Nineteenth-Century Media And The Construction Of Identities

Overview

This collection of important new research in 19th-century media history represents some salient, recent developments in the field. Taking as its theme, the ways the media serves to define identities—national, ethnic, professional, gender, and textual, the volume addresses serials in the UK, the US, and Australia. High culture rubs shoulders with the popular press, text with image, feminist periodicals and masculine, gay, and domestic serials. Theory and history combine in ...

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Overview

This collection of important new research in 19th-century media history represents some salient, recent developments in the field. Taking as its theme, the ways the media serves to define identities—national, ethnic, professional, gender, and textual, the volume addresses serials in the UK, the US, and Australia. High culture rubs shoulders with the popular press, text with image, feminist periodicals and masculine, gay, and domestic serials. Theory and history combine in research by scholars of international repute.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"...it will nevertheless fully earn its place on the shelves of all those interested in nineteenth century media."—Graham Law, Victorian Studies
"...an example of scholarship at its best...this book tells us things we didn't already know and makes us think again about the things we thought we did know."—SHARP News
"...students in courses ranging from gender studies to Victorian literature and history will find much to enlighten them..."—Review
Booknews
Presents new research in 19th-century media history, examining the way the media serve to define national, ethnic, professional, and gender identities. Investigates serial journals in the UK, France, the US, and Australia during the period, encompassing annuals, dailies, street ballads, and the penny press. Journalists and authors considered include Charles Dickens, Harriet Martineau, Margaret Oliphant, and Anthony Trollope. Some topics include annuals and cultural democracy, the formation of an Anglo-Jewish literary identity, and reportage of the Irish famine. Brake teaches literature at Birkbeck College, UK. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312232153
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
  • Publication date: 1/6/2001
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 404
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 1.06 (d)

Meet the Author

Laurel Brake is Senior Lecturer in Literature at Birkbeck College, University of London.

Bill Bell is Senior Lecturer and Director of Studies at the University of Edinburgh.

David Finkelstein is co-director of the Scottish Centre for the Book, Napier University, Edinburgh.

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Table of Contents

Part I: Discourses of Jourbanalism
• Editorial Identity and Textual Interaction inTit-Bits —Kate Jackson
• Intimacy and Abstraction in the Rhetoric of the New Jourbanalism—Richard Salmon
• Jourbanalistic Discourses and Constructions of Modern Knowledge—Kate Campbell
• Annuals and Cultural Democracy—Margaret Linley
Part II: The Reader in Text and Image
• Education of the Gaze and The London Jourbanal —Andrew King
• From Street Ballad to Penny Magazine—Michael Hancher
• Popular Periodicals and the "March of Intellect" in the 1820s and 1830s—Brian E. Maidment
• Reading the Correspondence Columns in Woman 1890-1910—Lynne Warren
Part III: Writers/Authors/Jourbanalists
• Dickens as Serial Author—Robert L. Patten
• Authorship, Gender and Power in Victorian Culture—Alexis Easley
• Margaret Oliphant's Jourbanalism—Joanne Shattock
• Israel Zangwill's Early Jourbanalism and the Formation of an Anglo-Jewish Literary Identity—Meri-Jane Rochelson
Part IV: Negotiating Gender
• America's First Feminist Magazine—Amy Beth Aronson
• The British Newspaper Press and the Divorce Court—Anne Humphreys
Saint Paul's Magazine and the Project of Masculinity—Mark W. Turbaner
• Defining the Sixpenny Reading Public in the 1890s—Margaret Beetham
• "Gay Discourse" and The Artist and the Jourbanal of Home Culture —Laurel Blake Part V: National and Ethnic Identity
• Thomas Campbell Foster and the British Reportage on the Irish Famine 1845-1849—Leslie Williams
• The Nineteenth Century Media and Welsh Identity—Aled Jones
• Constructing a Scottish Identity for Blackwood's Magazine —David Finklestein
• The Creation of the Modern Newspaper Reading Public in Nineteenth Century France—Dean de la Motte
• The Virtual Reading Communities of the London Jourbanal, The New York Ledger and The Australian Jourbanal —Toni Johnson-Woods

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