Nightrise (Philip Dryden Series #6)

Nightrise (Philip Dryden Series #6)

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by Jim Kelly
     
 

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Journalist Philip Dryden is shocked to be informed by police that his father has been killed in a car accident – he drowned during the fenland floods of 1977, 35 years before. At the same time, two unrelated cases are demanding Dryden’s professional attention: a body riddled with bullets found hanging in the middle of a lettuce field, and a couple

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Overview

Journalist Philip Dryden is shocked to be informed by police that his father has been killed in a car accident – he drowned during the fenland floods of 1977, 35 years before. At the same time, two unrelated cases are demanding Dryden’s professional attention: a body riddled with bullets found hanging in the middle of a lettuce field, and a couple protesting that the local council has buried their baby daughter in a pauper’s grave without permission. As Dryden pieces the clues together, he realizes that the three cases may be related after all . . .

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Near the outset of Kelly’s elegantly plotted sixth mystery set in Ely, England (after 2008’s The Skeleton Man), journalist Philip Dryden receives a shock. After Dryden’s paper, The Crow, carries a single paragraph about a fiery auto accident with one unidentified victim, his friend Det. Sgt. Stan Cherry informs him that the man has been identified as his father, John Dryden, previously believed lost during flooding in 1977. Awaiting definitive DNA results, Dryden sets off to find more information about the father he barely knew. Two other incidents capture Dryden’s attention: the murder of a man found hanging from an irrigation gantry and riddled with bullets, and the loss of a child’s body intended for burial. Dryden discovers surprising links between these separate events, placing himself and his family in danger. Kelly makes superb use of Fens geography and history in an entry that should give new life to the Philip Dryden series. Agent: Faith Evans, Faith Evans Associates. (Feb.)
Library Journal
In journalist Phillip Dryden's sixth outing (after 2007's The Skeleton Man), he works to find ties between two seemingly unrelated cases: a possible gang killing and a baby burial gone wrong. A third twist comes when the police inform Phillip that his father was killed in a car accident—except his father drowned 35 years ago.
Kirkus Reviews
Cambridgeshire reporter Philip Dryden (The Skeleton Man, 2008, etc.) returns to solve the mystery of his father's death--an especially challenging case, considering that the old man apparently died twice. Jack Dryden was swept away while making a gallant, futile attempt to protect the city of Ely from the calamitous floods of 1977. So how is it that his body's just been discovered burned to death in a car accident? The corpse's fiery fate would make exact identification difficult even for people who'd seen Jack in the past 30 years. But the general description and the dental work both confirm what his identification papers assert: He's Jack Dryden. His son, consumed with skepticism and curiosity, would love to devote every waking moment to solving the mystery. But his attention is claimed by two other problems: the death of Fen Rivers Water Authority bailiff Rory Setchey, who seems to have been hung from a gantry, already dead, and then shot several times, and the West Fen District Council's refusal to release the body of Aque, the infant daughter of David and Gillian Yoruba, to her heartbroken parents. Since David is facing deportation to Niger and Dryden has just become a father himself, he feels especially close to the grieving parents. He can't imagine that his three cases will turn out to be connected by a long-standing conspiracy as simple and clever as it is monstrous. Even if they never came up with such a diabolical plot, long-winded colleagues could well take example from the generosity and economy with which Kelly (Death's Door, 2012, etc.) spins his web.
Booklist Starred Review
"A not-to-be-missed book, both for the gripping story and for Kelly’s expressive, engaging writing style"
From the Publisher
" A not-to-be-missed book, both for the gripping story and for Kelly’s expressive, engaging writing style."
Booklist Starred Review 

Even if they never came up with such a diabolical plot, long-winded colleagues could well take example from the generosity and economy with which Kelly (Death’s Door, 2012, etc.) spins his web
Kirkus Reviews

“Kelly makes superb use of Fens geography and history in an entry that should give new life to the Philip Dryden series.”
Publishers Weekly

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781780290331
Publisher:
Severn House Publishers
Publication date:
01/01/2013
Series:
Philip Dryden Series, #6
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
5.80(w) x 8.60(h) x 1.10(d)

Meet the Author

A previous Dagger in the Library winner, Jim Kelly is the author of four Peter Shaw crime novels and five previous novels in the Philip Dryden series. He lives in Ely, Cambridgeshire.

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Nightrise 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
gloriafeit More than 1 year ago
This was a book that I enjoyed immensely, despite the fact that at times it moved rather slowly for me, probably because many of its frames of reference were unfamiliar, coming as I am from the “other side of the pond.” Even extending to the title, although I supposed it was meant to evoke the opposite of sunrise, and is defined by the author at one point as the moment when one sees “the first star clear in the sky.” Philip Dryden had been a Fleet Street reporter, a job he’d left for one on the local paper to be near his wife. I found him to be a very original protagonist, one made very human and vulnerable when, on the opening page, he is introduced to the reader as the father of an infant son, following somewhat traumatic circumstances: His wife “had been badly injured in a car accident a decade earlier - - trapped in a coma for more than two years. She would never completely recover. They’d been told a child was impossible.” But, almost miraculously, here he was. Also in the opening pages, Philip is told by the police that his father has just been killed in an auto accident, the body burned beyond recognition, only the vehicle itself providing the identity of the owner. This is a second near-impossibility: His father had died 35 years before, drowned during the floods of 1977, the body swept away and never found. The thought that he might have survived and simply chosen not to return to his family is, to say the least, stunning. There are other story lines here, and a faint suspicion allowed that somehow they may be linked.. A West African man, seeking asylum in England but being forced to return to Niger; has been refused, without explanation, the return of the body of his infant daughter, buried, he is told, in an unmarked grave, and he and his wife seek Dryden’s help. Then there is the mystery behind the murder of a local man whose already dead body had been hung from an irrigator in an open field. When another murder occurs, a very personal one for Dryden, his efforts to solve these crimes are redoubled. The novel is very well-written, suspenseful, and with a totally unexpected ending. This is the sixth book in the series, but the first one I’d read. I was happy to discover it, and shall definitely look for the previous entries. This one is certainly recommended.