. Interesting for the heroine of a book.

    Soon Vicky learns of the murder of her porter, Ali, right after somebody tries to bean her with a flowerpot.
    As the cruise carries on, Vicky gets to know the passengers better and realizes the danger she's in as she figures out that John is either involved with some really bad partners, or there's another element at play. Either way she's targeted and vulnerable, and doesn't know who she can trust. Her former lover John is behaving cruelly and oddly towards her and his new young wife, and nothing is going as planned.
    Soon the cheerful Schmidt shows up, but is blessedly in the dark about the dangerous situation, and Vicky's stress increases as she worries about getting him out of the situation.

    As the players and the plot are revealed, the novel turns into a desperate race of survival as the identity of enemies and allies become clear. Truly an exciting second half! The mystery of the complicated plot was solved, and the characters became much more compelling as their true motives were revealed.

    Although this is the fifth book in this series, I had no trouble reading it as a standalone novel. The author made discreet but frequent references to Vicky and John's history and I never felt lost.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 23, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    A great mystery writer.

    Her books are compelling and they keep my attention. You won't be disappointed. Addition to being a great mystery book, it has a wonderful lobe story. I keep reading her books.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Night Train review

    This book didn't seem as good as her other Vicky Bliss series. It seemed like the main character, Vicky, didn't know what was going on or what to do a lot of the time. I still liked it though, but not as well as past books I have read in this series. I always enjoy Elizabeth Peters' (Barbara Mertz)writing.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2004

    I absolutley loved this whole series

    This book was a wonderful book that I truly enjoyed. It truly kept one wanting more and is a must read for all!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2002

    great performance

    This is one book I can listen to over and over again, because of the lively and entertaining performance of Kathleen Turner. She handles a variety of quirky personalities with ease, from an elderly German museum director, a sexy young Egyptian man, and a cynical English art forger, to the somewhat manic Vicky Bliss. This book is *reasonably * non-violent enough for a kid to listen to; my child really liked it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2000

    The abridged version would be better

    Far too many cliches, clever remarks. By the end of the third chapter, I was sick of 'like a' phrases. One can lose track of the story - which is already choppy. This books has everything but the kitchen sink, including some screwed up sequence of events. Just a tad short of Bulwar-Lytton award.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 6, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 3, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 30, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 16 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)