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Nightmare Factory
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Nightmare Factory

4.0 7
by Thomas Ligotti, Colleen Doran (Illustrator), Joe Harris, Stuart Moore, Heidi Macdonald (Editor)
 

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"A fractured mind is often the way into a world not suspected by those of an innocent normality."

Enter the universe of renowned horror master Thomas Ligotti—a universe where clowns take part in a sinister winter festival, a scheming girlfriend makes reality itself come unraveled, a crumbling asylum's destruction unleashes a

Overview

"A fractured mind is often the way into a world not suspected by those of an innocent normality."

Enter the universe of renowned horror master Thomas Ligotti—a universe where clowns take part in a sinister winter festival, a scheming girlfriend makes reality itself come unraveled, a crumbling asylum's destruction unleashes a greater horror, and a mysterious Teatro comes and goes, leaving only shattered dreams in its wake.

In the tradition of Edgar Allan Poe and H. P. Lovecraft, Ligotti's sophisticated tales of terror take us to places few would suspect exist, where madness is only a thought away. The Nightmare Factory adapts four of Ligotti's most chilling tales into fine graphic literature by famed writers and artists Stuart Moore, Joe Harris, Colleen Doran (The Sandman), Ben Templesmith (30 Days of Night), Ted McKeever (Batman), and Michael Gaydos (Alias). Featuring all-new introductions to each story by Thomas Ligotti.

Editorial Reviews

Rue Morgue
“The Nightmare Factory lives up to its title, cleverly manufacturing disturbing dreams for discerning horror comic readers.”
Contra Costa Times
“Original and toys in macabre fashion with our nerves. Classy, evocative artwork.”
Washington Post
“Moody art and ominous pacing create an air of creeping mystery that suits Ligotti’s macabre tales.”
Bookslut.com
Top 12 Graphic Novels of the Year recipient
San Jose Mercury News
“Each story is original and toys in macabre fashion with our nerves. Classy, evocative artwork, too.”
A.V. Club.com (The Onion)
“Beautifully, queasily rendered.”
Fangoria.com
“Worth a visit...the artwork alone warrants a look.”
City Link (Florida)
“A fine, creepy read.”
Comics Buyer’s Guide
“Templesmith’s art posses the power to spread fear all by itself...and Doran, McKeever, and Gaydos do a splendid job.”
Rain Taxi
“Devotees will appreciate the visual interpretations of his [Ligott’s] work, and newcomers will find the book an accessible introduction to a genuinely unsettling dreamscape.”
Ain't it Cool News.com
“[E]ntertaining from start to finish...These tales of terror exude waves of paranoia and pathos from every page.”
Fearzone.com
“Outstanding...moody and deeply disturbing...each of these four stories will elicit a deep visceral response in the reader.”
CountGore.com
“[A] resplendent and disturbing graphic novel adaptation...More than a graphic novel, this is an event! Don’t miss it!”
Thick Online.com
“If you’re into horror stories, than I’d strongly suggest checking out THE NIGHTMARE FACTORY.”
EW.com (Entertainment Weekly)
“Deliciously bleak. B+”
Myjoblo.com
“I’d recommend picking THE NIGHTMARE FACTORY up and giving it a whirl.”
Boston Globe
“Provides a bitterly entertaining treat for those attuned to its storyteller’s grim sentiments.”
Comics Buyer's Guide
"Templesmith’s art posses the power to spread fear all by itself...and Doran, McKeever, and Gaydos do a splendid job."
(Entertainment Weekly) - EW.com
"Deliciously bleak. B+"
(The Onion) - A.V. Club.com
"Beautifully, queasily rendered."
Comics Buyer’s Guide
“Templesmith’s art posses the power to spread fear all by itself...and Doran, McKeever, and Gaydos do a splendid job.”
Library Journal

These four tales are adapted from a much longer 1996 prose collection of the same title by Ligotti, known for "philosophical horror," but perhaps "existential horror" better describes how he evokes the human condition when confronted with death. In "The Last Feast of Harlequin," an anthropologist drops in on a local clown festival to discover an underground coven of sluggish humans who metamorphose into voracious, wormlike creatures. In "Dream of a Mannikin," two psychotherapists duel covertly over a patient who dreams of animated and threatening store-window mannequins, but questions dangle: Who's dreaming, and who's the mannequin? In "Dr. Locrian's Asylum," the demolition of an abandoned asylum awakens more than bad memories: the tormented inmates' specters lurk in upper windows all over town. In "Teatro Grottesco," a mysterious group secretly destroys artists. Ligotti's plots provide no explanations, redemptions, or tidy endings. Rather, as with H.P. Lovecraft, the epiphanies reveal forces of disorder in a world where the only rebirth is into the dying of the light and endless dread. The adaptations maintain the lyrical psychomania of Ligotti's prose, while the skillful art subtly, or not so subtly, pulls out the creepiness of the premises and plots. With occasional nudity and complex themes, this is best for adult collections.
—Martha Cornog

School Library Journal

Gr 10 Up
"While belief in the supernatural is only superstition, the sense of the supernatural cannot be denied," says Thomas Ligotti in one of the four new introductions written for this book. It is comprised of four stories based on his writings, and each is adapted and illustrated by a different team of writers and artists. First up is "The Feast of Harlequin," in which Moore tells of a clown-loving anthropologist investigating a mysterious winter solstice festival that features clowns. In "Dream of a Mannikin," he chronicles the descent into madness of one of a pair of psychoanalyst lovers. Harris adapted the last two stories, "Dr. Locrian's Asylum," which deals with the supernatural manifestations of an insane asylum's horrors becoming loosed on the town that housed it, and "Teatro Grottesco," also the name of a hush-hush organization known only to the underground artists it preys on, robbing them of their artistic genius. The eerie tales are reminiscent of Lovecraft or Kafka; all have disquieting echoes of horror. The artwork is varied and compelling, and the writing is good and true to the source. Ligotti's introductions add to the understanding of the stories. Because of some nudity and (obviously) disturbing situations, this is best for mature teens.
—Dana Cobern-KullmanCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Kirkus Reviews
A large and generally very impressive gathering of imaginative and stylish horror fiction, adding several new stories to those culled from Ligotti's previous collections Songs of a Dead Dreamer (1990), Grimscribe (1991), and Noctuary (1993). Poe and Lovecraft are the obvious influences in these richly atmospheric (and often funny) tales of introversion blossoming into obsession, and of antiquarian scholars unwisely uncovering things that really ought to have been buried. Ligotti's prefatory essay on "The Consolations of Horror" broods wittily about the kind of person who enjoys this sort of thing, advising helpfully that, in reading such material, "for a little while we can pretend to stare the very worst right in the rotting face." Of the new stories, "Teatro Grottesco" and "Severini" portray with perhaps excessive flamboyance the neurotic sources and feverish aftermath of artistic creation. Both "The Clown Puppet," whose absurdly menacing title figure memorably objectifies its narrator's "nonsensical" existence, and "The Red Tower," about an abandoned factory whose unspeakable products are surreptitiously still being sent out into the unsuspecting world, show Ligotti doing what he does best: Turning the abstract matter of our unguarded dreaming moments into vivid and compelling nightmares.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061243530
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
09/04/2007
Pages:
112
Product dimensions:
6.68(w) x 10.30(h) x 0.25(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

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Nightmare Factory 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
i thought it was gunna be really cool but each page my hope for tht became less. the only reason i rated it 2 stars was because the 4th story on there was good.
tonalized More than 1 year ago
So I ordered this graphic novel under the assumption that it was Thomas Ligotti's short story collection for which he won the Bram Stoker award. When it arrived I was a little disappointed. Anyway, after receiving a copy of the actual short story book, it was great to have an illustrated version of the 4 stories to read after reading the original version. I enjoyed it so much that I have ordered the 2nd graphic novel in order to do the same. This is much fun for any fans of Thomas Ligotti
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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harstan More than 1 year ago
¿The Last Feast of Harlequin¿ by Stuart Moore (writer) and Colleen Doran (art). The anthropologist hid behind the clown¿s mask to attend pre-Lenten rituals and festivals. At a winter carnival in Miracaw he will witness and participate in sacrifice to wormy beasts that would give Lovecraft nightmares. ¿Dream of a Mannikin¿ by Stuart Moore (writer) and Ben Templesmith (art). At her first visit to the psychiatrist, Amy Locher tells him about her nightmare that brings the doc into her horrific ¿realm¿. ¿Doctor Locrian¿s Asylum¿ by Joe Harris (writer) and Ted McKeever (art). The Shire County Asylum looms over everything in the town though it has been closed for years. Everyone remains haunted by the largest gloomiest edifice not just due to its ghastly shape and size friends and family spent time there and though shut some might still stalk its halls. 'Teatro Grottesco' by Joe Harris (writer) and Michael Gaydos (art). No one knows exactly why or when the Teatro Grottesco will show up in a town although there is a link to underground artists disconnected with the locals. However, when this theater of the absurd arrives, it sucks away the inspirations and aspirations of artists before continuing its macabre tour. These four Thomas Ligotti¿s tales are converted into graphic comics that do justice to the horror writer, who provides introductions to each. The obvious link to Lovecraft is throughout each work, but fans will recognize Mr. Ligotti has his own spin to the Lovecraftian tale. The art by four different artists is well done, but there are distinct differences in style, which add freshness to the overall book. However, in the end it is the adaptations by Stuart Moore and Joe Harris that pay home to Mr. Ligotti. Harriet Klausner
Guest More than 1 year ago
Suddenly to fall into this nothingness, this unreal realm of delight and horror is to be pressed against the ultimate void, to find the emptiness at the heart of existence, to feel the dark laughter of the gods rise up from the foreworld and begin to enfold us with the black ribbons of their fantastic nightmares. Ligotti has been for me a guide into the the terrible beauty that is this existence. He explores fragmented moments of solitude that brings each solitaire closer to the dark gnosis of a disquietude filled with broken memories and alien visions. He absolves us of the burden of thought by freeing it into the broken dreams of our waking chaos. To read Ligotti is to enter the interstices of a collasped mind caught in the net of the unreal that has as Yeat's once put it: "broken bitter furies on the marble floor... ". Maybe one should say: Ligotti's stories lead us deeper into the realms of the Unreal, tempting us into the furthest reaches of the deepest abyss. Ligotti has learned from his dark father, Emerson, that there is only this moment between the real and the unreal: "I and the Abyss.."