No Easy Choice

( 2 )

Overview

In No Easy Choice, Ellen Painter Dollar tells her gut-wrenching story of living with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI)—a disabling genetic bone disorder that was passed down to her first child—and deciding whether to conceive a second child who would not have OI using assisted reproduction. Her story brings to light the ethical dilemmas surrounding advanced reproductive technologies. What do procedures such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) say about how we define human worth?...

See more details below
Paperback (New Edition)
$14.49
BN.com price
(Save 27%)$20.00 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (22) from $3.02   
  • New (11) from $9.00   
  • Used (11) from $3.02   
No Easy Choice: A Story of Disability, Parenthood, and Faith in an Age of Advanced Reproduction

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.99
BN.com price
(Save 33%)$15.00 List Price

Overview

In No Easy Choice, Ellen Painter Dollar tells her gut-wrenching story of living with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI)—a disabling genetic bone disorder that was passed down to her first child—and deciding whether to conceive a second child who would not have OI using assisted reproduction. Her story brings to light the ethical dilemmas surrounding advanced reproductive technologies. What do procedures such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) say about how we define human worth? If we avoid such procedures, are we permitting the suffering of our children? How do we identify a "good life" in a consumer society that values appearance, success, health, and perfection?

Dollar considers multiple sides of the debate, refusing to accept the matter as simply black and white. Her book will help parents who want to understand and make good decisions about assisted reproduction, as well as those who support and counsel them, including pastors and medical professionals.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Part memoir, part theological treatise, this book offers a refreshingly candid and nuanced grappling with assisted reproduction that will be valuable to many Christians wishing to engage with the ethical questions raised by this new medical technology. Dollar, who suffers from a genetic disorder better known as “brittle bone disease,” wanted to spare her offspring the suffering she endured by testing her fertilized eggs for the mutation before they were implanted in her uterus. (There was a 50% chance her child would inherit the mutation.) Opposed to abortion, she and her husband reasoned that embryos in a petri dish are not the same as a fetus growing inside a womb. Nevertheless, she wondered if such technological advances might not hasten a world of designer babies selected to minimize the chances of pain, sickness, and disability. With an estimated four million babies conceived through in-vitro fertilization and rapid advances in genetic testing, such questions have never been more urgent, yet they are often left to couples to sort through on their own. This well-written, insightful account should serve as a resource to anyone who ponders the intersection of medicine, ethics, and parenthood. (Jan.)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780664236908
  • Publisher: Presbyterian Publishing
  • Publication date: 11/7/2011
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 208
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author


Ellen Painter Dollar is a writer and mother of three living in West Hartford, Connecticut. She has written about faith, motherhood, and disability for a variety of organizations, publications, and blogs, including Christianity Today, the American Medical Association, the Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation, the Hartford Courant, and the Episcopal Cafe. She currently blogs at Patheos.com. Visit her Web site at ellenpainterdollar.com.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 26, 2012

    In No Easy Choice, Ellen Painter Dollar has written a moving mem

    In No Easy Choice, Ellen Painter Dollar has written a moving memoir of her experiences wrestling with reproductive ethics mixed with a solid discussion of the topic. In her own life, it was a genetic disorder leading to her own disability, not infertility, that lead her and her husband to the doctor’s office. Their decision to use pre implantation genetic diagnosis brought up many ethical and spiritual questions. Following her compelling desire to spare her children of suffering while trying to discern her Christian ethical duty takes the reader through the difficult decision making process. It is a revealing peek into one woman’s emotional and physical journey.

    Her conclusions are not those of certainty of moral outcome, but rather that more discussion and resources should be available for couples struggling with the imponderables of assisted reproduction. This book serves as one of those resources now available. What more can we offer one another than our own experiences to learn from? By sharing our stories, we can show others how to find their own way in similar circumstances.

    As a former embryologist from a fertility clinic, I enjoyed her insights from a patient’s perspective. It can be hard to entirely appreciate the journey from a different vantage point. This well reasoned and thoughtful book would be a valuable tool for not only reproductive professionals, but especially clergy and other counselors who support couples making hard choices. While her personal medical situation related to pre implantation genetic diagnosis with IVF, it would be interesting and helpful for others thinking through how to emotionally and spiritually find peace with advanced medical reproduction.

    I would recommend this book to those in any stage of fertility treatment, as well as their support circles. When faced with advanced reproductive choices, many people find that they know very little about not only the science behind what is really possible, but even more so the deeper meaning attached to decisions that are made.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 1, 2012

    Dollar asks you to examine your own position

    Let me state up front that I've never had IVF. I've not lived with a disability and I'm not a Christian. In fact, I lean more to atheism than agnosticism. Despite those clear differences between myself and the author, I found myself contemplating the ethical choices and moral positions I thought were firm.

    The book is very well written, with beautifully woven stories of anecdote and science, which remind us that although there seem to be limitless possibility for reproductive choices, there are real families at the heart of the matter. The ethical decisions seem to not have a proper wrong or right- just what fits for each family at that point in time.

    Clearly this is a book written by someone with a deep faith, but it's not written with a heavy hand in that regard. You clearly understand the author's relationship with God, the impact that has had upon her life, and how that relationship has guided the choices she and her husband made in regard to their family planning. You are not, however, left with the feeling that you were being preached to. Rather, you understand how it's impossible for someone of any faith to make IVF decisions lightly- especially given the weight of screening a disability.

    For a first release, I am greatly impressed and can't wait for the next work to come from Mrs. Dollar.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)