No English

Overview


“No English” is all that Blanca, the new girl from Argentina, says. She spends her time drawing pictures instead of doing class work and that hardly seems fair to second-grader Diane. One misunderstanding follows another until Diane begins to see how afraid Blanca must feel in their classroom. Their teacher, Mrs. Bertram, helps her class understand that “different” is just different, not strange or weird. She encourages them to learn about Blanca’s home country. Diane must make things right, but how will she do ...
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Overview


“No English” is all that Blanca, the new girl from Argentina, says. She spends her time drawing pictures instead of doing class work and that hardly seems fair to second-grader Diane. One misunderstanding follows another until Diane begins to see how afraid Blanca must feel in their classroom. Their teacher, Mrs. Bertram, helps her class understand that “different” is just different, not strange or weird. She encourages them to learn about Blanca’s home country. Diane must make things right, but how will she do that when they don’t speak the same language?
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Editorial Reviews

Elizabeth Ward
…a lovely story of a cross-cultural friendship…
—The Washington Post
Children's Literature
“No English” is a lovely story of how friendship can overcome the boundaries of language. Blanca, the new girl in school, speaks no English. The classroom teacher, who is sensitive to Blanca’s predicament, asks the class to imagine themselves being surrounded by people they do not understand. She helps the students brainstorm ideas for making Blanca feel welcome. After several unsuccessful attempts at befriending her, Diane, who sits in the desk next to Blanca, finally is able to communicate with her by drawing pictures. They exchange pictures of their family members and begin giggling and whispering during class and soon find themselves in the assistant principal’s office for disciplining. He immediately recognizes the value of their shared drawings, but reminds the girls to be more attentive during class. The next day he displays their pictures outside the office for everyone to admire. Blanca and Diane become the best of friends and eventually Blanca overcomes her inability to speak and understand English. She even teaches the other students how to count in Spanish during a jump rope game! The text is accompanied by soft watercolor illustrations which clearly depict the students’ emotions. This would be an excellent addition to any elementary school library collection. Reviewer: Theresa Finch
School Library Journal

K-Gr 3
Second-grader Diane has some difficulties with a new student from Argentina due to their lack of a common language, until the girls realize that they can communicate through their drawings. The story subtly explains how miscommunication and misunderstandings can happen on both sides, without being didactic. The watercolor pictures are realistic, offering varied facial expressions and lots of diversity in the classroom, and the pictures correlate well with the text. This title would be appropriate for use in a group setting or for individual or one-on-one reading. The story is similar to Mary Hoffman's The Color of Home (Penguin, 2002) and Aliki's Marianthe's Story: Painted Words/Spoken Memories (Greenwillow, 1998). An additional purchase for libraries looking for more titles about new ESL students.
—Natasha ForresterCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781587264740
  • Publisher: Spry Publishing LLC
  • Publication date: 7/28/2007
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 436,327
  • Age range: 5 - 10 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.80 (w) x 10.10 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author


Jacqueline Jules is an elementary school librarian at Timber Lane Elementary in Fairfax County, Virginia. One of her former students inspired the character of Blanca in this story. Like all school librarians, Jacqueline loves reading and talking about children's literature. She is the author of seven other books for children including a picture book series about a giant mythological bird called the Ziz. The latest title in that series is The Ziz and the Hanukkah Miracle. Jules has also written poems and stories that have appeared in numerous publications including Cicada, Cricket, Spider, Ladybug, and Highlights Magazine. The mother of two grown sons, she lives in Arlington, Virginia, as an empty nester with her husband, Alan.

Amy Huntington lives with her husband in an old farmhouse in Williston, Vermont. She attended Swain School of Design in New Bedford, Massachusetts, The University of Florida, and graduated from The University of Vermont.
She wrote and illustrated One Monday, her first picture book. She illustrated Grandma Drove the Garbage Truck by Katie Clark. Amy stays busy illustrating, writing, learning to spin wool and to play the guitar.

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