No Acting Please: A Revolutionary Approach to Acting and Living

Overview

A collection of 125 acting exercises that are based on journal excerpts and dialogues from Mr. Morris' classes. These exercises teach the actor to systematically eliminate his or her instrumental obstacles -- tensions, fears, inhibitions -- and explore the "being" state, where the actor does no more and no less than what he or she feels.

As the title indicates, many of the techniques herein address the actor's need to avoid falling into the traps of concept and presentational ...

See more details below
Paperback
$14.07
BN.com price
(Save 11%)$15.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (19) from $2.91   
  • New (9) from $9.49   
  • Used (10) from $2.91   
Sending request ...

Overview

A collection of 125 acting exercises that are based on journal excerpts and dialogues from Mr. Morris' classes. These exercises teach the actor to systematically eliminate his or her instrumental obstacles -- tensions, fears, inhibitions -- and explore the "being" state, where the actor does no more and no less than what he or she feels.

As the title indicates, many of the techniques herein address the actor's need to avoid falling into the traps of concept and presentational acting. There is also a complete chapter on sense memory -- what it is, and how to practice it and apply it as an acting tool.

Co-authored by Joan Hotchkis, and with a Foreword by Jack Nicholson.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"When I read No Acting Please, it put it all together for me.” -- Johnny Depp

"If you want to be still and full, Eric teaches the stuff.” -- Jack Nicholson

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780962970931
  • Publisher: Ermor Enterprises
  • Publication date: 4/28/1995
  • Pages: 174
  • Sales rank: 515,448
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 9.04 (h) x 0.52 (d)

Meet the Author

Eric Morris, one of the most sought-after acting coaches in the country, has been teaching acting for 50 years. Also an actor, he has played more than a hundred roles on stage, on television and in films. His theater and home are in Los Angeles.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2008

    A reviewer

    I love this book and recommend it to anyone studying acting...give it a chance and read it through!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 4, 2007

    A reviewer

    This no-nonsense book put acting into perspective for me. Whenever I am in trouble in a scene, I come back to the exercises and they pull me through. What's more, the techniques don't only improve the quality or life of your performance onstage in the world of make-believe, it helps you become a more well-rounded person offstage in the real world as well.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2005

    Acting that makes sense...

    I¿ll admit that at first glance Eric Morris¿s System can seem scary and misaligned. But I believe it to be a very misunderstood system. I too was skeptical in the beginning, but after studying this technique (with Eric, but mostly with Anthony Vincent Bova in NYC, Eric¿s protégé), and after seeing the difference from 'acting' and what this Work creates, there's no way I'd ever go back to the 'acting' form. Eric Morris teaches the actor how to react honestly and in the moment, including everything that¿s going on inside and out¿the other actor, the props, the imagined objects that one might be working for¿that impels you to ¿do¿ whatever the character is required to ¿do¿, but out of a real reaction, not just because you¿re doing it. I've studied Adler, Strasberg, Meisner, and with Robert Lewis. I've hashed through the process of verbs, actions, objectives, obstacles, and onward and they're all good and dandy for figuring out what's going on in a script, what the characters are doing and why but other than that, these techniques never helped me figure out HOW to make it real to ME... How to get to a place where I'm actually functioning from a real, organic, truthful state ... How to get to the point where I am 'doing' all the script tells me to do, fulfilling the 'actions,' out of an honest REACTION to what¿s going on¿. Not just ¿playing¿ as if I am how, in essence, to create the realities of the character¿. No matter where you go, all the great teachers (and actors) say the same thing, 'Acting is reacting.' Even the most used and cherished word in the actor¿s language, LISTENING, is about focusing outside of yourself and REACTING to what is there. This Work trains the actor to create the stimuli that will fulfill the demands of the piece, specifically, wholly, and with Truth. For the most part, plays and movies are imagined circumstances, and we as actors, have to create stimuli to react from, so we¿re not just faking, or indicating our performance. I'd rather watch two people have a relationship on film or on stage, than two actors reciting words, no matter how well they 'act' it. If they don¿t believe it, I won¿t. This System trains you to create those stimuli and REACT to them honestly, fully and truthfully. A crucial part of Eric's System is based on Instrumental Work, which is the process of identifying blocks and fears and tensions to expression and, one-by-one, through the use of hundreds of exercises, eliminating them. It's really about self-awareness¿learning about yourself and how you function, so you can ¿get out of your way¿ and function truthfully on stage or film and get to where you need to get to in a scene. I think this is the aim of every method, but I feel that this System is the only one to address the issues of the actor on a personal level. If I'm tense and depressed (in real life me the actor), I'm not going to be able to REACT truthfully in a scene where the character has just won the lottery and is jumping with joy. If I push for the emotion, I'll be faking and will 'act' that I'm joyful. If this is enough for you, then Eric's work is definitely not your thing. But if you're looking for creating reality and REACTING with truth, nothing surpasses this Work. I know that Meryl Streep, Brando, Ed Norton, Johnny Depp, Jack Nicholson, Al Pacino, Robert DeNiro, and a handful of other amazing actors don't fake it, don't just indicate the realities of the character and the circumstances. They create them. Be it imagined stimuli they are creating, or through the available stimulus around them, they open themselves up and REACT truthfully to everything ¿the other actors, the set, the space, the props, the object or person via Sense Memory, etc. I KNOW they do this for a fact! They¿ve talked about it for years. Eric helps you get to the place that they do¿where you can function truthfully, where your instrument is accessible and available, where you are open and are willing to

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)