Nini Here and There
  • Nini Here and There
  • Nini Here and There

Nini Here and There

5.0 1
by Anita Lobel
     
 

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Nini the cat is very, very worried. She loves her comfortable windowsill perch in her sunny home in the city. But the clues are clear: Nini's people are going away. Will they take her? Or will they leave her? And if they take her (and, oh, she hopes they do), will she like wherever it is they are going? Will it feel like home?

Anita Lobel's masterful

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Overview

Nini the cat is very, very worried. She loves her comfortable windowsill perch in her sunny home in the city. But the clues are clear: Nini's people are going away. Will they take her? Or will they leave her? And if they take her (and, oh, she hopes they do), will she like wherever it is they are going? Will it feel like home?

Anita Lobel's masterful picture book is for anyone who adores cats and for anyone who has ever moved to a new place. But most of all, it is for anyone who loves coming home.

Editorial Reviews

J. D. Biersdorfer
For younger readers, there is Anita Lobel's Nini Here and There, featuring a tabby cat with abandonment issues and a rich fantasy life. Anybody who's ever tried to stuff a cat into its carrier before a car trip will recognize Nini's reaction when she sees "the big black thing" and tries to burrow under the rug. Despite meows of protest, Nini falls asleep inside her carrier and dreams of all sorts of travel adventures involving elephants, boats and clouds. Lobel's expressive white-gouache and watercolor paintings nicely capture the cat's bewilderment and eventual relief when she pops out of the carrier at the family's country house.
—The New York Times
Publishers Weekly

Lobel brings back the cat featured in One Lighthouse, One Moonin this fetching portrait of a pet subjected to a move. Nini is first seen contentedly gazing out the window of her city digs, where she quickly realizes something is afoot. Spying a large pile of suitcases, books, shoes and other paraphernalia, the perceptive kitty suspects the worst: "Oh no," she thinks, "They are going away. They are going without me." But then she spots "the big black thing" (a cat carrier), which she clearly deems a less than appealing alternative to being left behind. Zipped into the carrier, she meows in protest, but eventually falls asleep, dreaming that she's floating on a cloud, flying in a hot air balloon, sailing in a small boat and riding on both an elephant and a rocking horse-all amusingly depicted in colorful watercolor and gouache paintings. When she awakens after reaching her destination, Nini-and readers-are treated to a breathtaking, full-spread vista of a sprawling backyard, lush with flowers and trees. At first, Nini somewhat skeptically views the local fauna-birds, butterflies, a scurrying mouse and a cheerful-looking dog ("Nini was not sure he was a friend"). But after watching a brilliantly hued sun set and a glowing white moon rise from a new windowsill perch, she curls up in a chair, reflecting that while everything is different, "they did not go away without me." Lobel's realistic renderings of the endearing tabby's visage reveal a range of emotions that cat-familiar readers will recognize. A simple, comforting slice-of-feline-life story. Ages 3-7. (May)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 2
With few words and one gray-striped cat, Lobel addresses a universal and complex theme. Her pictorial description of the feline's home, outside and in, precedes the text; Nini faces outward, her engaging eyes directed toward readers. She surmises from the piles of clothes, equipment, toys, and books that her family is going away, and she attempts to find a perfect perch from which she won't be left behind. She is discovered and placed in a case, and meows herself to sleep. Nini dreams of glorious adventures until her case is unzipped and she is coaxed out into an unfamiliar, yet glorious, sun-dappled landscape. The story concludes with her finding another comfortable perch, again on a windowsill. The sun sets, the moon rises; Nini explores her new surroundings knowing that her family is close by. Lobel's vibrant watercolor and white gouache illustrations and her nod to Matisse's decorative motif, line, and color visually engage readers. Nini's curious eyes and playful gestures, and the warm embrace of the arms that hold her, convey emotions and comfort to those who are wary of being left behind.
—Marian CreamerCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Kirkus Reviews
Nini, the cat from One Lighthouse, One Moon (2000), is dismayed when she sees piles of suitcases: Her family is going away-without her! She tries her usual ploys: lying on a suitcase; stretching across a mound of shoes; sitting on the guitar. Then, she spots the "big black thing." Hiding doesn't work-she's zipped into the carrying bag. Her meows of protest get smaller and smaller until she falls asleep. In her dreams, she flies in a hot-air balloon, bounces on the back of an elephant and rides a rocking horse. When her traveling bag is unzipped, Nini sees beautiful countryside, birds, butterflies and a white dog. From her new windowsill, Nina watches the sun set and moon rise; contented, she sighs, "They did not go away without me." Lobel's hallmark art and design paint a charming tale told by the striped tabby, one that will be quite familiar to cat owners who've experienced the trauma of transporting same. Nini's expressions tell it all. (Picture book. 4-7)
Booklist (starred review)
“Irresistible Nini steals the show.”

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060787677
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
05/08/2007
Pages:
32
Age Range:
4 - 6 Years

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