The No Asshole Rule: Building a Civilized Workplace and Surviving One That Isn't
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The No Asshole Rule: Building a Civilized Workplace and Surviving One That Isn't

3.9 81
by Robert I. Sutton
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0446526568

ISBN-13: 9780446526562

Pub. Date: 02/22/2007

Publisher: Grand Central Publishing

The No Asshole Rule is a New York Times, Wall Street Journal, USA Today and Business Week bestseller.

Overview

The No Asshole Rule is a New York Times, Wall Street Journal, USA Today and Business Week bestseller.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780446526562
Publisher:
Grand Central Publishing
Publication date:
02/22/2007
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
5.70(w) x 8.30(h) x 1.00(d)

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The No Asshole Rule: Building a Civilized Workplace and Surviving One that Isn't 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 81 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am a television producer who couldn't resist buying this book, since unfortunately, bad behavior is the norm where I live and work. Ironically, it is also a killer of creativity, the one commodity that Hollywood needs on an neverending basis. The book was full of wonderful, relatable examples of how 'certified' a-holes truly create an unproductive and unhealthy work environment, not to mention the personal fallout for the receivers. I especially enjoyed Sutton's little quizzes for determining a-hole behavior, his tips for how to combat being on the losing end, and the last chapter, 'The No A-Hole Rule as a Way of Life.'
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Make sure it shouldn't be pointed at yourself. Many thanks to the woman on the flight to Nashville who suggested this book. She was an HR person and even though I am not, I got so much out of this book. And thanks to my Nook for sparking the conversation about "best book you've read lately" on the flight in the first place!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have never read a book the depicted someone I worked for as closely as this book. Now I fully understand that I'm not crazy and any sane person would have wanted to quit after being treated as poorly as I had been by this one 'asshole' that I worked with. I truly enjoyed this book and at times actually laughed out loud. To think that there is a way to keep these people out of the workplace is awesome. Now all we need to do is make this book mandatory for all HR Managers and every student in college so that they don't become one of them, or better yet, can recognize them for what they truly are.
Alla_S More than 1 year ago
This book is a manual about making one's work place a nicer place to be. As the title suggests, the focus of the book is on the co-workers, specifically the "tough-to-get-along-with" personalities. The first half of this book is aimed at the higher management, with tips how to weed out those types during the hiring process, as the author logically believes that once they're hired, they influence more of the same type of people to join the company-until the whole place becomes a breeding ground for jerks. Such a work atmosphere, as the author points out, actually hinders productivity and overall morale. Sutton's second half of the book discusses dealing with difficult co-workers. A chapter is devoted to strategies for dealing with them at work, while other chapters are aimed at getting rid of your own inner jerk and, for better understanding, the benefits of acting like a jerk where Sutton explains the psychology behind such behavior. Overall, this was a quick read. Sutton is a professor at Stanford, and actually based this book off a Harvard Review article he wrote about the same topic. I thought the idea behind the book was pretty interesting. If you're looking for a short take on "the toxic workplace," than this is for you.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Sutton the author of this book is a management science and engineering professor from Stanford. In this book he suggests (correctly, in my opinion) that we can all be difficult sometimes and that being difficult can, in certain scenarios, actually contribute to our effectiveness as managers. However, he counteracts this argument with the reality that some people are 'certified¿ you know whats who are difficult to fire because they are often in positions of authority and are mistakenly deemed talented and effective by their superiors. It's a fun and readable book, that shows you how to deal with these folks and create and I think anyone with people issues will benefit from using it to inspire some fresh thinking. The other gem I've found helpful in these situations (for dealing with difficult people and keeping myself under control) is The Emotional Intelligence Quick Book
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am so glad that Bob Sutton's book is an instruction in memory for me rather than the survival guide it is for so many. Thirty years in business means I have seen more than my fair share of a***holes and while they may be inevaitable, they can be resisted and fought. Sutton's real innovation is in creating a 'total cost of a***holes' showing the real detriment to the business that these jerks actually are. Smart, funny, quick and spot-on.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is quintessential for all aspects of life. This book helped me to see in all situations that there are people who can disrupt and destroy even the most noble of causes. Highly recommended and empowering.
CardiacRN More than 1 year ago
Great point of view on workplace bullies and there effect of the workplace culture. Adapted from a Harvard Business Review article. Well researched and clearly presented thesis.
LN_Adcox More than 1 year ago
There are few revelations in this book for those of us who work in an environment rampant with as*holes. However, it is affirming to have an independent, unsolicited authority describe the perpetrators, the environment and the impact. Sutton's quantification of certified as*holes (CAs) as distinguished from occasional as*holes and his definition of a decent person is useful. Sutton provides an "As*hole Test" and describes the "Dirty Dozen" traits. However, the best indicator is how a higher status person treats a lower status person. The CA consistently insults, demeans and personally attacks those of lesser status. The person that is "persistently warm and civilized toward people of unknown or lower status.is a decent human being". The impact of an overabundance of CAs on employees is devastating because it saps energy and esteem. The results, which are detrimental to both employee and company, include reduced productivity, less work and life satisfaction, heightened depression, irritability and anger. Sutton also points out that in a fear based organization (i.e., management by intimidation) the last thing employees want is the spotlight on them. Hence they are afraid to offer input and help solve problems when they know how to do so. Poor communication, no diversity of ideas, poor morale, and lack of employee empowerment makes a company's decision making much less intelligent. Legal costs are also higher in organizations that are led by or that shelter CAs as employee claims are easier to prove when open hostility runs rampant. In addition, Sutton attempts to quantify the total cost of as*holes (TCA), offers suggestions on how to implement a "No As*hole Rule", and provides some common sense survival strategies for those unable to escape an as*hole rich environment. The tragedy is that those as*holes out there that most need to read this book, especially in senior management, are probably the less likely to do so.
Sarasvatia More than 1 year ago
Prof. Sutton's book is a super timely book that should be required reading for employers, as well as our political leaders. Our labour practices are getting more and more weird by the day, week and month. http://exquisitehumanity.blogspot.com/2010/06/unemployed-will-not-be-considered.html
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a great read! I helped me deal with my own work place situation. I am sooo glad I found this book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This CD was a great deal from B&N (cheap!) and the content was better than expected. The author, a professor from Stanford, somehow knows a lot more about the workplace than most corporate people I've worked for over the years. He even practices what he preaches...his work group refuses to ruin their civil climate by keeping creeps, bullies, and a**holes OUT of the mix. Oh, how I wish I had the luxury! There's a true story Sutton tells about a community that accidentally loses their a**holes (I won't ruin it for you) that had me in stitches. I've relayed the story to friends and they've cracked up, too. This book should be a required course for management. I've been tempted to leave the CD in my VP's mailbox! Our company could get so much more done if we could get rid of the bullies who stonewall projects, back-stab, and generally make our jobs tougher just because their methods worked on the playground in elementary school.
RolfDobelli More than 1 year ago
Robert I. Sutton, Ph.D., professor of organizational behavior, teaches management science at Stanford University. He is a learned, respected academic. Is it odd that such an erudite, sophisticated individual would write a book with profanity in its title? Not according to Sutton. Yes, mean-spirited, nasty people are weasels and dirty rats. But the word that ideally summarizes such a person, Sutton says, is in his title, so that's what he uses. He first employed it in a much-quoted piece in the Harvard Business Review. He expanded that article into this book, which explains why the business world seems to be knee deep in ratfinks, how to avoid them and how to deal with them when you must. getAbstract suggests that if you work in an office or hospital or bank or submarine or massage parlor, or on a cement crew, loading dock, oilrig or spaceship to Mars, you probably must deal with your share of - let's call them weasels. Sutton's book teaches you how to do so most effectively and not get too banged up in the process.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It may seem like pure shock to use the 'A-hole' word in the title of a book, but anyone with life or business experience knows that certain people are gold-plated a-holes. This book is exceptional in that it characterizes their behavior in complete and accurate terms. Moreover, this book addresses the reality that professional cultures can insipre this class of people, or even make them thrive. Microsoft comes to mind as a perfect example. So it's not about whether or not they exist, it's about survival. This book is aid and comfort to the many who suffer through the tyranny of the a-hole.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Sutton gets it just right in this highly entertaining and relevant book. We all know people like those described in the book. And coping with them - or better yet keeping them out of our work lives - is a problem worth solving. It's nice to see someone in academia who embraces the practical concerns of real-life managers. Sutton's blend of case studies and thoughtful analysis is like a tonic for the spirit of those of us who have endured the sphincterage of terrible colleagues. You might wish that Sutton had written this book a while ago. Do your children a favor and save a copy for them. They'll need it.
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