No Dogs Allowed!

No Dogs Allowed!

by Anne Davis
     
 

Feline friends Bud and Gabby are back! But this time—and much to Bud's dismay—there's a dog in the picture. The dog's name is Cookie, and although fun-loving Gabby enjoys Cookie's company, grouchy Bud does not. In fact, Bud gets so fed up with Cookie that he kicks her out of the house. "No dogs allowed!" he declares. But when a big black rain cloud

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Overview

Feline friends Bud and Gabby are back! But this time—and much to Bud's dismay—there's a dog in the picture. The dog's name is Cookie, and although fun-loving Gabby enjoys Cookie's company, grouchy Bud does not. In fact, Bud gets so fed up with Cookie that he kicks her out of the house. "No dogs allowed!" he declares. But when a big black rain cloud approaches and Gabby looks worried, will Bud have a change of heart?

Greeting card artist Anne Davis offers sly humor and bold, expressive art in a story that is pitch-purrfect in every way.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
PreS-K—Orange tabby Bud returns with his black-and-white pal Gabby. He is not amused when a floppy-eared hound shows up at the front door. Once inside, the dog sits in his chair, sniffs too much, and uses that big pink tongue to distraction. Gabby tries to share a snack and a book with the pup, but Bud declares, "No dogs allowed," and insists that Cookie leave. Soon, a nasty storm and Gabby's watchful gaze bring Bud's conscience back, and the cats don slickers to rescue the soggy hound with their huge, purple umbrella. Blankets, popcorn, and cocoa soothe feelings. Davis uses flat, folk-art-inspired paintings in rich colors for her successfully simple scenes.—Gay Lynn Van Vleck, Henrico County Library, Glen Allen, VA
Kirkus Reviews

Proof, once again, that archetypal enemies can become friends.

Bud, a large marmalade cat with strong opinions and decidedly anthropomorphic appearance and abilities, is perfectly happy living and playing with his cat friend Gabby, as readers of their eponymous first adventure may remember. The sudden appearance of Cookie, a black-and-white dog, displeases Bud mightily. Gentle Gabby, however, seems only too willing to make friends with the interloper. Bud puts up with Cookie's antics at first but soon grows jealous and insists that dogs aren't allowed in their house. Then a storm cloud and Gabby's tender heart persuade him otherwise. Simple declarative sentences communicate the action concisely but also allow for subtle humor, as when Bud observes "Umbrellas are tricky for cats..." Richly colored paintings have a primitive feel that meshes well with the understated text. Effective, if potentially confusing, multiple representations of the same character on a single page convey movement, while slight changes in the position of ears and eyes telegraph changing emotions. There are no real surprises and not much obvious motivation for Bud's about-face, but readers will likely be pleased with the happy ending.

Definitely predictable but potentially entertaining, as well as useful to parents looking for yet another paean to the merits of learning to share. (Picture book. 3-6)

Children's Literature - Mary Bowman-Kruhm Ed.D.
The subtle message about the value of diversity is the theme of this charming story. Colorful, primitive-style pictures add to the story of Cookie, the winsome and naive dog that infuriates Bud, the grumpy cat narrating the story. Cookie's every move irritates Bud, but his cat friend Gabby likes Cookie. However, Gabby goes along with Bud and they send the dog out of the house. Then the weather changes and the cats worry about Cookie. At last Bud relents, "And out we went into the wet, windy night." Cookie is hiding under the porch, "all shivery and cold and alone." Back home, Bud and Gabby make Cookie warm and comfortable. In return, Cookie thanks Bud by planting a slurpy kiss on his face, Gabby makes popcorn and they "all shared the comfy chair." Although a picture book, the large sans serif font, with few multisyllabic words per page, make this book appropriate for beginning readers. This is a wonderful book to use in a class that includes children who, for whatever reason, may be seen as different. Highly recommended. Reviewer: Mary Bowman-Kruhm, Ed.D.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060753535
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
05/10/2011
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,383,641
Product dimensions:
8.20(w) x 10.20(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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