No Excuses!: The True Story of a Congenital Amputee Who Became a Champion in Wrestling and in Life

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Overview

Born without arms or legs below his elbows and knees, Kyle Maynard excels as a champion athlete, inspirational speaker, college student and male model. No Excuses is his inspirational autobiography that shows how a positive can-do attitude gives someone we might see as disadvantaged the advantage over life.
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No Excuses: The True Story of a Congenital Amputee Who Became a Champion in Wrestling And in Life

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Overview

Born without arms or legs below his elbows and knees, Kyle Maynard excels as a champion athlete, inspirational speaker, college student and male model. No Excuses is his inspirational autobiography that shows how a positive can-do attitude gives someone we might see as disadvantaged the advantage over life.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780895260116
  • Publisher: Regnery Publishing, Inc., An Eagle Publishing Company
  • Publication date: 9/25/2005
  • Pages: 243
  • Sales rank: 520,055
  • Product dimensions: 6.28 (w) x 9.08 (h) x 0.99 (d)

First Chapter

No Excuses

The True Story of a Congenital Amputee Who became a Champion in Wrestling and in Life
By Kyle Maynard

Regnery Publishing, Inc.

Copyright © 2005 Kyle Maynard
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0-89526-011-5


Chapter One

Firstborn

My parents were full of anticipation as they stepped into the obstetrician's office. There were so many hoops to jump through and things to experience-the questionnaire to answer, the nurse to sign them in, and the month-old magazines piled in stacks on tables. Waiting to be called into the back room seemed like an eternity.

For most parents, their unborn child is imagined perfectly, as the ideal combination of all the best facets of husband and wife mixed into one brand new person. In a loving family, the child represents the hopes and dreams for a next generation, sure to be smart, athletic, and beautiful. As you look at an ultrasound, you see the next Einstein, the next Jeter, Gretzky, or Jordan-or if it's two heartbeats, they're the new improved Venus and Serena.

For my parents, as there must be for any pregnancy, there was always a chance something could be out of order-so they made every effort to take all the appropriate precautions and followed every recommendation to ensure a healthy child. And they knew that the first pregnancy can be a stressful period, because so many things have the chance to go wrong.

I was their first born child, so these emotions weighed on my parents, Scott and Anita, all the more. But my mother's pregnancy had been completely normal. So as they prayed for a healthy and happy child that could grow up to fulfill their greatest dreams, sharing their emotions and their hopes for the future, they had no reason to worry. There were no problems. There was no reason for concern. The quiet fears were all drowned out by their eagerness to see their child for the first time.

Medical technology wasn't quite as advanced in those days as it is now. The clarity of today's ultrasound is a world away from the grainy pictures of a mere two decades ago. But the technology was still good enough to detect some of the things that might appear to be off-it could show doctors the signs of a difficult pregnancy, or something worse.

The nurse that day was kind and pleasant. She told my mother there was nothing to worry about-she was familiar with so many families who don't nurture their unborn children, either because they don't know any better, or because they don't care. Apathy is the main reason why so many children face dangerous problems, she said-and with all the effort my parents had put into being healthy and valuing this unborn life as an equal part of the family, my mother was doubtlessly carrying a perfectly healthy baby.

The nurse took the cold gel and slathered it across my mother's stomach, moving the ultrasound sensor methodically around her womb. She pointed out my head, abdomen, and beating heart for my parents on the blurry pictures. Then she began to make measurements to get an idea of my anticipated birth date. She measured the circumference of my head and midsection along with my spine.

A sudden look of confusion crossed the nurse's face, but she continued to move the sensor around to view different areas. The pulse from the ultrasound broke the deafening silence with a rhythmic beat.

My mother was fixated on the sensor moving across her abdomen, saying that it was making the baby kick-but my father noticed the bewildered look on the nurse's face. He looked at the monitor, trying to make out the blurry picture.

The nurse explained that she was having trouble finding the baby's femur. The leg measurements are how the doctors estimate the child's age, and sometimes the leg is tucked close to the torso. She decided to find a doctor, just to double check the pictures from the machine.

When the nurse excused herself from the room and stepped outside, my parents started to feel nervous. My father couldn't hear the conversation from inside the room, but he shared a concerned look with my mother.

"I'm sure everything is going to be okay," my father said. "This probably happens all the time, and we just don't know it."

Before my mother could reply, a radiologist stepped into the room. He greeted my parents cordially and started to analyze the reading from the ultrasound, looking closely at the ultrasound monitor. The room was dead silent as my parents watched him, chilly with the cold of the hospital air conditioner.

Finally, the radiologist's chair creaked as he turned and said, "I believe everything looks normal ... You two have nothing to worry about."

The assistant couldn't find my limbs, but the radiologist said that, after a few minutes of searching, he had found something that looked like it might be a femur, or at least something they could measure to determine my age. The radiologist passed the sensor back to the nurse and asked her to see if this measurement seemed to match their estimates. It matched perfectly.

The radiologist reassured my parents that sometimes limbs can be hard to find, as they can get pushed behind the placenta, making it difficult to obtain a good image. Oftentimes it will even appear that something is missing when it isn't.

He'd seen this sort of thing happen on a number of occasions, and he'd never seen skewed ultrasound results end up as anything other than a normal birth. The chance of a child being born with minor limb dysfunction is one out of every few thousand, and the likelihood that the child would be born with all four limbs severely affected is one out of every few million.

The radiologist had a lengthy conversation with my parents, explaining the situation. He told them in nearly all cases where a child is born with a serious birth defect, the ultrasound will detect it. He saw nothing in the ultrasound to be cause for worry. If they found something later, the doctor said, they could discuss other options.

"What other options?"

"Other options generally involve aborting the child surgically," the doctor said. "If there is a serious dismemberment in the child, then the likelihood that the child could have a normal life is drastically reduced. Instead of putting that burden on the parents to care for a physically challenged child, we generally recommend you abort."

"That's not an option for us. We would never consider it."

The doctor told my parents to go home and rest easy. With a child that is only seventeen weeks old, these things happen quite often. He said he was confident they had a perfectly healthy child.

"Don't waste your energy worrying about something that virtually never happens. Save it for when the child is born."

My parents thanked the radiologist for taking the time to analyze the ultrasound, and the nurse apologized for the false alarm. But when my parents left the office, they were both worried.

For the next five months, my mother had regular check-ups that never indicated anything would be wrong. They even had another ultrasound in the third trimester and found nothing wrong. My parents' feelings of worry were gradually pushed away as they prepared for my arrival with hope and confidence.

They were shocked when I was born.

TRAUMA IN THE DELIVERY ROOM

It was a bright Sunday morning, March 23, 1986, when my mother felt the first delivery contractions. The abrupt pain was a clear sign that it was time to head to the hospital.

My parents lingered in the delivery room together. Walter Reed Army Medical Hospital was, at that time, the premier hospital in Washington D.C., and for my father-a military policeman-it was the obvious place to go.

My parents spent hours discussing their hopes for their child, still unaware of whether it would be a boy or a girl. My parents were young, only a year into their marriage, and still very excited with the newness of it all. They good-naturedly disagreed about how many children they wanted to have-my father wanting a small family, my mother wanting a large one.

They started to feel a little fatigued as hours passed by and the contractions continued. My mother's water still hadn't broken, and she had been in labor for more than twelve hours. An epidural was administered through an IV as the contractions moved closer together.

By late Monday morning the water still had not broken. The doctors at Walter Reed decided that it was time to break the water and give additional medicine to my mother to hasten the contractions. Two nurses and a pediatrician joined the family obstetrician in the delivery room as my mother's contractions intensified. It wouldn't be long now, they assured my parents.

At 12:13 PM on Monday March 24, 1986, I came into the world. I was facedown and tucked in the fetal position.

My father was at the bedside, gripping my mother's hand. He wasn't able to see my face or chest because I came out facing the ground. For a moment, everything appeared to be normal.

Then the obstetrician passed me to the pediatrician without saying a word to my parents. He took me over to the table inside the room and washed me down with his back turned to my mother and father. He gave me the standard Apgar test (the health checklist for every newborn) as if nothing was wrong, but something clearly was.

The excitement and relief at the birth of their firstborn quickly turned into strained confusion. No one in the room would make eye contact with them. My parents were both too scared to ask what the problem was as the pediatrician wrapped me in a blanket and passed me to a nurse-both immediately left the room and shut the door behind them.

The obstetrician knelt down to finish the delivery by stitching my mother. A thick cloud of fear loomed over the room. My parents were stunned and silent.

Eventually, the obstetrician stood up and said, "I need to check on some things right away with your son, but I should be back with him in a moment."

"So it's a boy?"

"Yes, Scott ... but some tests need to be done to make sure everything is in order before you can see him," the doctor said. "I'll go and check on that now."

The pediatrician stepped back inside the delivery room and paced toward my parents as he stared down at the floor. He slowly lifted his head to speak.

"There are some problems with the baby."

He paused, as if trying to find the right words, before explaining: "He is missing most of his limbs. We did some preliminary tests to determine if he has all of the necessary internal organs to survive, and everything else seems fine."

"It appears as though he'll be all right, but we want to make sure before you see him."

The doctor left my parents alone inside the delivery room. They didn't know what to do-they were too shocked by what had happened, too scared of the unknown, and too confused by the entire situation. They felt as though the world had collapsed around them. My father looked into my mother's eyes, and both of them began to tear up out of sheer uncertainty.

The obstetrician looked at my parents and tried to speak. "I'm Sorry ... I'm sorry," was all he could manage to get out. He left to check on me in the intensive care unit.

My father glanced over at the IV running into a vein in my mother's arm and noticed that the tube had lost its fluid. He rolled her over towards her stomach to examine what happened and discovered that during all of the chaos of the delivery, the IV had somehow slipped out. The table and its sheets were soaked in blood from a large vein, the blood running all over her back.

My father screamed out for help. Nurses rushed into the room, shoved the IV back inside of my mother, and rushed to pump blood inside of her to replace what she had lost.

My father stumbled back and collapsed in a chair. He was sick to his stomach and felt almost faint from trauma. His newborn son was undergoing urgent tests for a problem that no one could explain to him. His wife nearly died from blood loss on the delivery room table. Nothing could have prepared him for this.

The fear of the unknown nearly overwhelmed my parents before they were even allowed to see me. It took them a moment to gather courage to see their firstborn child-hoping for the best, praying against the worst-when the pediatrician returned, carrying me wrapped inside a blanket. He had a look of sympathy on his face as he passed me to my parents.

My father looked down at me and beamed. With my head supported by his shoulder, he took his left hand and uncovered the blanket to see my missing limbs. He didn't grimace. For a moment, he was proud that my features already resembled his.

My mother sighed with joy as she said, "I can't believe he's so beautiful."

As they talked, my parents felt God was telling them that everything would be all right; that He wanted them to celebrate the birth of their firstborn son, that they should dispel fear and doubt. The shock and uncertainty were still there, but prayer and faith kept my parents from succumbing to pessimism or depression. Prayer kept my parents going in the worst moments, even though it did not deny anything or magically remove worry. It was a dialogue of emotion and faith that kept my parents as balanced as they could be under the circumstances.

A nurse returned shortly after to carry me away for more tests. I spent the next three days in the hospital away from my parents. Half of the time I was in the intensive care unit while my family had to wonder what else could go wrong. Three days gave them a long time to ponder the worst possibilities, and still no one could provide a definitive answer about why this had happened or what the consequences might be.

Thankfully, the support system of my extended family was already coming together to help out. My grandparents on my mother's side were visiting family in Tifton, Georgia when I was born. As soon as they heard about me, my grandmother and grandfather rushed to the Atlanta airport and headed to Washington D.C. They knew it would be close to a fifteen hour drive and couldn't stand the thought of their daughter and son-in-law being alone at such a time. My father's mother flew in from Michigan at the same time. When they arrived, they found my parents distraught, exhausted, and shell-shocked by the experience.

Social worker after social worker tried to comfort my father and mother, but failed-my parents were overcome by needless guilt, denial, anger, and resentment. I was still going through test after test at this point, but each test just meant another possible worry.

My parents and grandparents prayed for hours that I would survive the first few days of my life. No one apparently had any certainty about what would happen to me. There were only questions that couldn't be answered.

My father didn't know what to do. He had planned on leaving the service once his term was up in three weeks. He was going to attend college in the fall. But now, as a young father with little margin for financial difficulty, he faced an enormous burden-the prospect of a tidal wave of medical bills, treatment, and God knows what. His hopes of obtaining a college degree appeared to be crushed; he had no immediate potential for a steady job, but he needed to find one. Even then, how would he pay the bills? He had every reason to expect that I would be far more expensive in my needs than a normal child, and without a college education, my father feared he could not earn the money our family would need.

After the hospital released me, my parents had a follow-up visit with Dr. Charles Epps, a specialist who had experience with kids like me. He told my parents that my condition is technically called Quadramembral Phocomelia, a defect that has an unknown cause. Congenital amputation happens about once every two thousand births or so-but it usually affects just a finger, or toes, or an arm.

Dr. Epps told my parents that it was likely I would end up using a wheelchair to get around when I was older. He urged them not to let anyone amputate my feet, explaining that while it would be easier for my legs to fit prosthetics if they did so, I would likely never be able to walk with prosthetic legs. He also arranged for my parents and me to meet with another family, who had gone through this same ordeal eighteen months earlier.

Through prayer, my parents came to accept that they couldn't change what had happened. They couldn't make me the perfect child they had dreamed about. They could only accept the reality of it, lean on their family, and have faith that things would work out for the best. They prayed for guidance.

Three weeks later, we moved to Fort Wayne, Indiana, where my mother's parents lived. My parents knew they needed help to raise me and to bear the emotional and financial burdens of the coming months and years.

My parents focused on the fact that they had a responsibility to work together and try to give me the best and happiest life that I could possibly have. In the end, I was the firstborn son in my family-and nothing else mattered.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from No Excuses by Kyle Maynard Copyright © 2005 by Kyle Maynard. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 28 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(25)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 28 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2012

    Inspirational

    I use to wrestle in high school and when i read this book, i swear something inside me kicked into overdrive. You will love this book! Even if you never played sports you can relate it to some aspect of your life. I know everyone will love this book and kyle maynard.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2014

    No Excuses is an amazingly inspiring book! To me, I felt very mo

    No Excuses is an amazingly inspiring book! To me, I felt very moved because most people don't really understand how tough it is to pull out inner strength and become the best in every way that you can when you are disabled. Very real, with passion. I loved this book!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2014

    Kyle Maynard No Excuses is about the struggles and hard obstacle

    Kyle Maynard No Excuses is about the struggles and hard obstacles of an amazing life that he was blessed with, being handicapped with having no arms and legs, he is determined to be just like any old regular adult, by going to school as a full time student, still (handless) having impecable handwritting. Loving what he does best, is being an athlete, although the struggles of his life might have lead him to believe that he couldn't do it, but he succeeded with what made him happy and became one of the top High School wrestlers in the state of georgia. Having that, Kyle could also bench 360 pounds, which was recorded to be 3 times his body weight. Currently now, he is a sutdent at the University of Boulder. What stuck out to me was a line quoted in the book. "Whenever I've faced adversity, i've used that challenge as motivation to win through, no matter the cost. When I meet with failure, I pick myself up, dust off the dirt from the fall and fouls on trying again. You can't let failure beat you or give in to the temptation to take the easy way out. The worlds greatest accomplishments are no acuiaded for the first try. Having said that, when I do face the hard days, I go to what makes me happy, sports, and athletic activity, constantly keeping my brain and body going, regardless of the struggles I may have, that always help me relieve the stress and go back to the situation when I've fully calmed down. What I liked about this book, was the powerful and amazing story behind a man who went far in the sports and wrestling industry having no legs and no arms, and how in depth they went in with his struggles that went in to his life day to day. What I disliked about this book, is that they didn't get a lot of outside information about him, from parents, friends etc.. A lot was his opinion. I would highly reccomend anyone to read this, it is a great and powerful story that will win you over and make you smile and appreciate the life you live. My overall rating is a solid 10 out of 10. Great story, powerful message and great happy book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2014

    I Also Recommend:

    This story has two sides to it: The one is Kyle Maynard the indi

    This story has two sides to it: The one is Kyle Maynard the individual, who has the misfortune of being born without arms beyond the elbows, and without legs below the knees, drawing instant empathy and the other is the author, telling the inspiring tale, and the grueling process of overcoming his physical handicaps. You will admire Kyle's willpower in positivity and determination to beat life's fateful obstacles. The importance of a support team that pivots on the family, and caring by others inclusive of cultural values ring loudly.The book has a positive message for everyone. One can't help but wish Kyle success feeling his pain, which has been incredibly guarded, without the hint of looking for sympathy.The thing that i liked the most about this book was how it spoke so much about why the state of mind is the most important asset an individual possesses. One dislike I would have about this book would be the part where he took time to explain the sport of wrestling a little. My dad, uncles ,cousins and both Grandfathers wrestled/wrestle so I understand the sport, but I could see how this section would be beneficial to those who don't understand the sport. You should read this book because it helps put things into prospective, Kyle had every reason to quit and give in to his disabilities, but instead he fought back and came out on top. You will be motivated to be your best you because If Kyle doesn't have any excuses you will probably learn you don't either. I would also recommend the book American Victory , although I have not read this book my sister, who also read No Excuses, has and she says they are both motivational stories about athletes fighting impossible odds to end up champions. I would give this book 5 stars! I love the motivational lessons and messages it provides.
    Mariah Bell

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2012

    Wonderful story

    Just think . This kid can do anything. A great read for girls and boys, and their parents too. I encourage and recomend this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2012

    No Excuses in life or on the field

    My soccer coach recomended it and I am taking his word for it. I can't wait to read. It will show me the certain things in life that I might take for granted.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 6, 2012

    Aaa

    Heard dis was a good book

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  • Posted March 4, 2012

    Even when winning seems impossible, losing is still far from optional

    The book No Excuses by Kyle Maynard, is the story of a courageous young man who was born with only arms down to his elbows, and legs down to his knees. Throughout his life, Kyle faces a tremendous amount of adversity in almost everything he does. Even simple things like eating with silverware seem impossible, but Kyle is always able to overcome these obstacles and is very self reliant. Like many other kids Kyle had a huge passion for sports such as football and wrestling. By working extremely hard Kyle was able to become a successful wrestler and his senior year he competed in the varsity state championship match for his weight class. Even though he ended up losing this match, it was an incredible journey just to be in that match, and Kyle overcame a seemingly countless amount of obstacles. The major theme in this story is to never give up no matter how bad things may seem. From day one, Kyle was set up to fail, but he never let his disabilities stop him and continued to succeed against all odds. I loved this book because it has inspired me to always be determined and persistent toward reaching my goals, and even when facing adversity, to never give up. When ever I am feeling down, I need to remember that what I am facing isn't even close to what Kyle went through, and I if I have the same attitude as he did, I will eventually be able to conquer my obstacles. There is nothing in this book that I disliked, it has inspired me to become a better person and to never feel sorry for myself. Anyone who is going through a rough time should definitely read this book because it will help them realize that through hard work and determination, they can overcome what ever is keeping them down. Overall I give this book a five star rating because it is one of the best non-fiction underdog stories ever written.

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  • Posted April 17, 2010

    STOP making excuses!!!

    I have nothing to complain about! I can overcome anything! Great book! In our world today, this should be required reading so people stop feeling sorry for themselves and take control.

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  • Posted December 10, 2008

    Heart of a Champion

    No ExcusesKyle Maynard Regnery Publishing Inc. Washington, DC2005                           <BR/>  This has to be one of the most inspirational books I have ever read. This is the type of book that makes you feel like you have accomplished nothing compared to other people. The things that he had to accomplish, most people would never have dreamed of doing. This is the most powerful book I have come across in my life. Kyle is one of the strongest men I have heard of, not only physically but more importantly mentally. The things he has had to overcome are astonishing. He was born to head down the road of failure, but he decided that he was going to make something of himself. He was born without hands or feet. He had parents that did what 75% of the population would never even consider doing. They showed an amazing amount of love for their child. I think one of the main reasons he was so successful was that his parents never gave up on him no matter what the situation was. Kyle went through his life always trying to do new things and be successful. He continuously good better at almost everything he did. He tried so hard to succeed and never backed down from a challenge. He became a better person for that. He was not only a great competitor but he also hard a great spirit.  This has got to be the strongest book of all time. This book kept me reading for days on end. I couldn¿t put the book down. I learned a lot about life by reading this book. I hope that anyone looking for a good story goes and grabs this book. This book could change your whole view on life. Go grab this book.

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  • Posted October 24, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Amazing!

    Wow! I cannot believe the struggles he has gone through. I don't think I would have made it through it all. This story could be inspirational to all audiences. The book was given to me as a gift because I always complained about my scoliosis correction surgery and the pain it brings. After reading it, I'm still in pain, but I don't complain nearly as much as I did before. Thankfully, I am open-minded or I would be offended by the gift, thinking they were making fun of me. Instead, it helped me see that there are others out there in worse situations making it through life just fine, they just do things differently. Absolute must read!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2008

    Impossible is Nothing

    ¿Impossible is Nothing¿ Kyle Maynard is just like every other boy. Kyle loves sports especially wrestling and football. There is a difference though between Kyle and a normal boy. Kyle was born with a rare disorder called Congenital Amputation. That means he is missing most of his arms and legs. Even without hands he is an excellent student. He was almost always on the honor roll. Then Kyle wanted to go out for wrestling. His mom was very nervous about this but she let him try it out. When his coach Cliff Ramos first met him he thought he wouldn¿t be able to wrestle and, if he could he wouldn¿t be successful without arms or legs. Will Kyle prove him and all the people who said he couldn¿t wrestle wrong? I liked almost everything about this book. Everything that Kyle accomplishes is inspirational. Like when he went out for football in sixth grade and, he was the fastest guy on the entire defense. Or when he broke the bench pressing record. Even when he made varsity wrestling at the one hundred and three weight class as a sophomore. Even simple things like driving and typing on the computer. What I really liked is how he found his own way to do all of these things. Even with this major disability his father never gave him any special treatment. His father worked him hard because he knew the real world was not going to give him any special treatment. Even without limbs his dad made him learn how to walk and how to hold a pencil. What I didn¿t like about this book was when Kyle quit football to focus more on wrestling. I didn¿t like this because football would have made him a better wrestler. It would have kept him in shape and stay physical. I also liked how Kyle was very family oriented. His family came first in just about everything. He said his three sisters are his best friends. Kyle got to meet a lot of cool people like Arnold Schwarzenegger and, he got to go on the Larry King show. He has also appeared on ESPN multiply times. I like this because all of those guys said that Kyle was one of the best stories he has ever read about. Kyle reminds me of this kid in Dayton, Ohio who played varsity football without any legs. They were both born with similar disorders. Both of these guys are inspirational to me because they both found away to play there loved sports with disorders. This book is not in a series and I don¿t think it could ever be made into one because it is a biography of Kyle¿s life. A lot of people who like sports already know who Kyle is because he has appeared on ESPN many times. He also is well known for his ESPY award he won in 2004 for best athlete with a disability. So people who like sports will love No Excuses.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2008

    Impossible is Nothing

    Kyle Maynard is just like every other boy. Kyle loves sports especially wrestling and football. There is a difference though between Kyle and a normal boy. Kyle was born with a rare disorder called Congenital Amputation. That means he is missing most of his arms and legs. Even without hands he is an excellent student. He was almost always on the honor roll. Then Kyle wanted to go out for wrestling. His mom was very nervous about this but she let him try it out. When his coach Cliff Ramos first met him he thought he wouldn¿t be able to wrestle and, if he could he wouldn¿t be successful without arms or legs. Will Kyle prove him and all the people who said he couldn¿t wrestle wrong? I liked almost everything about this book. Everything that Kyle accomplishes is inspirational. Like when he went out for football in sixth grade and, he was the fastest guy on the entire defense. Or when he broke the bench pressing record. Even when he made varsity wrestling at the one hundred and three weight class as a sophomore. Even simple things like driving and typing on the computer. What I really liked is how he found his own way to do all of these things. Even with this major disability his father never gave him any special treatment. His father worked him hard because he knew the real world was not going to give him any special treatment. Even without limbs his dad made him learn how to walk and how to hold a pencil. What I didn¿t like about this book was when Kyle quit football to focus more on wrestling. I didn¿t like this because football would have made him a better wrestler. It would have kept him in shape and stay physical. I also liked how Kyle was very family oriented. His family came first in just about everything. He said his three sisters are his best friends. Kyle got to meet a lot of cool people like Arnold Schwarzenegger and, he got to go on the Larry King show. He has also appeared on ESPN multiply times. I like this because all of those guys said that Kyle was one of the best stories he has ever read about. Kyle reminds me of this kid in Dayton, Ohio who played varsity football without any legs. They were both born with similar disorders. Both of these guys are inspirational to me because they both found away to play there loved sports with disorders. This book is not in a series and I don¿t think it could ever be made into one because it is a biography of Kyle¿s life. A lot of people who like sports already know who Kyle is because he has appeared on ESPN many times. He also is well known for his ESPY award he won in 2004 for best athlete with a disability. So people who like sports will love No Excuses

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 4, 2007

    dont ever give up

    I am 26. I have a form of club foot that is congenital and in both feet. I've had two sets of surgery 12 years ago. I will have more surgery to keep me walking for another 10 year this winter. My doctors had told me when i was 14 that i would be crippled by 17. I proved them wrong. I am still walking... even if it is with crutches. I play for a APA team. thats amatuer billiards. as long as you believe in yourself and have the courgage to do what you want. you can do it. dont ever let some one that says 'you cant cause your disabled' keep you from what you want to do. the billiard team that i play for has been invited to the nationals two years in a row. I also am the sw virginia state trick shot champ. dont ever give up. have the courage to do what you want. that is what kyle's story tells me. he persiveers thru everything he does. this is a good book to give to familys of people that are just recently disabled... like para & quadrapelegics or some the the vets coming back from iraq. we can all learn from what kyle has done.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2006

    Mind over matter to the Max!!!

    I just could not lay this book down. Kyle chose one of the few truly 'man-on-man' sports and prevailed. He takes us from his inception to his final bout, and will inspire and recharge you, like few writings will ever leave you. No pity here. Neither for himself or for me (or you). He had his problems, so do you. No big deal... no excuses. Deal with it! WOW! I get recharged (a week after reading it) just from thinking about his words, and his world. Anyone who has competed in Anything can get something from Kyles book. In sports, business or just in life, this will help you. Period! THANK YOU, KYLE!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2006

    Read It, Its Worth It!

    I had heard about Kyle Maynard from martial arts project I had to do on Courage. I decided to read the book, and one of the mothers at karate lent it to me. My eyes and my heart are now truly open to everyone around me. Kyle has truly opened my eyes to what perseverance, hard work, and determination is all about. I also learned that just push yourself in the ring no matter how challenign the opponent may be.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2006

    drugs and AA

    I read and wow, I wondered if this is great for anybody on drugs or AA, self-pity, etc. because alot of people need to realized and need courage too.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2006

    No Excuses Review

    I was familar with Kyle Maynard's story off of a story that HBO did on him a few years ago, but it was nothing like what the book describes. 'No Excuses' has to be one of the best books i've read in years. It's definately a must read for anyone, especially for those who are disabled and having a difficult time with it. I work as an instructional assistant sub in my local county school system and this is a book that would advise to families to show that no matter what their child's disablity may be, all odds can be overcome with the right attitude. I have a friend who fights cystic fibrosis everyday of his life, and this is a book i would recommend to him as well as his family. Many people often view those with disablities as 'broken people', but this book says it all when it states that those people with handicaps are placed on this earth for a purpose and it teachs us not to judge a person by their looks or abilites, but to look far deeper, into the heart and soul within, and to find that thing that helps drive us forward in this life. To find that special something in us all that shows us that attitude is everything.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2006

    Outstanding example of courage to overcome obstacles

    I have a mild case of cerebral palsy. I admire and respect Mr. Maynard's positive outlook on life as well as his determination.I've had obstacles in my life but with God and my determination I learned to overcome these obstacles. Very well written. Keep up the outstanding work Kyle and no matter what never give up.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 12, 2006

    The real truth

    I can relate to the setting because it takes place mostly in the practice room or on the mat. Like this one part in the book talks about how he makes it to state. My brother also did and I could just picture everything that he was explaining. When he talked about practicing I pictured the wrestling room at Oak Hill, just with different people in it. I can relate to Kyle because he wrestles and so do I. He is physically handicapped but in the book he says that everyone is handicapped mentally. Kind of like ¿You¿re your own worst enemy.¿ I think that I could do a lot more if I just set my mind to it, which is what he does. And we both like to prove people wrong. He also seems to be a strong Christian who bases his life on, ¿I can do all things through Christ, who gives me strength.¿ Being in and participating in wrestling helped me understand what he was talking about. Although when he talked about being a congenital amputee I couldn¿t really relate, because I¿ve never been physically disabled. But, the plot was pretty much familiar. The theme of the book is obviously not to make any excuses. No matter how bad you¿ve got it you¿ve just got to make the best of it. I can relate because the fact that I¿m a girl does not give me the right to complain about wrestling. Same as Kyle, he had no arms or legs but that didn¿t tell him to not do or try anything just because he¿s a little different. This book was wonderful and anyone who enjoys reading an inspiraational storyy will love this. Thank you Kyle.

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