Nightfall

Nightfall

3.6 15
by Isaac Asimov, Robert Silverberg
     
 

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These two renowned writers have invented a world not unlike our own—a world on the edge of chaos, torn between the madness of religious fanaticism and the stubborn denial of scientists. Only a handful of people on the planet Lagash are prepared to face the truth—that their six suns are setting all at once for the first time in 2,000 years, signaling the

Overview

These two renowned writers have invented a world not unlike our own—a world on the edge of chaos, torn between the madness of religious fanaticism and the stubborn denial of scientists. Only a handful of people on the planet Lagash are prepared to face the truth—that their six suns are setting all at once for the first time in 2,000 years, signaling the end of civilization!

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This collaboration by two masters of the genre expands on Asimov's classic short story first published in 1941. Kalgash is a planet with six suns, a world where darkness is unnatural. Scientists realize that an eclipse--an event that occurs only every 2049 years--is imminent, and that a society completely unfamiliar with darkness will be plunged into madness and chaos. The novel traces events leading to this discovery, and the fates of the main characters immediately following the apocalypse. While the premise is convincing in the context of a short story, this longer version brings up too many unresolved questions. The original tale was tightly written, succinct and stunning, but the novelization seems flabby and drawn-out--the reader recognizes the significance and consequences of the impending events long before the characters do. An abrupt and simplistic ending further mars a hallowed SF tale. 100,000 first printing. (Nov.)
Library Journal
Science and religion form an uneasy and fractious alliance on the planet Kalgash when a group of astronomers and a cult of religious fanatics predict the inevitable coming of darkness to a world that has never known night. Based on Asimov's short story ``Nightfall,'' this joint venture by two of sf's most revered veterans focuses less on characterization than on the exploration of the human psyche's ability to cope with the imminent destruction of civilization. Recommended.
School Library Journal
YA-- Because of its six suns, the planet Kalgash is bathed in perpetual sunlight. However, once every 2,049 years all six suns are eclipsed, plunging the planet into total darkness and causing widespread madness that results in the civilization's complete destruction, thus allowing the cycle to begin again. Night fall , expanded from Asimov's 1941 award-winning short story, lets readers experience the cataclysmic event through the eyes and biases of a newspaperman, an astronomer, an archaeologist, a psychologist, and a religious fanatic. This novel improves upon the original through the use of better developed characters and an expanded, more textured story that results in an absorbing, richer tale.-- John Lawson, Fairfax County Public Library, Fairfax, VA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780553290998
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
08/28/1991
Series:
Bantam Spectra Book Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
352
Sales rank:
149,920
Product dimensions:
4.20(w) x 6.88(h) x 0.90(d)
Age Range:
11 - 15 Years

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Nightfall 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 15 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Entertaining and realistic - believable - but be sure to think ! The first version of nightfall was penned by isaac aaimov in 1941; So bear in mind that he was jewish & was understandably distressed by what was happening in the name of religion. The expanded bersion by asimov with silverberg was published in 1970;at the "god is dead" era of rising environmentalism, anti-war demknstrations etc. Thus it's understandable that the main conflict is beyween science and religion, over which will influence the fate of the population more - and SHOULD that be so. Sadly for the people of that planet, tho compromise was possible it wasn't reached. Both sides had valid approaches to problem-solving but insisted on complete control. It is possible to have an orderly society that allows freedom of thought. I suggest the reader consider how we can aim for this in our times.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Imagine a distant, Earthlike planet in a solar system with six suns. This is the planet Kalgash, where the people don't know what nighttime is except in fables and bad dreams. Little do they suspect what will happend when a heavenly eclipse changes their world forever. This book was fun and fascinating. It has a storyline about unique relationsihips, not only between the characters but also between the scientific and religious communities on the fictional world of Kalgash. My only disappointment was that one of the characters I grew to like gets killed in the latter pages. I would encourage anyone who enjoys Science Fiction to check out this excellent work.
Guest More than 1 year ago
He is far and away my favorite author. His story Nightfall is great. Although it doesn't deal with any of the topics of his famous Foundation and Robot series, it is a very well-written book (originally a short story). READ THIS BOOK!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read the orginial Nightfall years ago and really liked it but did not care so much for this version. I guess there were just so many repeated words with each character. Seemed like unnecessary info.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I havent bought the book becuase i all ready own it and it is an amazing book that is filled with breathtaking moments and makes realize how tribling it is for the charcters to have no sunlight on a world where it id always bright and never dark.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm mostly a fan of feminist literature, so sci fi is not my area of expertise at all! However, Nightfall raises REALLY interesting philosophical questions - puzzling, tricky, intriguing. How does the knowledge of potential life on other planets, and the knowledge of how vast our universe is, affect our own day-to-day reality? On earth, we seem numb to it. We see thousands of stars every night, and don't freak out, don't even really pause to marvel at it. But what if we only saw the stars once in a thousand years? What if we suddenly realized, in a momentous epiphany, how small we really are, how high the possibility of life on other planets yet how unattainable complete certainty of this really is? These questions are raised in Nightfall. I remember it more for the interesting, maddening questions it raises than for the characters or plot, although these are quite amusing as well.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Psychiatry and psychology are evil scams run by greedy for revenge .