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Overview


It’s winter and little bear doesn’t want to go to sleep. He’d rather play, and he’s sure he won’t get cold outside, no matter how long the winter is, how deep the snow might get, or how hard the storm might blow. Until, that is, little bear finds himself all alone in a snowstorm. Claudia Rueda’s classic picture-book illustrations, with their simple, strong lines, shapes, and colors, show a very determined little bear and his mother in a striking, increasingly snowy landscape. Children everywhere identify with ...
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Overview


It’s winter and little bear doesn’t want to go to sleep. He’d rather play, and he’s sure he won’t get cold outside, no matter how long the winter is, how deep the snow might get, or how hard the storm might blow. Until, that is, little bear finds himself all alone in a snowstorm. Claudia Rueda’s classic picture-book illustrations, with their simple, strong lines, shapes, and colors, show a very determined little bear and his mother in a striking, increasingly snowy landscape. Children everywhere identify with little bear as mama figures out how to tell him no.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Rueda returns to a setting close to that of 2009’s My Little Polar Bear (a snowy landscape), with similar characters (a mother bear and cub), and even a similar plot device (youngster caught in a snowstorm). As with that book, the spreads are cold and spare. The bears resemble paper cutouts; the palette is limited to austere white, blues, grays, and browns; the surfaces are clean and unworked; and dots of snow provide movement. Yet the books differ in approach. Before, the narrative soothed; here it takes the form of a lively conversation. “ ‘It’s time to go to sleep,’ said mother bear. ‘No,’ said little bear. ‘I don’t want to go to sleep.’ ” She warns him that he’ll “freeze out here,” to which he retorts, “I’m not cold.” Back and forth they banter, until a storm demonstrates how reassuring the safety of their den can be. Little Bear denies any weakness, though: “Winter is very long,” he tells his mother, “and I thought you might get lonely.” Rebellious children will recognize themselves with a smile. Ages 2-5. (Aug.)
Children's Literature - Beverley Fahey
With a little one's stubbornness, little bear balks at his mother's gentle suggestions that it is time to hibernate. With childlike bravado he tells he her will not get cold, will save a few berries in case he gets hungry, is strong enough to brave the cold wind, and no matter how much it snows it won't bother him because, "I love snow." Soon a storm begins and the fun turns to fear when little bear no longer can see his mother in the whiteout. With plaintive cries of "Mama!" he scurries back to her because she might get lonely during the long winter. Little bear's attempt at independence will strike a chord with preschoolers who will want this one read again and again. The warm conversation between mother and child is reminiscent of the banter in Margaret Wise Brown's Runaway Bunny. The flat, well composed illustrations are rendered in a cool winter palette of blues, grays, and browns with the fluffy white flakes of snow giving way to a raging storm where just snippets of bear's fur can be seen. The minimal simple text is given its punch by the strength of the illustrations. This one has winner written all over it. Reviewer: Beverley Fahey
School Library Journal
PreS-K—Little bear doesn't want to hibernate. His mother gives many reasons why it's time to go to sleep—winter is very long, the wind will blow hard, and the snow will be deep—but cub has a counterpoint for every argument. "'You'll freeze out here,' said mother bear./'I'm not cold,' said little bear." "'There's no food to eat,' said mother bear./'I saved some berries,' said little bear." When the cub finds himself alone in a storm, he realizes that maybe staying out in the cold by himself wasn't the best idea. Spare illustrations with strong lines and shapes pleasantly portray this simple story. Three wordless spreads depict little bear's time alone in the increasingly snowy landscape. Sure to be a crowd pleaser.—Sarah Polace, Cuyahoga County Public Library, Parma, OH
Kirkus Reviews

As she did in My Little Polar Bear (2009), Rueda creates a conversation between mother and cub. This time, however, a little black bear is asserting his independence by using one of his favorite words: "NO." Mother suggests that it is time to hibernate for the winter, but little bear has other ideas. With each gentle warning from mother—"The wind will blow hard"—little bear has an assured response. "I am very strong," he says. So he is left alone, celebrating his victory. But when a blinding snowstorm practically buries little bear, he realizes mother might have known best. He rushes back to the cave. But he'll certainly never admit the real reason to Mamma, instead impishly suggesting that he's just there to keep her company. Flat figures in a minimal wintry palette nevertheless burst with personality, abetted by clever compositions. Set against a spare, pale background, snow falls down in bold splatters, increasing with each page turn. Little bear's tireless opposition will resonate with every parent, and maybe—just maybe—a toddler or two will learn a lesson along the way. (Picture book. 2-5)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780888999917
  • Publisher: Groundwood Books
  • Publication date: 7/29/2010
  • Pages: 44
  • Sales rank: 803,902
  • Age range: 2 - 5 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.40 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.40 (d)

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