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Nitro Burnin' Funny Daddy
     

Nitro Burnin' Funny Daddy

5.0 1
by Brian Setzer
 
It's been more than two decades since Brian Setzer wreaked havoc on the ol' time-space continuum by making old-school rockabilly a viable listen for postmodern folks. In the intervening years, the pompadoured guitarist has dipped his six-string into a wide variety of streams, from swing to standards, and on this 12-pack, he splashes around in a goodly number of those

Overview

It's been more than two decades since Brian Setzer wreaked havoc on the ol' time-space continuum by making old-school rockabilly a viable listen for postmodern folks. In the intervening years, the pompadoured guitarist has dipped his six-string into a wide variety of streams, from swing to standards, and on this 12-pack, he splashes around in a goodly number of those past haunts. The onetime Stray Cat has put his orchestra in cold storage, at least temporarily: Nitro Burnin' Funny Daddy, as befits its title, is largely chopped and channeled rock 'n' roll. Even so, there's enough variety to keep listeners on their toes, from the raw riffing of the glamourpuss-bashing "Drink Whiskey and Shut Up" to the moody, Orbison-styled melody weaving of "Wild Wind." Setzer is still capable of reeling off surprising tangents on guitar -- particularly on the cagey instrumental "Rat Pack Boogie" -- but just to keep things interesting, he's willing to shunt his usual axe aside now and then, as on the banjo-led album closer, "When the Bells Don't Chime." The disc's most adventurous track, however, is its most structurally simple: On "St. Jude," Setzer shifts from his usual gas-huffin' good-time wail into a subdued, hymnlike assessment of the need for faith in modern times. Yes, Nitro Burnin' Funny Daddy requires more effort than the usual Brian Setzer release, but listeners willing to hang on tight will be rewarded with a thrilling ride.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Hal Horowitz
After retreating to his big-band persona for 2002's Boogie Woogie Christmas, Setzer drops the horns for a leaner, more eclectic sound on this 2003 release. There is straight-ahead doo wop ("To Be Loved" features a cappella vocals with softly strummed guitar and could have come off a Persuasions album), bluegrass (Setzer shows off his banjo skills on "When the Bells Don't Chime," one of two versions of that song), '50s-style slow dance R&B ("That Someone Just Ain't You"), and of course rockabilly (the instrumental "Rat Pack Boogie" sounds as if it were written with the loungy big band in mind and "Ring, Ring, Ring" seems like a "Stray Cats" outtake). This is also the hardest-rocking Setzer album since his mid-'80s work, as he turns the volume up on rootsy guitar rockers like "Don't Trust a Woman (In a Black Cadillac)" and the bluesy ZZ Top-styled scorching leadoff track, "Sixty Years." Setzer sounds great throughout and little seems forced or calculated. Lyrically he stumbles occasionally, especially on "Sixty Years" as he lambasts the corruption of big money, hardly a unique take on the topic. He also sounds unduly angry on "Drink Whiskey and Shut Up," a song that could have been grabbed off a Reverend Horton Heat album. Setzer's guitar is rightly prominent in the mix. He displays his classic, echoed '50s style and nimble fingers, in particular on the jumpy "Smokin' 'n Burnin'." He even shifts into Ennio Morricone territory on a windswept Wild West ballad "Wild Wind," an evocative, cinematic piece that means well but tries too hard to be "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance" and comes up short. Regardless, this is an enjoyable and extremely varied listen from an artist in his prime who proves that he's far from a one-trick pony. Those who have followed Setzer from his early days will especially appreciate its diversity.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/21/2003
Label:
Ada Mod Afw
UPC:
0640424402228
catalogNumber:
44022
Rank:
14061

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Nitro Burnin' Funny Daddy 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Brian Setzer has done it again! He never ceases to amaze me with his amazing singing and guitar playing. I love the fact that Brian is not afraid to venture into other syles of music such as country and a little bit of the blues mixed in for good measure. Hearing Brian play the Banjo is always a treat! All the songs really kick some serious A@# ! Smoking & Burning and Wild Wind are my favorites. One correction to the above review that Brian stopped playing with the Orchestra. As I write this, the Brian Setzer Orchestra is on a short tour of Japan! Long live Brian and the BSO and what ever else Brian chooses to do. ROCKABILLY ROSS (aka: Ross H. Tipps)