Nineteenth Century Migration to America

Nineteenth Century Migration to America

by John Bliss
     
 

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Nineteenth Century Migration to America will explore the primarily urban experience of many different nationalities, arriving in the USA, to work in rapidly industrializing cities.

Overview

Nineteenth Century Migration to America will explore the primarily urban experience of many different nationalities, arriving in the USA, to work in rapidly industrializing cities.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Barbara L. Talcroft
Emigrants, immigrants, migrants—names for people who leave one place to enter another—are the focus of this "Children's True Stories: Migration" series about children who have journeyed abroad or migrated within a country. This volume follows four nineteenth-century immigrants to America, offering briefly, but quite efficiently, a look at their former countries, transportation used, and what the newcomers found in America. In 1849 it took six weeks for eleven-year-old John Muir to cross the Atlantic from Scotland to New York. (An attractive color photo shows the Muir house in Dunbar.) Starting in Wisconsin, Muir, always observing nature, ultimately reached California; we remember him as one of the founders of Yosemite National Park and the Sierra Club. From China in 1880 came Lee Chew, a farm boy with ambitions, traveling the cheapest way (a photo shows steerage passengers huddled in blankets on a ship's deck). Lee Chew lived in San Francisco's Chinatown and eventually moved to New York, where he opened a store and wrote a book. Young Annie Moore from Ireland (1892) was the first passenger registered at the brand-new Ellis Island facility (a bronze statue of her can be seen today). Among the many Italians immigrating in 1894 was Garibaldi LaPolla. In New York's East Harlem (pictured in two period photos), his family ran a bakery, where Garibaldi learned the trade, and later wrote an Italian cookbook and a novel about his childhood. Bliss sees the U.S. as a "salad," with each culture adding to the mix. With careful attention to each child's accomplishments, the book features sidebars of extra details, many maps, information about organizations that helped immigrants, and destinations like the restored Tenement Museum on New York's Orchard Street, where kids can take guided tours for different grade levels. Reviewer: Barbara L. Talcroft

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781410940803
Publisher:
Raintree Publishers
Publication date:
07/15/2011
Series:
Children's True Stories: Migration
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,130,328
Product dimensions:
7.50(w) x 10.20(h) x 0.20(d)
Lexile:
NC770L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 11 Years

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